Maple Leaf reveals plans for Harvestime bakery

first_imgMaple Leaf Bakery UK says it plans to offer a range of bake-off products and sliced bread in the UK, following its acquisition of the £20m turnover former Harvestime (2005) plant bakery in Walsall last week.Welcoming the deal, UK MD Peter Maycock said: “All stakeholders, specifically our employees, customers and suppliers can take comfort from the fact the bakery now has the backing of the international Maple Leaf Foods organisation. We look forward to building the Walsall bakery back to a successful growth business with a long-term future.” Deputy MD Guy Hall told British Baker the asset purchase will allow the UK business to diversify its range. Maple Leaf Bakery, part of Canada’s largest food processing company Maple Leaf Foods, is currently best known for producing New York Bagel Company-branded bagels. It has three existing sites in the UK.Mr Hall commented: “We are primarily bagel bakers in this country. This acquisition is a strategic fit, and sits well with our ambition to be a broader supplier in the UK.” He emphasised the company will continue to produce sliced bread at the Walsall bakery. It plans to produce more premium sliced bread, and the Harvestime brand will continue to be used “in some capacity.” The 248 Harvestime employees at the site have been taken on in the deal, Mr Hall said.The Walsall bakery sale to Maple Leaf, announced on Friday, March 24, comes after only a week of talks with administrators, Guy Hall revealed. He commented: “We had looked at the business several months ago, but its business model is significantly different now. At the time it had a large direct- to-store delivery fleet and a less favourable product mix.”Mr Hall indicated that Maple Leaf Bakery UK plans to consider further opportunities for acquisition in the UK as they arise.Maple Leaf Bakery UK is based in South Yorkshire and makes bagels at its Rotherham bakery, pretzels at The Original Pretzel Co in Southend and other speciality bakery products in Cumbria.Harvestime (2005), formerly part of New Rathbones, had been in administration since November 2005, and previously in April 2005.John Kelly, joint administrator from Begbies Traynor said: “I am confident that the right purchaser has bought the business and the future of bread production in Walsall has been secured.”Analyst David Lang commented: “One would not imagine this will lead to pricing instability. It will fill a vacuum for private label.”last_img read more

People In Vermont Actually Voted For Jerry Garcia & Les Claypool For The President

first_imgLast week, the nation looked on as Donald J. Trump was elected to the office of the President of the United States of America. Many supporters of Hillary Clinton were beyond surprised that their candidate did not win, but it seems some Vermont voters were hoping for a different presidential option. A new report published in the Washington Post shows a list of the write-in votes from Vermont, and some of our favorite musicians happen to be on it.Check out this list of musicians who people actually voted for in Vermont.Willie Nelson (7 votes)Alice Cooper (2 votes)Jerry Garcia (2 votes)Bruce Springsteen (1 vote)Les Claypool (1 vote)Henry Rollins (1 vote)Eddie Van Halen (1 vote)Jim Morrison (1 vote)Neil Young (1 vote)Ted Nugent (1 vote)Jimmy “Buffet” (1 vote)Unfortunately, none of those musicians were elected to the office, probably because they weren’t running, or, in some instances, are no longer alive. Of course, this lighthearted article may take a more serious tone in four years if Kanye West makes good on his promise to run for the office in 2020…last_img read more

Bestselling author examines Jesus as historical figure

first_imgReza Aslan, internationally acclaimed writer and scholar of religions, explored the life of Jesus and the way it is viewed by modern society in a lecture titled “Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth” on Tuesday as the 2014 Christian Culture Lecture at Saint Mary’s.In his lecture, based off of his New York Times best-selling book by the same name, Aslan said there are differences between the historical Jesus and Jesus the Christ. He said these distinctions demand public attention because different cultures interpret Jesus differently based on their own traits and histories.“You see, this is the thing about the Christ of faith: he is in many ways an infinitely malleable thing,” Aslan said. “He can be whatever a community that worships needs him to be and he has been for the last 2,000 years.“He can take on any ethnicity, he can absorb any history you may have. He can take on any politics you may have … this isn’t just an artistic representation; it is much more than that. This isn’t just a figure to be represented, this is a person of worship, a source of emulation. There are thousands more [representations] I could have shown you. They are attempt by various Christian communities around the world make Jesus their own.”Aslan said he wanted his book to explain to a faith-based audience what consequences come from believing Jesus was fully divine and fully human.“Part of the reason I wrote this book is because I wanted to say in particular to a faith-based audience that there is a consequence to this belief,” Aslan said. “That whatever else Jesus was, God incarnate, whether he was the Messiah, the Son of God, whatever else he was, he was also a man.“There is a consequence to that because if he was also a man, then he was product of his time and place,” he said. “If he was also a man, then he was addressing very specific social ills. If he was also a man, he was addressing very specific religious and political powers. If he was also a man, he was also whatever else he was, deeply influenced by the world he lived.“And so it was the knowledge of that world which makes him extraordinary. Thinking of him in his humanity doesn’t take away what is special about him; it makes him even more special.”Aslan said the “bare bones” of Jesus’ story as a human being is what sets him apart from the rest of mankind.“You are talking about a poor — and when I say poor I mean poorest of the poor — a poor, marginal, uneducated, very likely illiterate Jewish peasant from the backwoods of Galilee, who nowadays would be referred to as a country bum,” Aslan said. “Who despite all of that, through the power of his teachings, the power of his charisma, managed to launch a movement on behalf of the poor and the weak, the marginalized, the dispossessed, women especially — a movement which was seen as such a threat to the largest empire the world had ever known, that he was hunted down like a criminal, arrested, tortured and executed for sedition.“I don’t know about you, but that is the most interesting man in the world to me. If I just told you that — don’t call him Jesus; call him Fred if you want — if I just told you this story about this guy, wouldn’t you want to know who that guy is? To me, it’s the humanity of Jesus that makes him extraordinary.”Aslan said distinguishing the difference between spiritual truth and historical fact when reading sacred scripture is crucial because in the ancient world the Gospel writers were not concerned with allowing the Gospels to be factual and historically accurate.“It is a very difficult thing for us in the modern world to understand because we read the Gospels like we are reading the history of Napoleon and that is not what we are reading,” Aslan said. “Sacred history is not history, and I truly and honestly believe — and this is true of all scripture whether you are talking about a Hebrew Bible, the Quran or the Gospel — I truly believe we would have a more peaceful civilization, that we ourselves would be more spiritually fulfilled, which is to stop focusing so hard on the facts of your scripture and focus on the truth of your scripture.” Tags: Christian Culture Lecture, Jesus, Reza Aslan, saint mary’s, SMClast_img read more

E.ON switches its 3 million U.K. residential customers to 100% renewables—at no extra cost

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:More than 3m homes are to automatically receive renewable energy from E.ON UK at no extra cost in one of the UK’s biggest green energy switches to date.The big six supplier says it will respond to rising public concern over the climate crisis by supplying its 3.3 million customers with 100% renewable electricity as standard.E.ON is one of the UK’s largest renewable energy generators and plans to draw from its own windfarms, biomass plants and solar projects to power the switch. It will also need to top up its portfolio by buying renewable “guarantee certificates”, which are sold by renewable energy developers to guarantee that a set amount of electricity has been generated from a specific project.Michael Lewis, the chief executive of E.ON UK, said the supplier has secured enough renewable energy to confidently meet the demand of its customers, even as the company undergoes a major corporate overhaul. E.ON is preparing to hand over its renewable energy portfolio to RWE in exchange for its energy network assets and supply businesses in a mega deal that is expected to be concluded by the end of the year.Lewis said E.ON’s customers will continue to receive renewable energy from its UK projects even after the assets are given to RWE. He said the switch is “an investment in our customer relationship”, which would also help “drive the market” for clean energy.More: E.ON UK to supply 3.3m customers with 100% renewable electricity E.ON switches its 3 million U.K. residential customers to 100% renewables—at no extra costlast_img read more

Hunter Henry seems excited for Chargers offense without Philip Rivers

first_imgHunter Henry is excited for life after Philip Rivers.In an interview with the San Diego Union-Tribune, the Los Angeles Chargers tight end opened up on the state of the LA offense and the next era of Chargers football. While Henry went out of his way to offer praise for his now former QB, it sounds like he’s ready for the next phase of the LA O. No one particularly blames the Chargers for moving on from Rivers, and with the league heading for more mobile quarterbacks with the ability to pass on the run, outside of the pocket, it’s no surprise to see Los Angeles want to hitch their wagon to a quarterback that fits that bill. While Henry went out of his way not to offer disrespect to Rivers, it still feels a little disrespectful, even if not his intent.After all, Rivers is three TDs shy of 400 for his career and passed for 4,615 yards last season, despite finishing with a disappointing 5-11 record. While the Chargers have been pretty average overall during the Rivers era, not all of that is on his shoulders.Obviously, the idea of having a multi-faceted quart is cool, but you still have to execute. So we’ll see if the new-look Chargers offense will, in fact, be better underneath either Taylor or Herbert than it was a potential Hall of Fame QB. “I’m not going to downplay Philip at all,” Henry told the San Diego Union-Tribune. “He was unreal and a Hall of Fame quarterback. But, obviously, it opens our offense up a little bit more. You see all these quarterbacks, their escapability in the pocket. …”[There are] so many different things that you can do with a mobile quarterback that can open your offense. [I’m] looking forward to seeing that aspect of our offense grow.”MORE: Mitchell Trubisky’s fate as Bears QB likely sealedRivers ranks high among the all-time great Charger QBs and is one of the top passers of this generation. If he had a ring, he’d likely be sure-fire bet for Canton. LA enters the 2020 NFL season with Tyrod Tyler the presumed starter, with No. 6 overall pick Justin Herbert entering his rookie year. last_img read more