Seasonal seller

first_imgPotatoes are a very popular vegetable in Europe and were first cultivated by the Incas, in Peru, 6,000 years ago. They were brought to Europe by the Spanish Conquistadors to impress Royalty in around 1570.Although they started out as an expensive and exotic food, they became part of the British staple diet in the 18th century. The effects of the potato blight in 1840s Ireland are well-known, as the population dropped dramatically. It is thought that more than a million people died and another million emigrated.For culinary uses, potatoes are placed into two groups, waxy and floury. The floury potatoes are better for mashing, baking, roasting and frying and the waxy potatoes are better served as boiled potatoes, grated in rosti and sliced in gratins or put in stews. Choose potatoes that have a smooth skin and are firm. They should also not be bruised, green-tinged or sprouting. Mashed potato can be used to make Irish potato cakes, added to pastry for savoury pies, used in a very moist chocolate cake or mixed into bread dough. Uncooked grated potato can be put into cakes such as ginger cake or used instead of carrots or parsnips in a loaf cake.For more information on which type of potatoes to use see [http://www.britishpotatoes.co.uk]In season; main-crop potatoes are harvested September/October, but are available most of the year.Fiona Burrell, co-author of Leiths Baking Bible, from the world-famous Leiths School of Food and Wine—-=== In my world: the craft baker ===So here it is! The shock waves that were first reported earlier in the year have rippled out from the American Sub-Prime epicentre and are, right now, shaking the Cotswolds. Many people have battened down the hatches and are not venturing out. In an instant, we find footfall is the main problem, as are wastage, labour costs and knowing what to do first.So here is what I’ve done. The shop, with a café, has been most affected, so I have seized the reins, made the manager redundant and not replaced the outgoing summer staff, making immediate labour cost savings. This has only been made sustainable by reducing the opening times and changing everyone’s contract, so we now have only one very focused shift. I have also dramatically altered our café offering, so there is nothing made to order, installed a self-service dresser that makes tempting treats more accessible, complete with travelling toaster, which has been popular and encourages customers to try our breads. I have encouraged take-out loyalty, by introducing a little sandwich card, which we stamp each time a sandwich is bought – and the 10th one is on us. This sits alongside our well-used Coffee Loyalty Card. One team member has been tasked with monitoring orders/sales/wastage, so that we can be on top of these things on a daily basis.Across the shops, I have relaunched the humble 800g split tin and standard wholemeal as ’Budget Bread’ and put posters up outside, reading, “Hobbs House Quality for only £1.45”. This has been a great way of challenging the general perception that our offering is only top-end and has had the effect of increasing the sales of our premium loaf.The economic situation demands that we look at our business in a sharper way, find the things that aren’t working well enough and deal with them. If we survive, our businesses will be keener and fitter than before. How cathartic – a forced and early spring clean!I can report that bread sales are still strong, including the organic bread, and there has been growth in premium patisserie – I assume for customers who want to eat well at home instead of a meal out. The leaner team at the bakery/café has made for a better atmosphere, so service is better than ever. Anyone can sell when times are good, but during a downturn, sales staff training needs to be comprehensive. So, to avoid complacency, customer service training is my next focus.If only I knew if any of these actions will be enough to weather the storm. If you have any storm-proof tips or ideas. please let me [email protected]—-=== Culture corner: book review ===== Baking and Bakeries (£4.99) by HG Muller ==Anyone ordering a complete history of Baking and Bakeries off Amazon and expecting a letterbox-challenging brick of a book will be relieved to learn that your postie won’t be risking a hernia by having to lug an undelivered package back to depot. Weighing in at a mere 32 pages (including lots of pictures), this re-issue as part of the Shire Classics series, originally published in 1986, impressively races through 5,000 years of bread baking. This is little surprise, given that not much changed in baking technology between Roman times and the 1800s, when the back-breaking labour of mixing was finally done away with by mechanical mixers and “perpetual ovens”, and industrialised baking and moulders came into use for the first time.Tracing baking’s origins, Muller throws up a few intriguing facts: the typical ancient Egyptian was no carb-dodger, munching through an average 500g of bread per day. Nor were Egyptian bakers too hung up about clean labels, adding moth-repelling chemical camphor to bread, to delay staling. By the Middle Ages, the baker had developed the reputation of being unscrupulous, often accused of selling underweight bread, with grim punishment for those caught, including being burned to death in one’s own oven.The concluding potted history of 20th century industrial advances is particularly accessible to industry newcomers, or for anyone with a short attention span.last_img read more

Open consultation: Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job loss

first_img business individuals the occupational health profession Equality Act 2010 guidanceGuidance for employersGuidance for workersAlternative formatsAudio versionAudio version: Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job lossBritish Sign Language (BSL) versionBSL version: Health is everyone’s business: proposals to reduce ill health-related job lossOther formatsYou can order a Braille copy by contacting:[email protected] This consultation seeks views on different ways in which government and employers can take action to reduce ill health-related job loss. Disabled people and people with long-term health conditions are at greater risk of falling out of work.The proposals aim to support and encourage early action by employers for their employees with long-term health conditions, and improve access to quality, cost-effective occupational health.The Department for Work and Pensions and the Department of Health and Social Care want to understand the effect of these proposals on:center_img Work and Health ConsultationCaxton House6-12 Tothill StreetLondonSW1H 9NAlast_img read more

Adani Cancels $1.5 Billion Contract on Australian Mine Project

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Financial Times:Adani Group has cancelled a A$2bn (US$1.5bn) contract with a mining services company for work on its proposed Carmichael coal mine in Australia due to its failure to raise funds for the controversial project.The cancellation of the contract with Downer, an Australian company, on Monday is the latest challenge to hit the Indian conglomerate’s project, which has become a focal point for protesters over the role played by coal in causing climate change.It also follows a decision last week by the Queensland state government to veto a A$900m low-cost loan to Adani and the failure of Chinese investors to back the Carmichael mine.Adani said it remained committed to the A$16.5bn Carmichael project but planned to develop and run the mine on an owner-operator basis to achieve the “lowest quartile cost of production”.The Carmichael project has become a symbol of the global battle between environmentalists and the fossil fuel industry, attracting a series of legal challenges that have caused lengthy delays. The proposed mine sits in Queensland’s Galilee Basin, one of the world’s largest untapped coal resources.Adani’s board gave final approval for the mine in June. But raising money for the venture has so far proved an insurmountable challenge due to the decline in global coal markets and a vocal protest movement led by international environmental groups such as 350.org and Greenpeace.The project has become a litmus test on the future of coal, amid growing investor fears about whether increasingly onerous regulations on the emissions will create stranded assets.On Monday the world’s biggest coal terminal, Port of Newcastle, warned it needed to diversify and prepare for a future without coal.“It looks like another wheel has fallen off the Adani project,” said Tim Buckley, a director at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, an opponent of the Adani project. “With all of the Chinese banks ruling out involvement in the Carmichael proposal, deal funding has fallen over.”More: Adani cancels A$2bn Australia coal mine contract amid cash crunch Adani Cancels $1.5 Billion Contract on Australian Mine Projectlast_img read more

Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November

first_imgAttorney and Rep. Lois Frankel, D-West Palm Beach, faces Republican Cheryl A. Carpenter in November. Neither had a primary. October 1, 2000 Regular News Boca Raton attorney Steve Meyer was unsuccessful in a three-way Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Rep. William “Bill” Andrews, R-Delray Beach. Ocala attorney Judy Johnson won her two-way Democratic primary and is running against Republican Dennis K. Baxley on the general election ballot. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Stacy Ritter, D-Tamarac, faces Republican Joseph “Joe” Kaufman in November. Neither had a primary. Tallahasee attorney Joyce Dove and Cross City attorney Joseph Lander failed to make the runoff in a seven-member Democratic primary in a rural north-central Florida district. Attorney and Sen. Tom Rossin, D-West Palm Beach, faces Republican David Vaughan and a Reform Party candidate on the November ballot. Two other Bar members, Kevin Cannon of Orlando, and Rep. Luis E. Rojas, R-Miami, were unsuccessful in Republican primaries for two other seats. On the House side, lawyers are in five runoff primary races. In a Leon County district, attorney Lorranne Ausley faces Dr. Todd Patterson in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing a Republican nonlawyer in November. In a Lee County based district, attorney Jeff Kottcamp faces Marilyn Stout in the Republican runoff, with the winner facing a write-in candidate in November. Clearwater attorney John Carrasas is in the Republican runoff with Dave Miller, and the victor gaining the seat since only Republicans filed in that race. Boca Raton attorney Barry Silver faces Anne M. Gannon in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing write-in and minor party candidates in November. Boca Raton attorney and Rep. Curt Levine faces Irving Slosberg in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing a write-in candidate. In other primary races: Port Charlotte attorney Jerry Paul won a three-way Republican primary and faces a write-in candidate in November. Attorney and Democrat Kathy Castor was unopposed in the primary and faces Rep. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, winner of the Republican primary for a Tampa area seat. Tampa attorney and Democrat Betsy McCoy Benedict faces incumbent Rep. Sandra L. Murman, R-Tampa. Neither had a primary. Lakeland attorney and Republican Dennis A. Ross faces Democrat Coy W. Castleberry in November. Neither had a primary. Miami attorney Hector Rivera lost a three-way Republican primary that sent Rafeal Arza to Tallahassee, as no other candidates filed. Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November Both the Florida House and Senate will see some new legal faces among their members following fall elections, but whether the small number of lawyer-legislators increases in the 2000-02 term won’t be known until after November. A handful of lawyers, mostly incumbents but including some newcomers, have already won election as state representatives and senators. Others still face challenges in the October 3 primary runoff or the November 7 general elections. Among the new faces, Tampa attorney Arthenia L. Joyner, a long-time civic activist and former president of the National Bar Association, won her Democratic primary race and a House seat because no Republican or other candidate filed. Republican attorney Mark Mahon of Jacksonville defeated fellow attorney Charles McBurney in the primary to win a seat where no other candidates filed. Also in Jacksonville, Terry L. Fields defeated Jacksonville attorney A. Wellington Barlow in the Democratic primary to win a seat where no other candidate filed. In primary results, attorney and incumbent Rep. Gaston Cantens, R-Sweetwater, was reelected after defeating Robert J. Diaz in the Republican primary. Six incumbent attorneys in the House were returned without any opposition. They are former Bar Board of Governors member J. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, Christopher L. Smith, D-Ft. Lauderdale, Tim Ryan, D-Dania Beach, Kenneth Gottlieb, D-Miramar, Sally Heymann, D-North Miami Beach, and Marco Rubio, R-Miami. On the Senate side, veteran Rep. J. Alex Villalobos, R-Miami, will move to the other side of the Capitol rotunda as he filed unopposed for a Senate seat. Four other lawyer-senators filed for reelection and wound up unopposed. They are: John Laurent, R-Bartow, Burt Saunders, R-Naples, Steven A. Geller, D-Hallandale Beach, and former Bar Board of Governors member Walter G. “Skip” Campbell, D-Ft. Lauderdale. No lawyers won outright in the September primary in other Senate races, and lawyers remaining in those contests have opposition for the November election. No lawyers are involved in any primary runoff Senate campaigns. In those other upper chamber races: Miami attorney Tom David was unopposed in the Republican primary and faces Democrat Cindy Lerner in November. Spring Hill attorney Sabato DeVito was unsuccessful in a three-way Republican primary. Attorneys Edward Skinner Jones of Neptune Beach and Jeff Sneed of Atlantic Beach failed to make the Republican runoff in a four-way primary. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Carlos Lacasa, R-Miami, won a three-way Republican primary and faces a write-in candidate in November. Eighth Circuit State Attorney Rod Smith, a Democrat, won his primary for a Gainesville area seat and faces Republican Rep. Bob Casey in November. center_img Orlando attorney James Auffant had no Democratic primary opposition and faces Republican Jim Kallinger in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Gus Michael Bilirakis, R-Palm Harbor, had no primary and faces only write-in and independent candidates in November. Miami Beach attorney Dan Gelber won a three-way Democratic primary and is being challenged by an independent candidate in November. Winter Park attorney Stuart Buchanan did not have an opponent in his Democratic primary and will face the winner of a GOP runoff. Attorney and House Speaker-Designate Tom Feeney, R-Orlando, faces Democrat Glenda Conley in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Johnie Byrd, Jr., R-Plant City, faces Democrat John Wayne Clark in November. Neither had a primary. Ft. Lauderdale attorney and Democrat John P. “Jack” Seiler faces Republican Stephen M. Greep, Jr., in November. Neither had a primary. Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November Orlando attorney David Simmons won his two-way Republican primary and faces Democrat Ali Shahnami in November. Attorney and Democrat John Gillespie won the Democratic primary and the right to face Rep. Debby P. Sanderson, R-Ft. Lauderdale, for a Broward County seat. Bonifay attorney Roy Lake was unopposed in the Democratic primary and is running in the general election against Donald Brown, winner of the Republican primary. Palatka attorney Joe H. Pickens won a two-way Republican primary and faces Democrat Skeet Alford in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Larry Crow, R-Dunedin, had no primary and faces Democrat Sue Humphreys in November. Gainesville attorney Howard Rosenblatt was unsuccessful in a three-way Democratic primary. Democrat and Orlando attorney Ali Kirk Mashayekhi did not have a primary and faces incument Rep. Randy Johnson, R-Winter Garden, in November. Stuart attorney Joe Negron and incumbent Rep. Art Argenio defeated one other candidate to make the October 3 runoff. The winner faces a write-in candidate in November. All together, 48 attorneys filed to run in 44 House seats, and 11 attorneys filed to run in 11 different Senate races. (All 120 House seats are up for election and half of the 40 Senate seats.) After the first primary, 10 attorneys have been elected to the House, either because they were unopposed or had only primary opposition. Another five have been elected to the Senate for the same reasons. Four attorneys are still in the running for Senate seats, as are 25 attorneys for House seats. (Six attorney-senators are in the middle of their terms.) For the 1998-2000 session, there were 27 lawyers in the House and 13 in the Senate.last_img read more

So who won CFPB case?

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Republicans celebrated and consumer advocates have decried an Oct. 11 ruling that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is unconstitutional, but the ruling might actually derail Republican efforts to revamp the regulator.The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit found the regulator’s single-director leadership structure is unconstitutional.However, rather than suggesting adoption of a commission—something Republicans continue reading »last_img

5 ways the bureau can help credit unions now

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brandy Bruyere Brandy Bruyere, NCCO was named vice president of regulatory compliance in February 2017. In her role, Bruyere oversees NAFCU’s regulatory compliance team who help credit unions with a variety of … Web: www.nafcu.org Details Within the past year, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (BCFP) has gone through numerous changes reflecting new leadership. Many of these changes came as a result of reviewing various regulatory rulemakings that have had a significant impact on the credit union industry. NAFCU continues to fight on behalf of the credit union industry, as credit unions are still in need of additional relief. Here are five issues the bureau can immediately address to improve the regulatory environment. Remittance reliefSince 2013, when the bureau made changes to its remittance rule, NAFCU has been concerned about the rule’s highly burdensome compliance costs for credit unions.Responding to the bureau’s assessment of the rule last year, NAFCU asked that credit unions be exempted from the rule. “Numerous credit unions have been forced to stop offering remittance transfer services because the compliance burden is simply too high … With fewer credit unions continuing to provide such services, consumers’ options and ability to shop are severely limited,” NAFCU wrote to the bureau. Last year, the bureau said it would issue its assessment report by Oct. 28. Complaint databaseNAFCU has pressed the bureau to stop publicly publishing complaint information that cannot be fully verified in order to reduce the risk of reputational harm.In a recent letter to the bureau on the issue, NAFCU highlighted that credit unions take their member-owners’ issues seriously and work to resolve them efficiently and effectively, but that “current public reporting practices skew transparency and do not work as intended.” When unverified complaints are published on the bureau’s consumer complaint database, it “can pose serious reputational risks to targeted institutions.”NAFCU provided a list to the bureau of ways to improve consumer reporting practices, which can be read here. HMDA reliefWhile some Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) relief was passed into law as part of the NAFCU-backed Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (S. 2155), the association continues to push for more.A provision in S. 2155 would exempt depository institutions that have originated fewer than 500 open-end lines of credit and or fewer than 500 closed-end mortgages in the previous two years from certain HMDA reporting and recordkeeping requirements. The law also requires the Comptroller General to conduct a study to evaluate the HMDA amendments and submit a report on the results to Congress.The association has also asked that the bureau review its HMDA data collection activities, including limiting the collection to only those fields mandated under the Dodd-Frank Act. PALs safe harborIn May, the NCUA proposed NAFCU-sought changes to expand its payday alternative loans (PALs) program to offer a second PALs option – PALs II, and explore a third option – PALs III. NAFCU has long advocated for additional mechanisms to allow credit unions to provide more small-dollar, short-term loans to members in need, and also hosted a small-dollar lending working groupto explore additional small-dollar lending options for credit unions.NAFCU has asked the bureau to expand the safe harbor exemption to include all PALs loans not only to provide regulatory relief, but also to encourage more credit unions to begin or expand PALs programs. Qualified mortgage safe harborAs a result of the bureau’s ability-to-repay and qualified mortgage (QM) rules, many of NAFCU’s members have decided to extend only those mortgages that meet the definition of a QM because of the legal and regulatory risks associated with extending non-QMs.While recent changes to the Dodd-Frank Act have provided some relief with the addition of a new safe harbor category for loans held in portfolio, more can be done. NAFCU has recommended that the bureau reconsider the 2021 expiration of the temporary government-sponsored enterprise QM category, and make this category a permanent safe harbor exemption. Doing so would ensure that credit unions continue to have access to a healthy and functioning secondary market.last_img read more

Diversity and inclusion in the workplace Part II: The diversity scale

first_img This post is currently collecting data… This is placeholder text continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img We all come from different backgrounds and have had vastly different sets of experiences, and yet employees from every walk of life come together every day to collaborate and work toward the same goal of professional success. As a business leader, you probably already know that when you bring a diverse set of individuals together as a team, you bring in new ideas and perspectives as a result of combining different world views, cultures, nationalities, and experiences.According to SurveyMonkey, “Thirty-eight percent of the 12,543 working Americans surveyed said that diversity and inclusion is a high priority for their company, both for business reasons, and—more importantly—for ethical ones. More and more companies have set diversity and inclusion related goals and committed to pursuing a more balanced workforce.”Unfortunately, diversity and inclusion can be difficult qualities of a workplace culture to quantify. In this blog post, we’ll take a close look at the five levels of the diversity scale—discrimination, bias, tolerance, acceptance, and enthusiasm—and give you tips for cultivating a culture of acceptance and enthusiasm in your organization.last_img read more

Miranda Lambert Through the Years: ‘Nashville Star,’ Music, Marriages

first_imgMiranda Lambert has been unstoppable since she hit the music scene in 2003 as a contestant on Nashville Star. Since then, the country superstar has released seven solo albums, three albums with her group, Pistol Annies, and won countless awards for her undeniably catchy tunes.“I haven’t changed from Lindale at all,” she told Refinery29 in October 2019, referencing the Texas town where she was raised. “The only thing that has changed is that now I live in Nashville, I spend time in New York, and I have had a really amazing journey artistically so my career is on this path. Other than that, I’m still this same booze and jeans girl that I was before I left.”- Advertisement – Lambert’s marriage to Shelton ended in 2015, and she had two more high-profile relationships — with Anderson East then Evan Felker — before marrying police officer Brendan McLoughlin in 2019.“I met the love of my life. And we got hitched!” she gushed on Instagram at the time. “My heart is full. Thank you Brendan Mcloughlin for loving me for…. me. #theone.”Scroll down to see photos of Lambert through the years!- Advertisement – Lambert released her first album, Kerosene, in 2005. Six years later, she teamed up with fellow country singer-songwriters Ashley Monroe and Angaleena Presley to form Pistol Annies. The trio’s debut, Hell on Heels, hit stores on the heels of Lambert’s wedding to Blake Shelton.As her star continued to rise, the hitmaker’s personal life also became a hot topic.“I was a country singer in Nashville, and it was very comfy,” she told NPR in November 2019. “You had the right attention for the right reasons. And then the Hollywood thing came into the picture and it just threw me for a loop.”- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

The trendspotter

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Delancey in talks on two London stations

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img