Smoke scare forces aircraft to make emergency landing

first_imgKolkata: An aircraft of a private airline made an emergency landing at the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International (NSCBI) Airport in Kolkata on Monday night, after smoke was traced inside the cabin. While approaching the NSCBI Airport, smoke started spreading further inside the aircraft.Sources informed that on Monday night at around 10:40 pm, the Air Traffic Control (ATC) of NSCBI Airport received an SOS message from a flight coming from Ahmadabad via Jaipur. The pilot informed that due to some unknown reasons, smoke spread all over inside the aircraft. Passengers became panic stricken due to the smoke and some even had breathing problem. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeImmediately, ATC officials arranged for an emergency landing, with all the necessary system such as fire tenders, ambulances and other logistics in place. All other flight operations were halted for the time being. A few minutes later the flight safely landed at the airport. The 139 passengers on board were evacuated using a ‘slipper’ through the emergency exit. After evacuation, the aircraft was quarantined and taken to a safe distance. Later, engineers were called to check the aircraft. But no fault could be detected. Later, the flight was grounded till an overall check. According to airport sources, it would be checked again if there is any glitch. According to sources, engineers are working to detect the problem in the aircraft.last_img read more

Should US Visa Control Tighten Heres How Overseas Tech Firms Might React

first_imgNovember 28, 2016 How Success Happens Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. This story originally appeared on Reuters Anticipating a more protectionist U.S. technology visa program under a Donald Trump administration, India’s $150 billion IT services sector will speed up acquisitions in the United States and recruit more heavily from college campuses there.Indian companies including Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), Infosys and Wipro have long used H1-B skilled worker visas to fly computer engineers to the U.S., their largest overseas market, temporarily to service clients.Staff from those three companies accounted for around 86,000 new H1-B workers in 2005-14. The U.S. currently issues close to that number of H1-B visas each year.  President-elect Trump’s campaign rhetoric, and his pick for Attorney General of Senator Jeff Sessions, a long-time critic of the visa program, have many expecting a tighter regime.”The world over, there’s a lot of protectionism coming in and push back on immigration. Unfortunately, people are confusing immigration with a high-skilled temporary workforce, because we are really a temporary workforce,” said Pravin Rao, chief operating officer at Infosys, India’s second-largest information technology firm.While few expect a complete shutdown of skilled worker visas as Indian engineers are an established part of the fabric of Silicon Valley, and U.S. businesses depend on their cheaper IT and software solutions, any changes are likely to push up costs.And a more restrictive program would likely mean Indian IT firms sending fewer developers and engineers to the United States, and increasing campus recruitment there.”We have to accelerate hiring of locals if they are available, and start recruiting freshers from universities there,” said Infosys’ Rao, noting a shift from the traditional model of recruiting mainly experienced people in the U.S.”Now we have to get into a model where we will recruit freshers, train them and gradually deploy them, and this will increase our costs,” he said, noting Infosys typically recruits 500-700 people each quarter in the U.S. and Europe, around 80 percent of whom are locals.AcquisitionsTrump’s election win and Britain’s referendum vote to leave the European Union are headwinds for India’s IT sector, as clients such as big U.S. and British banks and insurers hold off on spending while the dust settles.In India’s IT hub of Bengaluru and the financial capital Mumbai, executives expect a Trump administration to raise the minimum wage for foreign workers, pressuring already squeezed margins.Buying U.S. companies would help Indian IT firms build their local headcount, increase their on-the-ground presence in key markets and help counter any protectionist regulations.Indian software services companies have invested more than $2 billion in the United States in the past five years. North America accounts for more than half of the sector’s revenue.”We have to accelerate acquisitions,” said Rao at Infosys, which in the past two years has bought companies including U.S.-based Noah Consulting and Kallidus Technologies.Jatin Dalal, Wipro’s chief financial officer, said his growth strategy is to buy companies that offer something beyond what Wipro already does, or new, disruptive firms — such as Appirio, a U.S. cloud services firm.The chief executive of Tech Mahindra, C.P. Gurnani, said his firm, which two years ago bought network services management firm Lightbridge Communications Corp., is on the look-out for more U.S. acquisitions, particularly in healthcare and fintech — financial technology firms that are disrupting traditional banking services.Offshoring and automationIn a broader shift from labor intensive onsite projects, Indian IT firms are also turning to higher-tech services such as automation, cloud computing and artificial intelligence (AI) platforms.With better technology and faster networks, IT firms are encouraging Western clients to adopt more virtual services.Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka says he has focused on automation and AI as growth drivers since 2014. “The AI platform is 5-6 percent of our revenues,” he told Reuters. “Three years ago, it was zero.”More automation would mean fewer onshore developers.”The ‘Plan B’ would be to accelerate the trend … to reduce their reliance on people and increase their focus on delivering automation, leveraging the cloud for their clients,” said Partha Iyengar, Gartner’s head of research in India.(Reporting by Sankalp Phartiyal and Euan Rocha in BENGALURU and MUMBAI, with additional by Arno Schuetze in FRANKFURT; Editing by Ian Geoghegan) 4 min read Listen Nowlast_img read more

Googlers for ending forced arbitration a public awareness social media campaign for

first_imgThere seems to be a running battle between Google and its employees for quite some time now. A group of Google employees announced yesterday that they’re launching a public awareness social media campaign from 9 AM to 6 PM EST today. The group, called, ‘Googlers for ending forced arbitration’ aims to educate people about the forced arbitration policy via Instagram and Twitter where they will also share their experiences about the same with the world. The group has researched their fellow tech employees, academic institutions, labour attorneys, advocacy groups, etc as well as the contracts of around 30 major tech companies, as a part of its efforts. They also published a post on Medium, yesterday, stating that “ending forced arbitration is the gateway change needed to transparently address inequity in the workplace”. According to National Association of Consumer Advocates, “In forced arbitration, a company requires a consumer or employee to submit any dispute that may arise to binding arbitration as a condition of employment or buying a product or service. The employee or consumer is required to waive their right to sue, to participate in a class action lawsuit, or to appeal”. Demands for more transparency around Google’s sexual assault policies seems to have become a bone of contention for Google. For instance, two shareholders, namely, James Martin and two other pension funds sued Alphabet’s board members, last week, for protecting the top execs accused of sexual harassment. The lawsuit, which seeks major changes to Google’s corporate governance, also urges for more clarity surrounding Google’s policies. Similarly, Liz Fong Jones, developer advocate at Google Cloud platform, revealed earlier this month, that she’s planning to leave the firm due to Google showing lack of leadership in case of the demands made by employees during the Google walkout. It was back in November 2018 when over 20,000 Google employees organized Google “walkout for real change” and walked out of their offices along with temps and contractors to protest against the discrimination, racism, and sexual harassment encountered within Google. Google employees had made five demands as part of the walkout, including ending forced arbitration for all employees (including temps) in cases of sexual harassment and other forms of discrimination. Now, although Google announced that it’s ending its forced Arbitration policy as a response to the walkout (a move that was soon followed by Facebook) back in November, Google employees are not convinced. They argue that the announcement only made up for strong headlines, and did not actually do enough for the employees. The employees mentioned that there were “no meaningful gains for worker equity … nor any actual change in employee contracts or future offer letters (as of this publication, we have confirmed Google is still sending out offer letters with the old arbitration policy)”. Moreover, forced arbitration still exists in Google for cases involving other forms of workplace harassment and discrimination issues that are non-sexual in nature. Google has made the forced arbitration policy optional only for individual cases of sexual assault for full-time employees and still exists for class-action lawsuits and thousands of contractors who work for the company. Additionally, the employee contracts in the US still have the arbitration waiver in effect. “Our leadership team responded to our five original demands with a handful of partial policy changes. The other ‘changes’ they announced simply re-stated our current, ineffective practices or introduced extraneous measures that are irrelevant to bringing equity to the workplace”, mentions the group in a blog post on Medium. Follow the public awareness campaign on the group’s Instagram and Twitter accounts. Read Next Recode Decode #GoogleWalkout interview shows why data and evidence don’t always lead to right decisions in even the world’s most data-driven company Tech Workers Coalition volunteers talk unionization and solidarity in Silicon Valley BuzzFeed Report: Google’s sexual misconduct policy “does not apply retroactively to claims already compelled to arbitration”last_img read more