The inquest into Brian Sinclairs death resumes

first_imgAPTN National NewsAPTN brought you in depth coverage during the four weeks of summer hearings at the inquest into the death of Brian Sinclair.Sinclair, 45, a double amputee, was found dead in a Winnipeg emergency room after waiting 34 hours to see a doctor.After a month-long break the hearings have resumed.APTN’s Shaneen Robinson has a review of what happened at the inquest.last_img

Exit Survey for TCI Visitors

first_img Three armed attacks in Provo, all in Blue Hills Related Items:exit survey, Gary Brough, KPMG, Tourist TCI: Savory favors investor residency status, heralds KPMG economic report, says Caicos link is economic lifeline Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 09 Oct 2014 — An exit survey for visitors to the country to report on their Turks and Caicos experience is just days away from starting now as the National Tourism Strategy consultant company, KPMG explains they are on the hunt for a tangible understanding of where the Turks and Caicos is, so that they can deliver on an overarching long term plan for tourism for the nation. Gary Brough, KPMG managing Director explained that since the launch of the project, KPMG’s team has been busy reviewing and critiquing previous studies and plans, researching and benchmarking the TCI against other jurisdictions and accumulating data and statistics. Add to this, Brough, who is also the leader for KPMG in Travel, Leisure and Tourism practice in the Caribbean explained that they want to hear from the general public on ideas for an enhanced tourism product. Consultation meetings are planned for this month also; those exit surveys will be for both airline and cruise departures. Recommended for you Local Atty says Govt going against public consultation; says NO to taller resort plan Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Study suggests women in biomedical sciences have equal chance of success in

center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More information: Lisa A. Hechtman et al. NIH funding longevity by gender, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1800615115AbstractWomen have achieved parity with men among biomedical science degree holders but remain underrepresented in academic positions. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the world’s largest public funder of biomedical research—receives less than one-third of its new grant applications from women. Correspondingly, women compose less than one-third of NIH research grantees, even though they are as successful as men in obtaining first-time grants. Our study examined women’s and men’s NIH funding trajectories over time (n = 34,770), exploring whether women remain funded at the same rate as men after receiving their first major research grants. A survival analysis demonstrated a slightly lower funding longevity for women. We next examined gender differences in application, review, and funding outcomes. Women individually held fewer grants, submitted fewer applications, and were less successful in renewing grants—factors that could lead to gender differences in funding longevity. Finally, two adjusted survival models that account for initial investigator characteristics or subsequent application behavior showed no gender differences, suggesting that the small observed longevity differences are affected by both sets of factors. Overall, given men’s and women’s generally comparable funding longevities, the data contradict the common assumption that women experience accelerated attrition compared with men across all career stages. Women’s likelihood of sustaining NIH funding may be better than commonly perceived. This suggests a need to explore women’s underrepresentation among initial NIH grantees, as well as their lower rates of new and renewal application submissions. Prior research has shown that despite receiving approximately half of all advanced degrees in the biomedical sciences, women are still vastly underrepresented in tenured positions at major universities. It has been suggested by some in the field that part of the reason for this disparity is the view held by many women who pursue advanced degrees that they will have limited opportunities should they pursue an academic career path. The researchers note that such a path generally involves becoming successful at applying for grants to carry out research. The researchers further suggest that many women believe this path is biased against women and thus choose to pursue careers in the corporate world as a more viable alternative. But are such beliefs justified? That is what the researchers sought to learn.To find out, the researchers ran queries on databases maintained by NIH that hold information regarding grants for the years 1991 through 2010. In so doing, they compared rates of success for first-time applicants as well as for those who apply for and receive grants repeatedly. They found that male first-time applicants far outnumbered female first-time applicants. But they also found that the rates of success for women who applied for and received grants repeatedly were much closer. And when they compared success rates by age and amount of education, they found that the rates were nearly identical for the two genders. The researchers suggest that this indicates that the so-called “leaky pipeline” is not applicable to women in the biomedical sciences. They further suggest that there is a degree of misinformation surrounding opportunities for women in the biomedical sciences and that more needs to be done to counteract it. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Murder of TMC worker Prime accused arrested

first_imgKolkata: The prime accused in connection with the murder of a Trinamool Congress worker in Cooch Behar was arrested on Saturday night from an area near the Indo-Bhutan border.Police said the arrested person, Avijit Barman, was behind the murder of Trinamool Congress worker Majid Ansari. It may be recalled that Majid was shot dead from a point black range on July 13. The police had earlier arrested five persons in this connection, but Avijit was at large. He was moving from one place to another. Finally, he had taken shelter in a hideout at the bordering Kumarganj area. He had chosen the bordering area to stay so that he could easily flee if police conducted raid to arrest him. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeActing on a tip off, a team comprising senior police officers went to Kumarganj and conducted a raid at the hideout. They found Avijit present there and arrested him. It may be recalled that Majid was attacked when he was returning from college. He was stopped at Chowpathy area by some people and shot at from a point blank range. Two bullets were fired at him. The first bullet had missed the target. But the second bullet hit him in the stomach. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedLocal people went to the spot hearing the sound of firing and found Majid lying in a pool of blood. Police went to the spot and took Majid to a hospital. He was finally admitted to a nursing home at Siliguri. He succumbed to his injuries after two weeks from the incident. Trinamool Congress leaders had demanded the arrest of the people involved in the incident and also organised a rally protesting against the murder of Majid. Police had initiated a case in this connection under several sections of the Indian Penal Code (IPC), including murder (302 IPC) and criminal conspiracy (120B IPC). Police initiated a probe and names of six persons including that of Avijit had cropped up, who was at large since the incident. They had arrested five persons and continued their investigation in search of Avijit.last_img read more