UW eyes first two B1G wins in inaugural conference home series against PSU

first_imgA new era of hockey falls upon the Kohl Center Friday night as the No. 17 Wisconsin men’s hockey team opens the inaugural Big Ten conference at home with a matchup against hockey newcomer Penn State.“We have something that we are excited about. Hopefully we will get our first Big Ten win and be back home here for a while,” senior forward Mark Zengerle said.The Badgers (4-5-1, 0-2 Big Ten) will be looking to pick up that first set of wins in the conference after falling to No. 1 Minnesota (11-2-1, 2-0 Big Ten) on the road last weekend in back-to-back games of the B1G’s inaugural series. Follow a 4-1 loss Friday — despite taking an early 1-0 lead — the Badgers returned to the ice Saturday only to find a heartbreaking 4-3 loss in the final seconds of regulation.“We did more good things than poor things,” head coach Mike Eaves said. “We weren’t in our zone very much. We did a lot of good things but we got beat by our mistakes.”Though losses are never taken lightly, especially against the team’s biggest rival, Eaves was especially pleased with the pace his team skated at for the 120 minutes of ice time across the border. He believes that, alongside eliminating the fatal mistakes, maintaining that pace will be the key to Wisconsin victories moving forward.“Hopefully we will be able to play at the same speed and pace that we did and execution other than those four mistakes,” Eaves said. “If you can play with that same speed and pace that we did last weekend at Mariucci [Arena], that is top-level hockey and that is where we want to be.”Eager to get back on the ice to avenge their losses, the Badgers will play on back-to-back weekends for the first time since their opening two series’ of the season back in the middle of October. Having to maintain focus in a peculiar week-on week-off schedule with three bye-weeks has been a challenge both players and coaches have acknowledged.Now, with the recent losses, the Badgers are more ready than ever get back on the ice and collect a pair of wins.“A lot of guys are looking forward to it, especially after last weekend with the couple of losses. You get to go back out and try to get a couple of wins. It’s fun to have something to play for,” junior goaltender Landon Peterson said. “This first half is coming to an end, and I think a couple of big wins especially in the Big Ten is huge. Two wins is a big deal for us.”Aiding UW in its preparation for the Nittany Lions (3-7-1, 0-0 Big Ten) is a not too distant memory of the first time Penn State rolled into Madison last year. Riding a momentous win against the Gophers at the Hockey City Classic, the Badgers entered their first-ever series with the newly-formed Penn State hockey team, soundly winning 5-0 in game one.But a different fate fell upon UW as it saw a 2-0 lead fall to force an overtime period, eventually losing 4-3 to close out the season at the Kohl Center.“That was a pretty emotional killer for us last year. We ended up turning it around in the end but yeah the feelings we had after that game were pretty bummer-like,” Zengerle said. “We definitely don’t want to have that repeated.”Penn State will debut in the B1G conference this weekend after a mediocre start to its second season as a Division I program. Opening with a 3-3-1 record, the Nittany Lions have dropped four-straight games against then-No. 13 Massachusetts-Lowell and then-15 Union.Returning are most of their key players, including goaltender Matthew Skoff and redshirt junior forward Taylor Holstrom, who recorded two goals against UW last season including the game-winner in overtime.Under the direction of head coach Guy Gadowsky, Penn State finished its first Division I season with a near-. 500 record and went 3-2 against its new B1G opponents, splitting series’ with UW and Michigan State and trouncing Ohio State in a single-game meeting.“They shoot from everywhere. They play a simple solid game and can rely on their goaltending to make saves when they need them,” Eaves said. “It will be very similar to last year.”Skoff and the PSU defensemen will be warding off a UW offense that averages three goals-per-game this season, led by a deep and experienced offense. Led by a strong upperclassman core of senior forwards Michel Mersch, Tyler Barnes and Zengerle and junior defenseman Jake McCabe, the veteran Badgers account for 43 percents of the team’s scores and nearly half of all assists this season.Last Saturday, Zengerle recorded his 100th career assist for UW. He will carry the accomplishment into the weekend as momentum, looking to even translate a few of those goal-making opportunities to scores of his own, having notched just one goal so far this season.“It was nice… I’ve got to start shooting the puck more and scoring some goals but it was cool,” Zengerle said. “It just shows how many good players have come through here in my past few years.”The Badgers and Nittany Lions will face off at 7 p.m. Friday and 8 p.m. Saturday at the Kohl Center.last_img read more

‘Reading Rocks’ Program Aims to Help Students With Literacy

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisA new summer reading program called, ‘Reading Rocks!’ will be offered this year thanks to Alpena Public Schools. The ‘Reading Rocks!’ program is designed to help all students read better by the end of their 3rd grade year, and pass the new state requirements for reading levels.Back in 2016, Governor Rick Snyder signed into law a bill to aim at improving childhood literacy. Beginning in 2019 the new law will stop 3rd graders from moving on to 4th grade if their reading skills aren’t up to standard.Students eligible for ‘Reading Rocks!’ will be those having a difficult time with their reading skills, and for those currently in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade. The 4–week program will be available at all six district elementary schools.There will be 36 spots for each of the elementary schools with possible openings for other students to attend. Parents will be notified by May if their child has been accepted.The program will start on June 27th and end on July 20th. Each session will be from 9 am until 11 am.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: Alpena Public Schools, Childhood Literacy, Governor Rick Snyder, Reading RocksContinue ReadingPrevious Alpena Chamber of Commerce & AHS Hold Senior Advisory Career Prep to Help Students Prepare for Their Future in the WorkforceNext Girl Scouts of Alpena Donate Dresses for ‘Every Dress Has a Story’ Community Servicelast_img read more

LYIT SPORTS SCIENCE EXPERTS SET TO HELP ST EUNAN’S PLAYERS IN UNIQUE PROGRAMME

first_imgSt. Eunan’s GAA Club and the Sports Science Dept. at LYIT have entered into a partnership that will benefit both groups in the coming months and years.On Wednesday, the first two groups from the club, the U16 and Minor Boys footballers were put through their paces by the LYIT Sports Science staff and students with a Functional Movement Screening for each player.The screen will identify each players strengths and weaknesses with regards to agility, balance and co-ordination and the payers will then be given an individual programme to work to work to improve their techniques before being reassessed in 6 weeks’ time. Together with the new GAA Activate warm-up the St. Eunan’s club hope that this new partnership will lead to both injury prevention and also improved performance.Club coaching Officer Jim Clarke was at the forefront of this new initiative along with Head of Sports science, Dr. Lynn Ramsey and Ronan Doherty (Sports Science Lecturer).“We have been very impressed with the Sports Science now on offer here in Letterkenny at LYIT,” said Jim.“Sports Science now plays a huge part in preparing players and teams to get the best out of themselves performance wise and also through injury prevention. Obviously injuries cannot be avoided altogether but with the aid of science we can ensure we get players properly rehabbed and back on the playing fields quicker and in better condition. “The players will have to take on board their individual programme themselves as when they are reassessed it will very obvious who has or hasn’t done the work” Jim enthused.“This new relationship will work both ways as these students will have players that they can use for real data for their course work and projects and hopefully the club benefits both physically and mentally with better educated players who know what work is required to maximise their potential.“We will be rolling out the Functional Movement Screening with other teams through the course of the year and we are very excited to use the expertise that now exists in LYIT in a mutually beneficial partnership that we hope will last for many years to come,” he concluded.LYIT SPORTS SCIENCE EXPERTS SET TO HELP ST EUNAN’S PLAYERS IN UNIQUE PROGRAMME was last modified: February 27th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LYITsports sciencest eunanSt Eunan’s GAA clublast_img read more

Has Anti-Semitism Been Good for Jewish Evolution?

first_imgNational Geographic News gave favorable coverage to a controversial theory by anthropologists at University of Utah that anti-semitism was a form of natural selection.  The racism against Jews in Europe, while selecting for higher intelligence, also selected for certain types of diseases.  Reporter James Owen did point out that not all anthropologists agree with the hypothesis that IQ differences can have a genetic basis.That such poor reasoning and lousy science would get prominent coverage in the leading popular geographic magazine in the world is an illustration of the pernicious influence of evolutionary thinking on our society.  This hypothesis downplays the intellectual and moral factors involved.  Consistently followed, it would lead one to believe that anti-Semitism has been a good thing, if it led to the genius of Einstein.  If this kind of sloppy research, based on faulty assumptions and selective statistics, were published in some other field, it would be quickly scorned by academics.  The phrase “natural selection” is like a free pass around the security guards of science.  Should evolutionary anthropologists watch an Auschwitz as detached observers, measuring what genetic traits are being naturally selected by the process?  It’s time to call moral evils evil instead of rationalizing them on evolutionary grounds.  Let’s see how they explain it when the public has had enough, and there is a widespread outcry against Darwinian thinking.  Would that prove survival of the fittest ideas?(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Plant Lignin Found in Red Algae

first_imgTime to rewrite the textbooks again.  The story of plant evolution is wrong.  Lignin, a chemical that gives wood its stiffness, was thought to be unique to land plants.  Now it has been found in red algae, reported Science Daily, with the title, “Billion-year Revision Of Plant Evolution Timeline May Stem From Discovery Of Lignin In Seaweed.”  This story illustrates that anything is possible in evolutionary biology these days.    According to evolutionists, red algae emerged much earlier than land plants.  How are they going to explain a complex molecule, which is manufactured by a complex process, being found in a more “primitive” life form?  “Because red and green algae likely diverged more than a billion years ago, the discovery of lignin in red algae suggests that the basic machinery for producing lignin may have existed long before algae moved to land.”  But that just seems to restate the problem.  The alternative, though, is even harder to swallow: “Alternatively, algae and land plants may have evolved the identical compound independently, after they diverged.”    The independent evolution of an identical compound in unrelated lines is tantamount to a miracle.  Look what Mark Denny of Stanford said about this: “The pathways, enzymes and genes that go into making this stuff are pretty complicated, so to come up with all those separately would be really, really amazing,”says Denny.  “Anything is possible, but that would be one hell of a coincidence.”Paper View: Denny’s statement warranted a further look at the original paper in Current Biology.1  Sure enough, the only two options were evolutionary, and neither was unproblematic.  “The discovery of polymerized hydroxycinnamyl alcohols (lignin) within the cell walls of a red alga has major evolutionary implications,” they said in a tone of understatement.  Either the ability to synthesize lignin emerged in a single-celled ancestor (with no need for the sturdiness of plant stems), or it emerged by convergent evolution in unrelated lineages.  “Because monolignol synthesis is exceptionally complex, it seems unlikely that Calliarthron [the red alga] and terrestrial plants evolved monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization completely independently,” they confessed (see 05/30/2008, bullet 2).  Why, then, did the title of their paper say this “reveals convergent evolution of cell-wall architecture”?  Perhaps there is a way to get the best of both explanations.  “It seems more likely that relevant pathways, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and polymerization by peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation, may be deeply conserved, having evolved prior to the divergence of red and green algae more than 1 billion years ago.”  If so, “we may expect to find conserved enzymatic pathways and, potentially, evidence of lignification among the multitude of evolutionary intermediates.”  The search is on.    Nevertheless, they did entertain the possibility that red algae and land plants converged on the highly-complex lignin pathways independently.  For support, they pointed to one other case of convergent evolution in lignin synthesis: “For example, angiosperms and the lycopod Selaginella synthesize S lignin via distinct and independently evolved cytochrome-P450-dependent monooxygenases, and production of S lignin in Calliarthron may reflect a third convergent pathway.”  This seems to beg the question that they evolved.  Perhaps two improbabilities are better than one, and three better than two.  Since nothing but evolution is allowed in the explanation, though, those are the choices.  Maybe imagining other uses for lignin in microbes will help:Lignins are thought to have evolved in the green algal lineage as adaptations to terrestrial habitats, facilitating hydraulic transport and contributing to the mechanical stability of upright stems.  However, contrary to the current paradigm, our data indicate that H, G, and S lignins exist within a red alga’s calcified cells that lack hydraulic vasculature and have little need for additional support.  We speculate that lignin biosynthetic pathways may have functioned in the common unicellular ancestor of red and green algae, protecting cells from microbial infection or UV radiation, and in Calliarthron, lignins may orient the fibrillar scaffolding that guides CaCO3 deposition.While we’re speculating, let’s imagine more with the long leash of evolutionary thinking.  There may have been other needs within brainless microbes that provided opportunities for evolutionary invention via “selective pressure.”The presence of G lignin within the secondary walls of peripheral genicular cells may represent convergent evolution of cellular architecture in response to mechanical stress, given that G lignins also concentrate within secondary walls of terrestrial plant fibers.  Selective pressures in the marine environment differ from those on land, but the wind-induced drag forces that presumably contributed to the evolution of wood in terrestrial plants are mirrored by flow-induced drag forces on aquatic algae.  On land, xylem lends mechanical support to erect stems, and in water, genicula provide mechanical support to Calliarthron fronds.  As articulated fronds bend back and forth under breaking waves, bending stresses are amplified within peripheral genicular tissue, which develops thick secondary walls, apparently to resist breakage…. We hypothesize that this putative 3- to 5-fold upregulation of lignin biosynthesis in peripheral genicular cells may be mechanically stimulated by bending stresses imposed by breaking waves.  Similar mechanical on/off switches for lignin accumulation have been noted in terrestrial systems: plants grown in microgravity synthesize less lignin, whereas plants grown in hypergravity synthesize more lignin.  The mechanical consequences of such minute quantities of lignin on genicular material properties may be negligible.  Nevertheless, that genicular tissue contains lignin and is also stronger, stiffer, and yet more extensible than other algal tissues is an intriguing coincidence, and lignin’s potential role in these properties is an area of active research.Their reasoning leaves out a key question.  Their evidence refers only to spots where lignin accumulates in response to mechanical stress.  How did it get there in the first place?  What does accumulation have to do with the origin of the lignin synthesis machinery?  They didn’t say.  The argument merely hints that an applied stress will somehow produce the goods.  Necessity is the mother of invention.    Having earlier admitted that lignin synthesis is “exceptionally complex,” it is perhaps surprising to hear them land on the side of convergent evolution in their concluding paragraph.  Their last sentence included overt teleological language:Convergent evolution of cell structure and development in Calliarthron genicula and terrestrial xylem may clarify lignin biosynthesis and lend insight into the early evolution of land plants.  It is striking that Calliarthron contains lignified cell walls but evolved from calcified ancestors that lacked water-conducting tracheids or vessels.  Vascular plants may have realized hydraulic transport by tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that initially evolved to fortify unicellular walls and were later adapted to provide biomechanical support.With funding from the National Science Foundation, Patrick Martone (co-author with Denny) is continuing work on this surprising discovery.  Science Daily ended, “Martone says the research team has started looking for billion-year-old lignin genes that might be shared among land plants and red algae, and has started exploring whether lignin exists in other aquatic algae and what role it plays in the evolution and function of aquatic plants.”1.  Martone, Estevez, Lu, Ruel, Denny, Somerville and Ralph, “Discovery of Lignin in Seaweed Reveals Convergent Evolution of Cell-Wall Architecture,” Current Biology, Volume 19, Issue 2, 27 January 2009, Pages 169-175, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2008.12.031.Darwinism is supposed to be this law-governed, enlightened, mechanistic, scientific theory that gives rational explanations for observed phenomena in nature.  Pray tell, what is the difference between their evolutionary explanation and that of a shaman?  We have just seen these scientists invoke spirits.  They called on the spirit of convergent evolution, the spirit of Tinker Bell, and the spirit of vascular plants tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that “initially evolved to fortify” cell walls of microbes.  These purpose-driven spirits produced lignin biosynthesis machinery on demand, just because of environmental stress.  Miraculous (see 03/25/2003).  “Anything is possible,” Denny said.  At least Christians have a sufficient Cause when they say, “With God, all things are possible.”    When you learn to look past the big words and identify the key passages in a scientific paper, it’s like taking your gaze off the Wizard of Oz act and pulling up the curtain where the charlatan is hiding.  A theory that says “anything can happen,” even coincidences that are “really, really amazing” can explain anything.  Is this enlightened?  Is this progressive?  Is this rational?  No matter what the observations, the Darwin Party has carte blanche to say “It evolved, because stuff happens” (09/15/2008).  To get really disgusted, read how the Astrobiology Magazine spun this finding in to a positive for evolution!  “The team’s finding provides a new perspective on the early evolution of lignified support tissues – such as wood – on land, since the seaweed tissues that are most stressed by waves crashing on shore appear to contain the most lignin, possibly contributing to mechanical support, says Martone.”  This is why we really need to end the one-party rule in science.  The Darwinists have done nothing to stop the rampant, blatant, out-of-control identity theft (05/02/2003) and credit fraud (08/24/2007) that is damaging the public trust (12/18/2002).(Visited 371 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ivory Coast take on ice bucket challenge helps fight Ebola

first_imgIce-cold, soapy water … Ivorian Twitter celebrity Edith Brou’s Lather Against Ebola campaign encourages participants in the soap bucket challenge, an Ivorian variation of the ice bucket challenge, to donate bars of soap and bottles of antiseptic instead of cash. • Mobile phone boost to African internet • #BringBackOurGirls shows the power of social media in Africa • How Africa tweets • So this giraffe walks into a restaurant … and the video goes viral • Africa refocused: images of GhanaNdaba DlaminiIvory Coast is giving the global sensation of the ice bucket challenge a new – and educational – meaning as a way to spread the need for hygiene in the face of the deadly Ebola epidemic affecting its neighbours.A brainchild of one of Ivory Coast’s most prominent Twitter users, Edith Brou, the Lather Against Ebola campaign encourages participants in the “soap bucket challenge”, an Ivorian variation of the ice bucket challenge, to donate bars of soap and bottles of antiseptic instead of cash.The original ice bucket challenge was a hugely successful viral campaign in which people challenged their friends to film themselves pouring ice water over their heads. It has raised millions of dollars worldwide to fund research into a fatal degenerative nervous disorder called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The Lather Against Ebola campaign, with the French hashtag #MousserContreEbola, has gone viral on Twitter and Facebook in the West African region, helping raise awareness about a disease that has claimed thousands of lives in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.With 1.4-million Facebook users in Ivory Coast, the internet has played an increasingly important role in politics and society in the country.Brou kicked off the campaign in August this year, posting a video of herself standing on a balcony at her workplace in Abidjan. “Against Ebola, you need good hygiene,” she says in the video before a bucket of soapy, ice-cold water is dunked on her head by a friend.For her efforts, Brou’s video was an instant hit on social networks, garnering 4 000 hits. She then challenged three fellow bloggers including Nouho Bamba, who goes by the pseudonym La Rigueur Bino. Bamba claims to have 150 000 followers on social media.Subsequently, Bamba came up with his own soap bucket challenge video. In it, Bamba gets a little quirkier in his approach and throws himself – fully dressed in a business suit complete with suitcase in hand – in a swimming pool. The video got more than 52 000 hits.“I knew that jumping into a pool would create a buzz,” said Bamba. “Today, even children need to understand what Ebola is.”Besides being a critical tool to educate and raise awareness of Ebola, the soap bucket campaign is a good example of the power of social media to bring people together for a just cause, and also an opportunity for bloggers to showcase their popularity. One blogger, Israel Yoroba, has composed a song entitled “Stop Ebola” that is being used a waiting tune by a local phone operator.Bloggers have been able to put key issues onto the public domain, and good examples include highlighting the negligent death of a young model at a hospital in Abidjan earlier this year and keeping people informed about the New Year’s stampede which led to the death of 61 people outside Abidjan Stadium in 2013. Social networks also proved to be a powerful tool during the violence that followed the disputed election in 2010, when more than 3 000 people were killed in five months. A hashtag #CIVsocial was used on Twitter to help coordinate relief efforts and share information.last_img read more

In Other News Florence Left 55M in Damage at Ft Bragg Florida

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Fort Bragg suffered about $55 million in damage from Hurricane Florence, which dumped several feet of rain over parts of eastern North Carolina last month, the post’s garrison commander said Wednesday during the annual Greater Fayetteville Chamber State of the Community. About 600 buildings were damaged, Col. Kyle Reed said. As of Sept. 30, the post had received about $6 mission in assistance, leaving a $48 million hole. “I’m working on that,” he told the audience, reported the Fayetteville Observer. … Enterprise Florida is looking for a firm to advocate for the state’s defense installation and missions before DOD and Congress. The contractor, which will work under the direction of the Florida Defense Support Task Force (FDSTF), will need to implement initiatives designed to enhance and secure the long-term viability, retention and growth of Florida’s defense assets. Responses to the RFP are due Nov. 9. For more information, contact Terry McCaffrey, FDSTF executive director, at [email protected] photo by Jason Whittakerlast_img read more