Gunners close in on Welbeck

first_img Press Association The 23-year-old appears set to be given the opportunity to leave Old Trafford as manager Louis van Gaal continues to build a squad he feels can challenge for honours. Arsenal’s north London rivals Tottenham were also believed to be keen on a move for Welbeck, who has scored 20 goals in 92 Barclays Premier League appearances, but the Manchester-born striker is now in talks with Arsenal. However, it remains to be seen if a deal can be agreed before the 11pm deadline – with Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger at a charity football event in Rome. Welbeck has appeared as a substitute in two of United’s league games so far this season – draws at both Sunderland and Burnley – and started in the remarkable 4-0 Capital Cup exit at the hands of MK Dons. Having come through the ranks at Old Trafford, Welbeck has also spent time out on loan at Preston and with the Black Cats before establishing himself in Sir Alex Ferguson’s first-team squad. Welbeck has scored eight goals in 26 England caps and has lifted the Barclays Premier League trophy and the League Cup during his time with the Red Devils. Now he could be set to become Arsenal’s fifth summer signing following the arrivals of Alexis Sanchez, Mathieu Debuchy, David Ospina and Calum Chambers and would add to Wenger’s options in attack – with Theo Walcott and Olivier Giroud both sidelined with injuries. center_img Arsenal have agreed a deal in principle to sign Manchester United and England forward Danny Welbeck as talks continue to complete the deal before the close of the transfer window, Press Association Sport understands. last_img read more

Blacks, Latinos more likely to be searched, arrested

first_imgTraffic stops have become a politically volatile issue. Minority groups have complained that many stops and searches are based on race rather than on legitimate suspicions. Blacks in particular have complained of being pulled over for simply “driving while black.” “The available data is sketchy but deeply concerning,” said Hilary Shelton, director of the NAACP’s Washington bureau. The civil-rights organization has done its own surveys of traffic stops, and he said the racial disparities grow larger the deeper the studies delve. “It’s very important to look at the hit rates for searches – the number that actually result in finding a crime,” Shelton said. “There’s a great deal of racial disparity there.” He called for federal legislation that would collect uniform data by race on stops, arrests, use of force, searches and hit rates. “This report shows there are still disturbing disparities in terms of what happens to people of color after the stop,” said Dennis Parker, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s racial justice project. He also said better reporting is needed. Like the 2002 report, this one contained a warning that the racial disparities uncovered “do not constitute proof that police treat people differently along demographic lines” because the differences could be explained by circumstances not analyzed by the survey. The 2002 report said such circumstances might include driver conduct or whether drugs were in plain view. Traffic stops are the most frequent way police interact with the public, accounting for 41percent of all contacts. An estimated 17.8million drivers were stopped in 2005. Black, Latino and white motorists were equally likely to be pulled over by police – between 8percent and 9percent of each group. The slight decline in blacks pulled over – from 9.2percent in 2002 to 8.1percent in 2005 – was not statistically significant, Durose said, and could be the result of random differences. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – Black, Latino and white drivers are equally likely to be pulled over by police, but blacks and Latinos are much more likely to be searched and arrested, a federal study found. Police were much more likely to threaten or use force against blacks and Latinos than against whites in any encounter, whether at a traffic stop or elsewhere, according to the Justice Department. The study, released Sunday by the department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics, covered police contacts with the public during 2005 and was based on interviews by the Census Bureau with nearly 64,000 people age 16 and older. “The numbers are very consistent” with those found in a similar study of police-public contacts in 2002, bureau statistician Matthew R. Durose, the report’s co-author, said in an interview. “There’s some stability in the findings over these three years.” last_img read more