Peru In Haiti: Arms For Peace

first_imgBy Dialogo December 23, 2010 Congratulations on the written article, to only add that Peru has always been a country that loves peace and has always demonstrated this in its peace missions participation that have been internationally recognized for its excellent professionalism, high ability and acknowledgement on behalf of its participants. I believe that Peru with the experience gained will continue contributing with global Peace. The article on Juan Sebastian Verastegui Marchena is excellent, the Peruvian forces have always had a outstanding professionalism and efficiency in spite of few economic resources compared to other armed forces in the region; for the experience gained fighting internal subversion they are in line with the UN peacekeeping mission and international security. I had the opportunity to meet Peruvians serving in Haiti; like Minustah, who visited my country which is the Republic that borders Haiti on the same island. I can say without fear of misspeaking that they are a proper military, educated and full of humane values. Its work in our sister Haiti has been excellent and I congratulate the Peruvian Armed Forces for the preparedness of its soldiers. It was from our native island that Francisco Pizarro departed from in his conquest of Peru and we are united by a brotherly bond. I would hope that all of the other countries could count on such an Armed Force as prepared. More than six years have passed since MINUSTAH was established to replace the initial Multinational Interim Force that acted in response to the desperation of a Haiti exhausted by poverty, AIDS, political instability, corruption, and many uncontrollable ills that forced Jean Bertrand Aristide’s resignation from the presidency of the Caribbean nation. Since then, Latin America has done justice to its reputation as a region of peace by keeping the threat of a conventional war at a distance and at the same time, through the political agreement of its governments, contributing to the reconstruction of Haiti as a viable nation. This great challenge tested the capacity of the region’s countries to meet the demands of operations of this kind. South America responded well, with Brazil at the head of the mission, excellently complemented by the participation of Peru, Uruguay, Argentina, and Chile as well. The case of Peru is particularly significant, since it is the country in the region that spends least on arms, and in a true demonstration of its foreign policy, maintains a significant military contingent in Haiti as a message of cooperation and interest in promoting the peace and development of the peoples of the world. The Andean country’s participation in peacekeeping operations dates from 1958 in Lebanon (June to December). Afterward came Iraq (August 1988 – September 1989), Namibia (1989), Western Sahara (September 1991 – October 1992 and then 1998), the Democratic Republic of Congo (2000), Sierra Leone (2000), Eritrea and Ethiopia (2001-2002, 2003), and Cyprus (2003), in addition to innumerable exercises held in the United States, Argentina, and Chile. There are two kinds of peace operations, those known as observer missions and those known as peacekeeping forces. In the latter, Peru has been a pioneer in sending troops to carry out so noble a mission. A clear example of those is found in the fact that already in 1973, the Inca nation sent a numerous group of officers, cadets, non-commissioned officers, and enlisted personnel to the Middle East to form the UN Emergency Force, established by the Security Council during the Arab-Israeli conflict. The Peruvians made up the “Peru Battalion” and were part of the international contingent, which had Peruvian Gen. Gastón Ibáñez O’Brien as its General Commander of the UNEF II Sinai Sector until the middle of 1974. Later, another Peruvian, Gen. Luis Block Urban, would serve as General Commander of the MINURSO peacekeeping forces (referendum in Western Sahara). Starting in the 1970s, more than fourteen peace operations missions have been able to count on Peru’s valuable participation, from that celebrated “Peru Battalion” to the current missions in Liberia, Congo, Sudan, Ivory Coast, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and of course Haiti. Peruvian Women For Peace The efficiency demonstrated by the Peruvian Armed Forces in peace operations has made it possible to detect new needs for support in operations of this kind, such as, for example, the protection of children at risk, of women, and of the most vulnerable. The Peruvian government already has women serving as observers on its different peace missions sent to various parts of the world; nevertheless, deeply identified with the new needs observed in the course of its vast experience with operations of this kind, it has seen fit, starting in 2011, to send mixed military contingents to carry out the peace missions ordered by the international community. Capt. José Luis Delgado, head of peace operations at the Armed Forces Joint Command, estimates that at the end of this year or the beginning of 2011, women from the three branches that make up the Peruvian Armed Forces (Army, Navy, and Air Force) will have completed preparations, adding that the training given to this contingent will guarantee their excellent preparation for taking part in any kind of peace mission ordered by the United Nations. An Ongoing Commitment For more than fifty years, Peru has deeply identified with the UN mission of maintaining international peace and security. Throughout that period, it has deployed its best human and material resources toward obtaining that end, showing itself to be the global entity’s most immediate collaborator in defending the peace and resolving conflicts through peaceful means. As we have already detailed, not even the treacherous attack of Shining Path interrupted Peruvian participation in peace operations, as the country continued sending military observers to Iraq, Namibia, and Western Sahara. Following the defeat of this terrorist group, Peru considered itself ready to increase its participation in peace operations. Two factors were fundamental in this regard: its excellent professional experience and its pacifist vocation. The experience of defeating the world’s third-bloodiest terrorist movement and the impeccable participation of Peru’s Armed Forces in Operation “Chavin de Huantar” justified the prestige of Peruvian arms in the region, and it was necessary to contribute those experiences to the regional community. For their part, Peru’s pacifist vocation, its continuous rejection of the regional arms race, and its demonstrated international solidarity precipitated the government decision to increase the Peruvian presence in peace operations. This excellent decision has enabled its uninterrupted participation in MINUSTAH, to which it recently sent a new detachment of 216 military personnel, who will be stationed in Port-au-Prince. Familiar with the efficiency of the country’s contingents, the UN increased the number of Peruvian military personnel it needs in order to carry out aid work and provide border security in Haiti. For that purpose, the Peruvian Armed Forces maintain military contingents of two hundred men that are sent every six months to the four military bases they operate in Haiti. Three of the four military bases are located on the border with the Dominican Republic, and the fourth is in Port-au-Prince. In all four, the Peruvians carry out security tasks, border control, and highway and lake patrols and support the police in controlling smuggling and migration, in addition to working on social and humanitarian aid projects to improve the Haitian population’s quality of life. Through these effective actions, Peru demonstrates to the international community that the arms that the nation places in the hands of her favored sons and daughters are not only for conflict, but rather, fundamentally, for preserving and keeping peace in the world.last_img read more

Mansion sale: Luxury homes still hot property in Noosa despite coronavirus concerns

first_imgThis house at 33 Witta Circle, Noosa Sound, has sold for $10m.A LUXURIOUS waterfront home in one of Noosa’s most tightly-held pockets has fetched $10 million in a sign the coronavirus crisis is yet to impact the high-end property market.The six-bedroom, four-bathroom property at 33 Witta Circle on Noosa Sound is the latest in a string of eight figure sales in the popular seaside retreat so far this year.Records were smashed when a jawdropping beachfront penthouse at 8 Noosa Court sold for a whopping $14 million last month. MORE: Luxury homes still hot property Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 Coronavirus to drive lowest interest rates in Australian history Landlords, tenants confused over eviction moratorium Inside the house at 33 Witta Circle, Noosa Sound, which has sold for $10m.And selling agent Tom Offermann, principal of Tom Offermann Real Estate, does not see a slowdown happening due to COVID-19.In fact, Mr Offermann believes house hunters starved of choice in what has been a sellers’ market have been gifted an increase in buying opportunities. “Of course we are in unprecedented times, which every Australian is trying to navigate one day at a time, butit is important to bear in mind that real estate is a long-term investment and through times of hardship as well as prosperity, propertyhas emerged as the basis of all wealth,” Mr Offermann said.The front of the house at 33 Witta Circle, Noosa Sound, which has sold for $10m.“For buyers who have been starved of choice, there will be increased buying opportunities during this period of extreme measures we must all take to stay safe. “Our team has been busy working remotely since last week ready to help.”The sale of 33 Witta Circle was negotiated by Tom Offermann Real Estate’s Luke and Lauren Chen. The back deck and jetty at the house at 33 Witta Circle, Noosa Sound.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus9 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market9 hours agoIt’s their second sale in the street this year, setting a record for Noosa Sound as the first single allotment sale to reach eight figures — a far cry from the original land sale price of $12,000 in 1974.“We were deluged with inquiries and it’s fascinating how many well-known and highly successful people contacted us,” Mr Chen said. “The common attraction for them is that Witta Circle offers a waterfront lifestyle with boating options and it is only a couple of minutes walk from one of the most beautiful beaches in the world. “There is no other location that offers this. We had well over 100 inquiries, and many buyers who missed are waiting for the next opportunity.”Records show the property last sold for $3.35 million in 2014.Features include a two-storey glass foyer, polished concrete and timber finishes, an undercover outdoor terrace with a barbecue station, a timber jetty, a lap pool and a private beach.last_img read more

NWSA to Order Four More Container Cranes

first_imgThe Northwest Seaport Alliance has approved a USD 52 million purchase of four more container cranes to join four others already on order for Husky Terminal in the South Harbor.Additionally, the alliance approved of an additional investment of USD 2.9 million in Seattle and Tacoma terminal improvements at Terminal 18 in the North Harbor and the West Hylebos Log Yard and Pierce County Terminal in the South Harbor.“As the alliance, we can invest holistically in our facilities to ensure they remain competitive in this fast-changing industry,” Dick Marzano, co-chair of The Northwest Seaport Alliance, said.“These improvements will help us serve our customers better and continue to create the trade-related jobs so vital to our state,” Marzano added.The new cranes, to be built by Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industry (ZPMC) in China, will be capable of serving ultra-large container vessels with an outreach of 24 containers and a lift height of 165 feet above the pier deck.Construction is underway at Husky Terminal to reconstruct Pier 4 to align it with Pier 3, creating a contiguous 2,960-foot berth. These improvements will allow two 18,000-TEU ships to dock at the same time.The reconstructed berth will also include conduit for future shore power to allow ships to plug into electricity while at dock.Construction and the first four cranes are estimated to be concluded in 2018, and the additional four cranes are scheduled to arrive in 2019.last_img read more

Parents set bad example by staying glued to smartphones

first_imgNZ Herald 27 August 2014Parents who worry about their children constantly staring at their smartphones should set an example by not using their own devices so often – and set ground rules for screen-free mealtimes, parenting groups have said.The Government’s childhood star, Reg Bailey, told The Independent that British parents were letting “screens take over” and should talk to their children more often. He added that families needed to increase their “face-to-face” time and should gather around the dinner table rather than the television for meals.Suzie Hayman, a trustee of the parenting charity Parentline Plus and the author of How To Have A Happy Family Life, said families were “getting worse” at talking to one another and that the proliferation of smartphones and other devices was partly to blame.“It’s not just parents giving in to letting their children having more screen time – it’s also parents themselves,” she said. “If you ask a family what’s the first thing they do when they get home, they all admit it’s ‘Look at Facebook’, either on mobile phones or on laptops.Instead of sitting round the dining table chatting, what they’re doing is chatting with friends who are miles away. As a child, if your parents do it, then that’s your model.”http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11314534last_img read more