The line that defines

first_imgFor nearly 2,000 miles, it runs alongside California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. It begins in the east in Brownsville, Texas, and marches west along the Rio Grande, halting at the Pacific, in the town of Tijuana, notorious for its drug violence and reputation as a party spot for frat boys.Whatever the cause, the mythic U.S.-Mexico border draws millions of people to it each year. It’s the most frequently crossed international border in the world, and is one of the most intriguing unseen lines in history.Just ask Rachel St. John. In her new book, “Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border,” the Harvard associate professor of history traces the border’s origins to its modern-day consequences.The eastern U.S.-Mexico border was easy to establish: the Rio Grande forms a natural divide. But after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the Mexican-American War in 1848, diplomats gathered with maps to configure the western border. According to St. John’s research, they drew arbitrary lines, following no existing geographical feature, but connecting a few known spots like El Paso, the Gila and Colorado rivers, and San Diego Bay.Armed with maps and equipment, a U.S.-Mexico boundary commission next set out into the barren and inhospitable desert with the task of formally surveying and demarcating that part of the border.“There’s this idea that you can draw a boundary line on paper,” mused St. John, “but that’s much harder to put into effect when you get on the ground.”Some of the men’s maps proved incorrect, which spurred on-the-spot compromises — just another added stress in addition to contending with everything from heat and rough terrain to getting lost, Apache attacks, and sometimes death.“The one part of the boundary line that corresponded to a natural geographic feature, the Gila River, was made obsolete by the renegotiation of the border in the Gadsden Treaty of 1953,” wrote St. John. “From that point on, with the exception of a small stretch of the boundary line that runs along the Colorado River, the western border was made up of a series of imaginary lines.” Finalized in 1854, “the boundary line as it exists today was in place,” she said.But what St. John finds remarkable is the shift in the border’s meaning over time.“When the border was first drawn, the government thought, ‘No one’s ever going to come out here. This is the middle of the desert — who cares what happens,’” she said. “But there’s a massive change in economics that begins in the U.S. and spreads into Mexico in the late 19th-century. And as you have the development of this capitalist economy, the border takes on different meanings.”Cattle ranching and mining became big industries, and a railroad was built on the U.S. side. The exchange of goods prompted the U.S. government to send customs agents to the border, and, said St. John, “It’s really the change in the economy that causes the government to care about maintaining the border.”According to St. John, most people assume today that the border is there to regulate the movement of people, “but the sense from both the U.S. and Mexican governments that they needed to regulate the movement of people is a 20th-century phenomenon.”The first people who the U.S. government wanted to control weren’t Mexicans, but Chinese immigrants, St. John discovered. “I find it really interesting that during the first decade of the 20th century, you have Chinese immigrants disguising themselves as Mexicans so they can cross the border.”St. John grew up in Southern California, and as a teenager sometimes trekked to Tijuana herself. “I remember one day thinking, ‘It’s really interesting how the border is one way on this side, and on the other side it’s totally different,’” she recalled.The border now is political, policed, and unpredictable. “All the attention on the border, in some ways, is not a very effective way of dealing with larger problems of managing immigration and other smuggling. Many people in the U.S. without proper documentation entered legally and overstayed their visas. This emphasis on building a wall doesn’t necessarily match up with the issues people are trying to address,” said St. John.“But one thing studying the border has taught me is that it hasn’t always meant the same thing, and so it’s very possible that in the future it won’t mean the same thing,” she noted. “At no time that I’ve seen does anyone want a totally closed or open border. It’s all about creating a border that’s a force field — it lets in the things you want and lets out the things you don’t.”last_img read more

Cotton Award Winners

first_imgRegion 2Less than 500 acresGrower: Tucker Cobb, Washington CountyGinner: Midville Warehouse Inc.UGA Extension agent: Brent Allen The University of Georgia Cotton Team recognized the best cotton producers in the state with the 2018 Georgia Quality Cotton Awards during the Georgia Cotton Commission’s annual meeting and UGA Cotton Production Workshop held on Jan. 30, 2019, in Tifton, Georgia.The awards are presented in three cotton-acreage categories within the four regions of the state: less than 500 acres; 500 to 1,000 acres; and greater than 1,000 acres. Both the winning cotton farmer and the UGA Cooperative Extension agent for the county were recognized during the event.Cook County farmer Mike Lindsey was presented the Best Cotton Award, which is given to the farmer with the highest loan value and premium.Other 2018 winners were:Region 1Less than 500 acresGrower: Robert Rawlins, Turner CountyGinner: Sconyers Gin and Warehouse, SycamoreUGA Extension agent: Will Gay 500-1,000 acresGrower: Chad Hawkins, Wilcox CountyGinner: Arabi Gin Company, ArabiUGA Extension agent: Andrew Sawyer 1,000-plus acresGrower: RBF and M+S Roberts Farms, Worth CountyGinner: Worth Gin, SylvesterUGA Extension agent: Bryce Sutherland 500-1,000 acresGrower: Branch and Branch Farms, Tift CountyGinner: Omega Gin Company, OmegaUGA Extension agents: Scott Carlson and Justin Hand 500-1,000 acresGrower: Ed Wilson Farms, Jenkins CountyGinner: Midville Warehouse, MidvilleUGA Extension agent: Jason Mallard 1,000-plus acresGrower: Lancaster Farms, Pulaski CountyGinner: Heart of Georgia Peanut and Gin, HawkinsvilleUGA Extension agent: Jay Porter 1,000-plus acresGrower: Michael York, Brooks CountyGinner: BCT Gin Co., QuitmanUGA Extension agents: Stephanie Hollifield and Michasia Dowdy 500-1,000 acresGrower: Andy Sparrow, Seminole CountyGinner: Clover Leaf Gin, DonalsonvilleUGA Extension agent: Cody Powell 1,000-plus acresGrower: Dean JohnsonGinner: Bryant’s Gin, BartowUGA Extension agents: Katie Burch and Pamela Sapp Region 3Less than 500 acresGrower: Mike Lindsey, Cook CountyGinner: BCT Gin Co., QuitmanUGA Extension agent: Tucker Price Region 4Less than 500 acresGrower: Clifford Dollar III, Decatur CountyGinner: Sowega Cotton Gin and Warehouse, ClimaxUGA Extension agent: Nan Bostick “These are producers who are maximizing their productivity by having good quality as well as good yields,” said Jared Whitaker, assistant professor and Extension cotton agronomist at the UGA Tifton campus. “The Extension agents are vital to the success of these producers so it was important for us recognize their achievements as well.”Georgia’s 2018 cotton production season was hit by persistent rains in May, which delayed planting for many growers into June and July. Devastation from Hurricane Michael in October crippled Georgia’s cotton industry.UGA Extension agents and agricultural economists estimated that losses to Georgia agriculture from Hurricane Michael exceeded $600 million. Also, steady rainfall in November and December delayed or canceled harvests for a substantial portion of cotton acreage.“The quality that we’ve seen from these growers is impressive considering the type of year that we’ve had,” Whitaker said. “Our farmers faced just about every type of challenge you can imagine from Mother Nature this year. In a year where fiber quality was dramatically impacted, the fact that we still have a lot of growers making great-quality cotton is definitely a good thing.”The awards are co-sponsored by the Georgia Cotton Commission and BASF.For up-to-date information about the cotton crop in Georgia, visit http://www.ugacotton.com.last_img read more

LIVE: Botswana 42 Uganda 46

first_imgThe score at halftimeUPDATE– Netball World Youth CupFT- Uganda ?? 46 – Botswana ??  42Gabarone, Botswana| THE INDEPENDENT REPORTER |  Uganda’s She Pearls will come up against a high flying and unbeaten Botswana Under 21 side as the Netball World Youth Cup enters day 3 in Gabarone on Monday.LIVE Botswana stands in Uganda’s way at Netball World Youth Cup #NWYC2017 https://t.co/k2arTaF0g7 pic.twitter.com/2AWXnnEEyq— The Independent (@UGIndependent) July 10, 2017 Share on: WhatsApp #NWYC2017 LIVE! | Botswana v UgandaCheck out all of the action from the #NWYC2017 in Botswana on YouTube:… https://t.co/TBmZB07pVt — nwyc2017 (@nwyc2017) July 10, 2017last_img

Pitt, SMU to meet in BBVA Compass Bowl

first_imgGraham said Sunday that co-offensive coordinator Calvin Magee, tight ends coach Tony Dews and secondary coach Tony Gibson have left the program to pursue other jobs.A day earlier, the Panthers became bowl eligible with a 33-20 win over Syracuse.“You play an entire season to earn the opportunity for one extra game—a bowl game,” Graham said. “Our team is excited for the chance to put that Pitt helmet on one more time for the BBVA Compass Bowl. Birmingham is a great college football town. We’re looking forward to our visit and playing SMU in front of a national ESPN television audience.”Pittsburgh is making its fourth straight postseason appearance out of the Big East while coach June Jones has led SMU to three bowls in a row.The two teams have split their first five meetings, 2-2-1. SMU, out of Conference USA, won their only other postseason matchup 7-3 in the 1983 Cotton Bowl.SMU had a five-game winning streak after an opening loss to Texas A&M.“We are happy to be playing in the BBVA Compass Bowl and to get a chance for our eighth win,” said Jones, who is seeking win No. 100. “Our kids have worked hard this season and will be excited to take on a quality program like Pitt on national TV.”(For tickets and travel package information, call the Panthers Ticket Office at (800) 643-PITT.) CAPABLE BACK-UP—Pitt freshman running back Isaac Bennett had seven catches including one for a touchdown in the Panthers 33-20 win over Syracuse. (Courier Photo/William McBride) BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP)—Pittsburgh will face SMU in its second straight trip to the BBVA Compass Bowl with coaching issues again. Bowl officials announced the matchup Sunday for the Jan. 7 game at Legion Field.Pittsburgh beat Kentucky 27-10 last season in the first game after coach Dave Wannstedt was forced to resign. Now, his replacement, Todd Graham, must replace three assistants.last_img read more

Pool Named for Ranney School Teacher

first_imgBy Michele J. KuhnTINTON FALLS – Emmett Walling is a much beloved part of the Ranney School community and now he has an aquatic center named after him to prove it.Ranney School teacher Emmett Walling, second from left, and Lawrence S. Sykoff, head of school, use scissors to cut the ribbon for the Walling Aquatic Center as Walling’s wife Jackie, left, and Athletic Director Thomas Moriau look on.The Hope Road school dedicated its swimming pool and aquatic center in the name of the teacher/coach, who is in his 33rd year there. The special ceremony to honor Walling was held on the school’s track Friday, Oct. 5, and was attended by most of the school’s 800 students, faculty and staff.The bright hot sunny day had nothing on the warmth radiated by the crowd toward Walling. Smiles were plentiful and applause punctuated speeches and fond remembrances.Walling was obviously proud of the honor bestowed on him. It was the first time in the school’s history that a facility was named after a staff member. When he was told about the naming of the facility last spring, he said he was overwhelmed.“I could not even put it into words,” the 62-year-old teacher said prior to the ceremony. “I’m a very humble person. I’m not a chatterbox but words just can’t express … it’s just so great to know that in years to come my name will be connected with a pool that has meant so much to so many kids already.“It’s very, very exciting,” Walling said. “It’s rare that someone stays this long but when you find something this good, you stick with it. This is a very special place.”Walling says he loves what he does. “Every day is a challenge. I’ve got 3-year-olds right up to 18-year-olds. For a teacher, it doesn’t get any better than that,” said Walling who, as the Ranney School swimming teacher, has taught every student the school has enrolled since he started in 1980. He’s the only teacher in the school with that distinction.Walling, a Middletown native who now lives in Manasquan, learned to swim at Shadow Lake, where he lived as a child. “It was important for me to learn how to swim,” he said.  He is from a family of Belford Harbor lobstermen. “They made their money taking things out of the water. I’ve earned my living, supported my family, by putting things into the water,” he said with a laugh.Ranney swim coach Emmett Walling shares a moment with his wife Jackie before the dedication ceremony.He and his wife Jackie, who is a teacher in Ocean­port, are the parents of Kaitlin, a police officer in Cranbury, and 24-year-old twins, Emmett and Elizabeth.Walling is known as a patient instructor and coach who is trusted and respected by the children he teaches.“He has developed kids not just as swimmers but as people too,” said Valerie Francois, the school’s director of strategic marketing and communications.Thomas Moriau, Ranney’s athletic director, calls Walling “one of the most dedicated educators I know.“No one deserves this honor more,” Moriau said. “We have (an aquatic) facility second to none in Monmouth and Ocean counties and it’s because of him … Our students love to swim for this man.”Lawrence S. Sykoff, Ranney head of school, spoke of the “extraordinary work of this great man.” He recalled that Walling arrived on campus in 1980, the year the pool opened. After 32 years, “that pool has earned a name, a very special name.“Mr. Walling has guided hundreds of students to take their first plunge to learn to swim” and has made those lessons enjoyable for those he has taught, Sykoff said.The head of school said Walling was the embodiment of the school’s motto: “Know­ledge, Vision and Honor.”Senior Veronika Fischer, 17, of Rumson told those gathered to honor Walling that the swim coach was someone who worked six days a week, recognized students’ strengths when they couldn’t, sang Christmas carols with them when they practiced “and reminds us that it’s just a race.“Mr. Walling just doesn’t want us to swim our fastest, he wants us to swim our best,” Fischer said. “Mr. Walling teaches us that if you truly want something, you will have to work hard every day.”As the student turned toward Walling she told him, “There is no one who deserves this more than you do.”Doreen Fowlkes, a teacher at the school for the past 25 years, applauded her fellow educator. “It’s easy to identify why we are gathered here,” she said. “He’s not only being recognized for his 32 years at Ranney School, he’s being recognized for his character and for his professionalism.”Walling, who was hailed for his devotion to the school and its swim program and his determination to build the aquatic center now named after him into a top-notch facility, expects to spend another two years at Ranney School. At that time, after 35 years at the private school, he said he expects to retire along with his wife.last_img read more

March Moon Madness

first_imgMoons of our planetary system are supposed to behave themselves.  They were expected to just quietly orbit their host planets like nice, cold, frozen, inactive chunks of rock and ice.  It seems like whenever we get a close look at them, they are madly at work destroying theories – just like their planets have been wont to do.Io, Io, It’s Off to Work I Go:  “The results are surprising because no theory predicted upstream spots.”  Belgian researcher Bertrand Bonford was commenting on a press release from American Geophysical Union (AGU) about the volcanic moon Io, and how its eruptions create auroral spots on Jupiter.  “The finding of the leading spot puts all the previous models of the Io footprint into question,” the article said.Tethys Ocean:  The “surprisingly ordinary” moon Tethys at Saturn may have, or may have had, an underground ocean, according to National Geographic News.  The energy required to create the monstrous rift called Ithaca Chasma must have melted the ice below.  Where did the heat come from?  Since Tethys is largely ice, there would not have been radioactive elements sufficient to produce internal heat.  This leaves tidal flexing to create the rift – but only if there was liquid underneath.    The thought of water quickly led to thoughts of life.  A Cassini scientist told NGN, “This makes the exploration of icy satellites and their interiors even more important to understanding possible habitats for life in our solar system” and for how common life is in the universe.Do you want your Mars with salt?  Sodium chloride – good old table salt – may be common on Mars, said the BBC News and EurekAlert.  Because the salt may have become deposited in channels and lakes, some scientists immediately visualized the salt as a preservative for life.  Salt is a double-edged sword, however: “Water is the first sign that an environment might have been habitable, but waters that precipitate table salt on Mars would have been much saltier than any waters known to support microbial populations on Earth,” said Andrew Knoll of Harvard.  Salt is also a poison to organic soup (09/17/2002).Titan clash:  Titan isn’t rotating like scientists expected.  When they went to focus on a spot identified from a previous orbit, it was 19 miles off.  The only way they can explain it is by modeling an ocean under the ice, according to a paper in Science.1  If the crust is decoupled from the interior by floating on an ocean, it also means that Titan’s zonal winds can alter the rotation of the whole moon.  See explanation by The Planetary Society and press release from JPL.    The ocean-and-wind hypothesis is only a partial answer.  Christophe Sotin and Gabriel Tobie, writing in the same issue of Science,2 said, “However, the observations and model predictions do not correlate very well.”  Some are proposing a periodic wobble in the spin, or a large impact that might have sped up the rotation.  No impact basin large enough to record such an event has been found.  “There’s a fundamental difficulty with Titan global circulation models right now — all of them,” said lead author Ralph Lorenz, “–which is that they predict that the predominant winds at low latitudes near the surface would be easterly, from east to west.  Yet all the sand dunes point in exactly the opposite direction.  There’s something we do not understand about Titan’s circulation.”Back on earth, scientists are also scrambling to explain the origin of the home planet.  Science Daily, PhysOrg and National Geographic News all reported that a “new study is challenging the long-standing notion that the whole solar system formed from the same raw materials.”  Isotopes in meteorites don’t match those on earth.  To get around this problem, scientists are having to imagine that materials in the solar disk that supposedly gave birth to the planets got sorted somehow.    In addition, a news item in Nature News about the Genesis solar-wind collection experiment “raises more questions.”  The finding that “the Sun is relatively richer than Earth in oxygen-16, the most common oxygen isotope, contradicts the conventional wisdom that Earth has the same oxygen isotope composition as the Sun” the article said. “Everybody would have bet that the Sun had the same composition as Earth and the meteorites,” a French cosmochemist remarked.  “In fact, Earth is not like the Sun.”  Scientists are scrambling to model what process might have “sucked out oxygen-16 while the gas of the proto-Solar System condensed into solid grains that coalesced into the planets.”  If so, the article said, it would have had to happen early on.Footnote:  We’re still waiting for word about the Enceladus flyby results from March 12.  Expect more surprises.  Whatever is found will have to comport with findings of Roberts and Nimmo in the April Icarus.3  Their calculations show that neither radioactive decay or tidal forcing are adequate to maintain a liquid ocean under the crust for more than 30 million years (6% of the assumed age).  Heat is removed from the surface faster than it can be generated in the core, and tidal heating is far too low at the present orbit.  The only way they could rescue a long-lived ocean was to propose an ad-hoc scenario: perhaps the obliquity of Enceladus is pumped up from time to time.  “A transient ocean could exist beneath the ice shell today as a remnant of an earlier epoch of higher heating,” they said.  Such a phenomenon is beyond observation.1.  Lorenz et al, “Titan’s Rotation Reveals an Internal Ocean and Changing Zonal Winds,” Science, 21 March 2008: Vol. 319. no. 5870, pp. 1649-1651, DOI: 10.1126/science.1151639.2.  Sotin and Tobie, “Titan’s Hidden Ocean,” Science, 21 March 2008: Vol. 319. no. 5870, pp. 1629-1630, DOI: 10.1126/science.1155964.3.  James H. Roberts and Francis Nimmo, “Tidal heating and the long-term stability of a subsurface ocean on Enceladus,” Icarus, Volume 194, Issue 2, April 2008, Pages 675-689, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2007.11.010.Science marches on – sometimes in disciplined ranks, sometimes in scatter formation.  The latter occurs when observation bombs drop in on theory playgrounds.    Remember, the consensus theories that have been blown away by new discoveries were textbook orthodoxy a few years ago.  Only a devout logical positivist would think this could not happen to today’s accepted ideas.  Just wait.    Evidence does not exist in isolation.  To make sense, it must be incorporated into one’s web of belief by a number of auxiliary hypotheses and assumptions.  Planetary scientists interpret what Ithaca Chasma, Titan’s rotation and Earth’s oxygen-16 ratios mean through the filter of assumptions and auxiliary hypotheses that are rarely considered or questioned independently.    One of their most sacred assumptions is the A.S.S. (age of the solar system).  The accepted value of 4.5 billion years is written in their genes.  All evidence is viewed within this major structural component of their web of belief.  The web itself stretches and distorts as new evidence bombards it, but it would take a mighty big impact to break it.    Too much is at stake for secular planetologists, bent on finding life and evolution at every water hole, to allow that to happen.  Like predatory spiders, they snag the evidence, wrap it in theories spun out of their own selves, and suck the juice out of it to feed themselves and their young.  The dried up hulk that once contained structure, organs and connective tissue is discarded to blow away in the wind.    If you love and respect science, make like a bee instead.  Get busy and gather nature’s nectar far and wide.  Digest it carefully.  Transform it into something sweet to benefit others – something that will nourish the heart and bring delight to the eyes.  (Thanks to Francis Bacon for the metaphor.)(Visited 30 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Jets changed the world

first_imgIn the 100th year of the first commercial flight it is fascinating to look back at some of the major breakthroughs that have changed aviation for the passenger and to look at how passenger dress and cabin appointments have changed.When the 707, DC-8 and Comet 4 jets entered service in the late 1950s, there was a scramble to get a seat with many airline’s flights running at an extraordinary – for the time – load factor of 90.8%. Typically airlines flights were only 60 per cent full as this was before computer reservations and of course the internet, which have enabled airlines to dramatically increase the loads on flights.Passengers loved the jets. In the first five years of jet operations, Pan American’s overseas traffic doubled as the airline took delivery of more than 50 new Boeing 707s and Douglas DC-8s.When Pan American launched its jet service its founder and President Juan Trippe said: “Mass travel by air – made possible by the jet age – may prove to be more significant to world destiny than the atomic bomb. For there can be no atom bomb potentaiily more powerful than the air tourist, charged with curiosity, enthusiasm and good will, who can roam the four corners of the world, meeting in friendship and understanding the people of other nations and races.” Mr Trippe was so right.In 1960, for the first time, the number of passengers crossing the North Atlantic by air surpassed those on ocean liners. Pan Am was offering a return trip across the North Atlantic from only $298 – just slightly above what the one-way fare had been in 1952 – or just three weeks’ average salary.Tourist class or economy class as it was now called, dominated air travel in the 1960s to the point where first class had been reduced to just a small section of the jet’s cabin.And that cabin was luxurious with lounges and seating in economy class was very spacious with a seat pitch of up to 40 inches. Passengers wore the latest fashions with men in suits and women wearing pearls. Carry on was still just a hat and a book and overhead storage was just a hat rack.Meals were spectacular affairs– even in economy. The rationale was there was no in-flight entertainment to speak of, so passengers had to be occupied.Not only were fares plummeting, so were traveling times. Australia’s Qantas was able to slash the London-Sydney route from 48 to 27 hours, while the Sydney-San Francisco route tumbled from 27 hours to 18 hours. Interestingly, because of the enormous distances traveled by its passengers, Qantas had one of the biggest first class markets with 23 per cent of its travelers opting for the front end in the mid-1960s.In the US in 1950, air travel accounted for just 14 per cent of travel, with bus and train accounting for 38 per cent and 48 per cent respectively. Thanks to the piston engine Douglas DC-6 and Lockheed Constellation, by 1959 when the first US jets entered service 47 per cent of travelers were in the air, while bus and train had been relegated to 24 per cent and 29 per cent.In the 10 years to 1959, air travel leapt 250 per cent in the US. Ten years later in 1969, the number of passengers traveling by air in the US would triple – thanks to the new jets.And in the 50 years since 1964 the world wide aircraft fleet has grown from 3,137 to a massive 24,613 aircraft. Global passenger numbers have leapt from 412,000 a day to 8.5 million, while fares have dropped by 84 per cent. Air travel is booming!last_img read more

Chaos in garden of Eden due to officials’ sin

first_imgThe India-England WC match has been shifted as Eden Gardens couldn’t meet the ICC deadline.It was January 5, 1934, when Eden Gardens in Kolkata (then Calcutta) hosted its first test match which was between India and England. The then England team led by the legendary Douglas Jardine had put the people of Calcutta in embarrassment as India was out for 247 in the first innings, and was asked to follow-on.Fortunately, India could save its first game in Eden Gardens because of a brave halfcentury by Dilawar Hussain and 43 by opening batsman Naoomal Jaoomal in the second innings. It was the beginning of a new era of cricket in Kolkata, and Eden Gardens, the second-largest cricket stadium in the world, had become a place of pilgrimage for most cricketers as well as cricket-lovers.The picturesque ground is believed to have the most passionate and vocal cricket spectators. It is said that a cricketer’s cricketing education is not complete till he has played a game in front of a packed Eden Gardens.But, exactly 77 years after the historic test match, people of Kolkata have now again been subjected to humiliation in the Eden Gardens. The International Cricket Council ( ICC) has dropped the crucial India- England match, scheduled to be held on February 27 in Eden Gardens. Both India and England are favourites to win the ICC World Cup.The ICC officials found that the infrastructure in the Mecca of cricket in Asia is still not ready to host the crucial match on February 27. Repeated requests by the officials of Cricket Association of Bengal ( CAB) to the Board of Control for Cricket in India ( BCCI) and the ICC did not yield any consideration.The entire state of West Bengal has been embarrassed because of ICC’s decision. All the Kolkata- based newspapers carried headline stories on the issue, describing that the World Cup fever is totally lost in Bengal even before a single ball is bowled.All the satellite television channels too have been airing headlines and debates on the ICC’s decision to shift the India- England match. Some even alleged that ICC president Sharad Pawar, who is a minister in the United Progressive Alliance government, is desperate to project Eden Gardens in poor light because West Bengal is ruled by the Left Front.As West Bengal is poll- bound, common people are worried that the crucial India- England match in Kolkata should not be a victim of political one- upmanship.Fortunately, railway minister Mamata Banerjee, so far, has not made any attempt to politicise the Eden Gardens issue.Humiliated with the ICC decision, West Bengal chief minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee promised all possible help to the CAB to retain the crucial India- England match in Eden Gardens.He said it is a ” major setback” for the cricket- loving people of the state.Even sports minister Kanti Ganguly held meetings with CAB president Jagmohan Dalmiya to find out ways to retain the crucial tie in Kolkata, and put an end to the embarrassment to the state.Chuni Goswami, a great footballer, and former captain of the Bengal Ranji Trophy team said that the crisis over Eden Gardens was result of ” sheer lack of judgement”. He said the CAB should not have undertaken massive renovation works at the stadium.In recent times, Eden Gardens has not been getting international matches primarily because of CAB president Jagmohan Dalmiya’s hostility with BCCI honchos, including its president Shashank Manohar and ICC chief Sharad Pawar. The last oneday international here was played on December 24, 2009.Meanwhile, there has been strong demand by a section of the people to immediately remove CAB secretary Biswaroop Dey, and entrust former Team India captain Saurav Ganguly to handle the World Cup matches in Eden Gardens.In response to this demand, the chief minister has appointed the former India captain to liaison with Sharad Pawar for the World Cup preparations. Roads in several places in Kolkata were blocked by people in protest against the ICC decision.If ICC cancels the three other World Cup matches in Eden Garden, it would be the last nail in the coffin. In addition to the February 27 one- dayer, Eden Gardens is scheduled to host Ireland- Holland, South Africa- Ireland and Zimbabwe- Kenya matches.If the crucial India- England match is not held, will Kolkata be happy with the other matches? Can Eden Garden bail itself out of the crisis again?advertisementlast_img read more

Referees – Touch World Cup 2019

first_imgThe following referees are representing Australia at the 2019 Touch World Cup.The 2019 Touch World Cup will be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 28th April – 4th May 2019.REFEREESTim Ah SeeDave BaggioVictor BaptistaBrian BlechyndenRobert BowenMatt ButlerTony CalabriaKenneth ChanAlec ClarkAnnabelle ConnollyDarren CouperBrett FreshwaterLachlan FreshwaterStephen LaingDean MacDonaldMatthew ManningLuke McKenzieGreg MyersDanielle NunnAaron SearstonAmanda SheekyAlanah SinclairKim SkellyBrad SmithAnthony SmithKathleen SpencePaul TesorieroMatt WatersAlison WattersNicole WestChris SchwerdtJohn ClarkPeter CrampAmanda DraperRenee` FlachJohn FrostIvan GiammarcoJoshua LittleScott MarshRobert McKayCraig McKeeBarry McNamaraMarcus MullerChristopher MurrayBarry NicholsTimothy PearsonFiona QuinnChris ReynoldsPaul RichardsonWilliam SladePaul SullivanGreg TaylorJohn TaylorBen HarrisPhil BalcombeMichael LandsbergVincent CostiganPat CostiganCampbell MuirGiancarlo LeungJordan RandleJason MillerLucas PattersonDaniel KustecRebecca RogersRichard NorrisPaul EdmondsonChris BensteadCameron TurnerVictor NaumovskiAdam HoganNicholas AltinNicole AlexanderCory WisemanKurtis SankeyREFEREE COACHESDave FieldChris DolahentyChris HarapaKen GoldenErene DevallLou TompkinsIan Matthewlast_img