LHC to complete ophthalmology centre this year

first_img— plugs dialysis treatment into 2017 budgetChief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Linden Hospital Complex (LHC) in Linden, Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice), Dr Farouk Riyasat, has made the call for dialysis treatment, improvement in laboratory services, as well as some level of infrastructural upgrade at the medical institution. He made the call while delivering the 2016-2017 projections of the LHC during a consultation last week. In his projections, Dr Riyasat outlined several plans and areas in which improvements were needed at the LHC, which also comprises the Upper Demerara Hospital at Wismar, Linden, and the Kwakwani Hospital, Upper Berbice River.In his presentation, the CEO established the need for dialysis and oncology treatment centres, noting that there is staff who specialise in the oncology area and who have undergone training at the Georgetown Public Hospital; however, he said there is no room available for patients to receive chemotherapy. Due to this, he said patients would have to travel to Georgetown, which results in additional costs.“Dialysis treatment, this is very vital. We have had a proposal that I have presented to our LHC Board for consideration and we are all in agreement that we need at least to start with two beds for our patients to have dialysis done. Many patients who are going to Georgetown spend a lot of money privately to have the dialysis done, in transportation costs… so we are pursuing this aggressively… this also will be going into the budget for 2017… It is for us now to make sure as early as possible an oncology treatment centre, where those patients who are seen and discharged be treated right here as we have the staff and professionals”, the CEO noted. This year, Dr Riyasat noted, will see the completion of an operating theatre at former LHC for ophthalmology surgery, as well as another eye care ward for post ophthalmology patients.He also revealed the limitations as it relates to laboratory services due to unavailability of equipment and training. The establishment of a psychiatric ward will also be plugged into the 2017 budget, the CEO stated.Other areasDr Riyasat also pointed to the need to acquire two more specialists at the Hospital Complex, with one being an emergency medicine specialist. He said a proposal was sent to US Embassy for the setting up of a library and computer laboratory in the LHC lecture room for staff to conduct research, workplace training, data storage and analysis.This year, the CEO said extending the emergency unit and rehabilitation department is being looked at, at the Upper Demerara Hospital, in addition to upgrades to the laboratory, since there is need for a wider spectrum of tests to be done with regards to diagnostics. He added that there are issues with water pressure, storage and availability at the Upper Demerara Hospital and the LHC will be seeking to obtain a 20,000-gallon water reservoir below or above the surface, so that water can be pumped from the Guyana Water Inc mainline to water tanks. The CEO said since the Upper Demerara Hospital is situated on a hill, the water pressure takes a longer time to store. This, he noted, was also placed in the 2017 budget. Dr Riyasat also stressed the need for a 24-hour ambulance service at the Upper Demerara Hospital. He said presently there is an unavailability of drivers and requests were sent to the Public Health Ministry to employ more drivers. He also noted that suitable accommodation is needed to accommodate technical staff, such as laboratory technicians. The CEO further stressed the need for integrated services to avoid numerous additional visits by patients.This year, he said the Linden Hospital Complex will also be looking at the instillation of switchboards, the construction of an incinerator, and to have a stretch of road asphalted from the gate to hospital entrance. Repairs will also be done to ceiling and roof of the Upper Demerara Hospital.last_img read more

Plant Lignin Found in Red Algae

first_imgTime to rewrite the textbooks again.  The story of plant evolution is wrong.  Lignin, a chemical that gives wood its stiffness, was thought to be unique to land plants.  Now it has been found in red algae, reported Science Daily, with the title, “Billion-year Revision Of Plant Evolution Timeline May Stem From Discovery Of Lignin In Seaweed.”  This story illustrates that anything is possible in evolutionary biology these days.    According to evolutionists, red algae emerged much earlier than land plants.  How are they going to explain a complex molecule, which is manufactured by a complex process, being found in a more “primitive” life form?  “Because red and green algae likely diverged more than a billion years ago, the discovery of lignin in red algae suggests that the basic machinery for producing lignin may have existed long before algae moved to land.”  But that just seems to restate the problem.  The alternative, though, is even harder to swallow: “Alternatively, algae and land plants may have evolved the identical compound independently, after they diverged.”    The independent evolution of an identical compound in unrelated lines is tantamount to a miracle.  Look what Mark Denny of Stanford said about this: “The pathways, enzymes and genes that go into making this stuff are pretty complicated, so to come up with all those separately would be really, really amazing,”says Denny.  “Anything is possible, but that would be one hell of a coincidence.”Paper View: Denny’s statement warranted a further look at the original paper in Current Biology.1  Sure enough, the only two options were evolutionary, and neither was unproblematic.  “The discovery of polymerized hydroxycinnamyl alcohols (lignin) within the cell walls of a red alga has major evolutionary implications,” they said in a tone of understatement.  Either the ability to synthesize lignin emerged in a single-celled ancestor (with no need for the sturdiness of plant stems), or it emerged by convergent evolution in unrelated lineages.  “Because monolignol synthesis is exceptionally complex, it seems unlikely that Calliarthron [the red alga] and terrestrial plants evolved monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization completely independently,” they confessed (see 05/30/2008, bullet 2).  Why, then, did the title of their paper say this “reveals convergent evolution of cell-wall architecture”?  Perhaps there is a way to get the best of both explanations.  “It seems more likely that relevant pathways, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and polymerization by peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation, may be deeply conserved, having evolved prior to the divergence of red and green algae more than 1 billion years ago.”  If so, “we may expect to find conserved enzymatic pathways and, potentially, evidence of lignification among the multitude of evolutionary intermediates.”  The search is on.    Nevertheless, they did entertain the possibility that red algae and land plants converged on the highly-complex lignin pathways independently.  For support, they pointed to one other case of convergent evolution in lignin synthesis: “For example, angiosperms and the lycopod Selaginella synthesize S lignin via distinct and independently evolved cytochrome-P450-dependent monooxygenases, and production of S lignin in Calliarthron may reflect a third convergent pathway.”  This seems to beg the question that they evolved.  Perhaps two improbabilities are better than one, and three better than two.  Since nothing but evolution is allowed in the explanation, though, those are the choices.  Maybe imagining other uses for lignin in microbes will help:Lignins are thought to have evolved in the green algal lineage as adaptations to terrestrial habitats, facilitating hydraulic transport and contributing to the mechanical stability of upright stems.  However, contrary to the current paradigm, our data indicate that H, G, and S lignins exist within a red alga’s calcified cells that lack hydraulic vasculature and have little need for additional support.  We speculate that lignin biosynthetic pathways may have functioned in the common unicellular ancestor of red and green algae, protecting cells from microbial infection or UV radiation, and in Calliarthron, lignins may orient the fibrillar scaffolding that guides CaCO3 deposition.While we’re speculating, let’s imagine more with the long leash of evolutionary thinking.  There may have been other needs within brainless microbes that provided opportunities for evolutionary invention via “selective pressure.”The presence of G lignin within the secondary walls of peripheral genicular cells may represent convergent evolution of cellular architecture in response to mechanical stress, given that G lignins also concentrate within secondary walls of terrestrial plant fibers.  Selective pressures in the marine environment differ from those on land, but the wind-induced drag forces that presumably contributed to the evolution of wood in terrestrial plants are mirrored by flow-induced drag forces on aquatic algae.  On land, xylem lends mechanical support to erect stems, and in water, genicula provide mechanical support to Calliarthron fronds.  As articulated fronds bend back and forth under breaking waves, bending stresses are amplified within peripheral genicular tissue, which develops thick secondary walls, apparently to resist breakage…. We hypothesize that this putative 3- to 5-fold upregulation of lignin biosynthesis in peripheral genicular cells may be mechanically stimulated by bending stresses imposed by breaking waves.  Similar mechanical on/off switches for lignin accumulation have been noted in terrestrial systems: plants grown in microgravity synthesize less lignin, whereas plants grown in hypergravity synthesize more lignin.  The mechanical consequences of such minute quantities of lignin on genicular material properties may be negligible.  Nevertheless, that genicular tissue contains lignin and is also stronger, stiffer, and yet more extensible than other algal tissues is an intriguing coincidence, and lignin’s potential role in these properties is an area of active research.Their reasoning leaves out a key question.  Their evidence refers only to spots where lignin accumulates in response to mechanical stress.  How did it get there in the first place?  What does accumulation have to do with the origin of the lignin synthesis machinery?  They didn’t say.  The argument merely hints that an applied stress will somehow produce the goods.  Necessity is the mother of invention.    Having earlier admitted that lignin synthesis is “exceptionally complex,” it is perhaps surprising to hear them land on the side of convergent evolution in their concluding paragraph.  Their last sentence included overt teleological language:Convergent evolution of cell structure and development in Calliarthron genicula and terrestrial xylem may clarify lignin biosynthesis and lend insight into the early evolution of land plants.  It is striking that Calliarthron contains lignified cell walls but evolved from calcified ancestors that lacked water-conducting tracheids or vessels.  Vascular plants may have realized hydraulic transport by tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that initially evolved to fortify unicellular walls and were later adapted to provide biomechanical support.With funding from the National Science Foundation, Patrick Martone (co-author with Denny) is continuing work on this surprising discovery.  Science Daily ended, “Martone says the research team has started looking for billion-year-old lignin genes that might be shared among land plants and red algae, and has started exploring whether lignin exists in other aquatic algae and what role it plays in the evolution and function of aquatic plants.”1.  Martone, Estevez, Lu, Ruel, Denny, Somerville and Ralph, “Discovery of Lignin in Seaweed Reveals Convergent Evolution of Cell-Wall Architecture,” Current Biology, Volume 19, Issue 2, 27 January 2009, Pages 169-175, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2008.12.031.Darwinism is supposed to be this law-governed, enlightened, mechanistic, scientific theory that gives rational explanations for observed phenomena in nature.  Pray tell, what is the difference between their evolutionary explanation and that of a shaman?  We have just seen these scientists invoke spirits.  They called on the spirit of convergent evolution, the spirit of Tinker Bell, and the spirit of vascular plants tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that “initially evolved to fortify” cell walls of microbes.  These purpose-driven spirits produced lignin biosynthesis machinery on demand, just because of environmental stress.  Miraculous (see 03/25/2003).  “Anything is possible,” Denny said.  At least Christians have a sufficient Cause when they say, “With God, all things are possible.”    When you learn to look past the big words and identify the key passages in a scientific paper, it’s like taking your gaze off the Wizard of Oz act and pulling up the curtain where the charlatan is hiding.  A theory that says “anything can happen,” even coincidences that are “really, really amazing” can explain anything.  Is this enlightened?  Is this progressive?  Is this rational?  No matter what the observations, the Darwin Party has carte blanche to say “It evolved, because stuff happens” (09/15/2008).  To get really disgusted, read how the Astrobiology Magazine spun this finding in to a positive for evolution!  “The team’s finding provides a new perspective on the early evolution of lignified support tissues – such as wood – on land, since the seaweed tissues that are most stressed by waves crashing on shore appear to contain the most lignin, possibly contributing to mechanical support, says Martone.”  This is why we really need to end the one-party rule in science.  The Darwinists have done nothing to stop the rampant, blatant, out-of-control identity theft (05/02/2003) and credit fraud (08/24/2007) that is damaging the public trust (12/18/2002).(Visited 371 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ohio ag groups pushing for TPA

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio agricultural and commodity organizations recently urged Congressman Jim Jordan to support the reauthorization of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) for President Obama. Jordan has publicly shared that he won’t support the bill. With the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations taking placing, it is vitally important to agriculture for the President to have TPA.The Ohio Agribusiness Association, Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association, Ohio Dairy Producers Association, Ohio Farm Bureau, Ohio Pork Council, Ohio Poultry Association, and Ohio Soybean Association sent the following letter to Congressman Jordan.Trade is vital to the U.S. Economy, and especially important to Ohio’s number one industry: agriculture. Currently, Congress is debating important legislation that affects all Ohioans and our state’s farmers, and Ohio Agriculture is hopeful that Congressman Jim Jordan will be supportive of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA).TPA provides guidelines for politicians as they pursue trade agreements that support U.S. jobs, eliminate barriers in foreign markets and establish rules to stop unfair trade.The success of the food and agriculture sectors, both in Ohio and nationally, are heavily dependent on continued growth in exports; therefore, Ohio farmers are extremely interested in the passage of TPA. Productivity in agriculture far outpaces the domestic market’s ability to consume it, and the U.S. needs to continue to push for greater access to foreign markets; this is only possible through trade agreements and TPA.In 2014, Ohio sent $52.1 billion of goods to foreign destinations, as the result of more than 263,000 jobs supported by exports. Ohio is the 9th largest exporting state in the nation, sending goods to 216 countries and territories in 2014.Farm and food exports have a positive multiplier effect throughout the U.S. economy and Ohio’s. Every $1 in U.S. farm exports stimulates an additional $1.22 in business activity, according to USDA. Exports of $150.5 billion in 2014 therefore generated another $183.61 billion in economic activity in the U.S. bringing the total economic benefit to the economy to $334.11 billion.These exports were made possible through trade agreements, made possible themselves by the enactment of Trade Promotion Authority. TPA gave U.S. negotiators the ability to extract the best deals possible from other countries. Without it, no country would be willing to make the tough concessions– the ones that would most benefit us — if they fear that Congress will subsequently demand more. The success of trade agreements relies heavily on TPA.Rejecting TPA would not be free of serious consequences. Nations around the world are negotiating bilateral trade deals. If competitors gain free access to our biggest markets while we continue to face substantial import barriers, our markets will inevitably shrink. Standing still on trade puts the U.S. at risk of falling behind in the global marketplace. In short, trade agreements, such as those being negotiated with eleven other countries under the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and with the European Union under the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), cannot achieve U.S. goals without TPA.In the TPP talks, the Administration is working hard to complete a high-standard, 21st century deal that will eliminate barriers to our exports and raise standards within the TPP nations. Should Congress not pass TPA, that would send a clear and unfortunate message to our TPP partners and to the world, that we are turning our back on the fastest growing economic region in the world. The economic cost to the United States and to Ohio from a failed TPP would be more than lost opportunities; it could result in a real loss of exports, market shares and jobs.TPP is the most important regional trade negotiation ever undertaken. In order for TPP to become a reality, Congress needs to renew the TPA legislation. We strongly urge Congressman Jim Jordan to support Ohio’s economy and jobs by supporting TPA.last_img read more

Western bean cutworm issues

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Reports of ear feeding by western bean cutworm (WBC) have come in at a steady pace over the last few weeks. This is the third consecutive year that we have seen a fair amount of feeding, some of it likely has led to an economic loss. The heaviest feeding has occurred in the Northwest and Northeast corners of Ohio.While it is too late to spray or control at this point (since most larvae are protected in the ear and are getting ready to pupate anyway), growers may need to watch for the development of ear rots. WBC can leave entry or exit holes in the corn husk, which can then provide a nice wound for pathogens like Fusarium and Gibberella.  Some of these organisms can then be a further source for mycotoxins, including Fumonisins and deoxynivalenol, AKA vomitoxin.In some cases, damaged kernels will likely be colonized by opportunistic molds, meaning that the mold-causing fungi are just there because they gain easy access to the grain. However, in other cases, damaged ears may be colonized by fungi such as Fusarium, Gibberella and Aspergillus that produce harmful mycotoxins. Some molds that are associated with mycotoxins are easy to detect based on the color of the damaged areas. For instance reddish or pinkish molds are often cause by Gibberella zeae, a fungus know to be associated with several toxins, including vomitoxin. On the other hand, greenish molds may be caused by Aspergillus, which is known to be associated with aflatoxins, but not all green molds are caused by Aspergillus. The same can be said for whitish mold growth, some, but not all are caused by mycotoxin-producing fungi.So, since it is not always easy to tell which mold is associated with which fungus or which fungus produces mycotoxins, the safe thing to do is to avoid feeding moldy grain to livestock. Mycotoxins are harmful to animals — some animals are more sensitive to vomitoxin while others are more sensitive to Fumonisins, but it is quite possible for multiple toxins to be present in those damaged ears. If you have damaged ears and moldy grain, get it tested for mycotoxins before feeding to livestock, and if you absolutely have to use moldy grain, make sure it does not make up more than the recommended limit for the toxin detected and the animal being fed.last_img read more

6 Ways To Win Every Startup Competition You Enter

first_imgTags:#start#startups Related Posts tim devaney and tom stein How to Get Started in China and Have Success China and America want the AI Prize Title: Who …center_img OK. That’s an exaggeration. Odds are you can’t win every startup competition you enter. But you could win 92.59%. Candace Klein did. Klein is the founder and CEO of a new peer-to-peer lending platform called SoMoLend and she’s won 25 of the 27 startup competitions she’s (That’s a winning percentage of 92.59% – do the math). We asked her how she did it.Get A MentorMost startup competitions offer entrants the chance to connect with a mentor. Take it, says Klein, who has signed up for a mentor at every competition she’s won.“We’ve had media mentors who have gotten us press. I had one mentor who helped us negotiate a term sheet. Anyone entering a business plan competition should sign up for the mentorship. It’s a huge mistake not to.”Best of all, mentors are often on the competition’s panel of judges. So even if you don’t take home prize money, you will benefit from the free advice.Keep It SimpleIt’s easy to be complicated – to show up at your presentation and regurgitate the technical details at the heart of your innovation. That will not sway judges and investors.“Even if you have a complicated concept, you should make it understandable,” Klein says. “You get engineers and mathematicians who are starting companies and they get so bogged down in details they don’t do a good job of explaining what the business does. Make it simple, make it so a third-grader can understand.”Pack Your BagsKlein has entered and won competitions from Xavier University to the University of Dayton, where she took five of the five awards on offer. On May 10 she won best of show at FinovateSpring and the week before finished first at Business Insider’s Startup 2012.“The downside of participating in all these competitions is that it’s a tax on your time,” she says. “You have to be there in person. We drove to St. Louis six times for the Olin Cup competition at Washington University. We did win it but we had to be there on six different occasions.”Be YourselfYou’re not Mark Cuban. Don’t try to be. When you present at a startup competition, just be yourself, Klein says.“If you’re a funny person, be funny on stage. If you’re a storyteller, tell stories. If you’re a sweet person, be sweet. The judges want to believe in the jockey. The horse itself may be a concept they like or don’t like. They want the jockey. I know I raised money from people who liked me and not just my idea. They want to see you’re poised and confident and quick on your feet.”Klein is certainly confident. At 31, she’s won $500,000 dollars in prizes and raised over $1 million in angel and seed funding. She was born to a teenage mother, the oldest of five kids, and her father left when she was 5. She has four college degrees and has had ovarian cancer twice. (It’s now in remission.)Enter Plenty Of CompetitionsShe recommends that every startup enter at least five competitions. Even if you don’t win, you’ll learn how to pitch. “The reason I do all this is it gives me great practice for when I go in front of investors. It is intimidating and stressful but that’s a good thing. The second benefit is most of the judges at these competitions are also investors, people who are looking for deal flow.”But Avoid Those Without Prize MoneyObviously, Klein has entered far more than five competitions. But there are those she avoids: the ones that don’t offer prize money. She won’t sign up for any competitions that doesn’t promise at least $10,000 in prizes. And while she’s pocketed her share of cash, she’s won a lot of services as well, including six months’ free office space in New York and legal help from three different firms.“I don’t know if winning all these competitions will translate into a successful business. We’re still a startup. But what I will say is that I can articulate what my business does to anyone. I can sell the vision.”Klein recently launched her own startup competition, SoMoLaunch. First prize is $5,000 and consulting from Klein. She’s taking applications at SoMoLend.com until Sept. 30.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… How OKR’s Completely Transformed Our Culturelast_img read more

Create Unique Film Looks in Final Cut Pro X with mVintage

first_imgQuickly give your Final Cut Pro X projects a vintage look with the plug-in pack from MotionVFX!The effects gurus over at MotionVFX knock it out of the park with their newest plug-in release for Final Cut Pro X and Apple Motion.  mVintage is a complete effects solution for giving your digital video footage a distinct vintage look.Once you apply mVintage to your footage, you can modify the look of the retro film effects through it’s user interface within Final Cut Pro X.  Choose a preset from each of the main effect parameters: film burns, scratches and over 50 different color filters.  Each of these variables is customizable by adjusting it’s strength and blending mode (choose from add, screen or dodge).Once you nail down the main look, add additional vintage effects:Roll:  Mimics the look of a film projector, rolling your footage inDrop:  Drops frames for a low frame-rate or stop motion effectShake:  Jittery film camera shakePrism:  Offset the colors in your footageFlicker:  Adds a film camera light flicker ALL of the parameters are totally customizable, allowing you take the vintage look from subtle to EXTREME for a look that’s all your own. Although similar plug-ins exist, this one really excels in it’s processing speed and ease of use.If you’re a dedicated Final Cut Pro X or Motion user, adding this plug-in pack to your editing arsenal is a no-brainer.  With the popularity of Instagram, Hipstamatic and other retro image emulators, the vintage look is hotter than ever. The mVintage plug-in for Final Cut Pro X get it right for video projects.Download a demo risk-free or buy mVintage for $89.last_img read more

Fun in the Sun

first_imgWhat better way to celebrate the #AustraliaDay weekend than the Yass Valley Touch Football Knockout way!The 29th Yass Valley Touch Football Knockout, the largest of its kind in Australasia, was held last weekend 28–29 January. A final 112 teams were confirmed to compete for the $15,000 prizemoney: 44 mixed, 40 men’s and 28 women’s teams with several teams on standby due to capacity, such is the huge demand year-on-year!Walker Park Yass transformed into a camping fun park with players from across the world and the country camping out under the Southern Cross and stars and enjoying the social and fun side of our great sport. The BBQs, music and Aussie flags were in full swing with the odd mini pool and ice tubs to take the edge off the warm conditions.View the 29th Yass Touch Knockout Review and Image Gallery – bigger and better each year with the big 3-0 next year!Congratulations to all the winners and participants on a great tournament. Please see the results below. Related Files2017_yass_ko_flowcharts-pdfRelated LinksYass Knockoutlast_img read more

Gareth Bale transfer talks intensify ahead of a potential deal

first_imgMoves by Manchester United boss Jose Mourinho to strengthen his attacking options has intensified as contacts between him and Madrid Gareth Bale for a switch has reached top gear.Cristiano Ronaldo is reportedly lower down the target list and could find himself out of the picture if his team-mate heads to Old Trafford, according to Daily Star. Bale hinted at a move away from Real Madrid after his match-winning display in the 3-1 Champions League win against Liverpool.Mourinho is on the hunt for a new winger and, according to Don Balon, believes Bale would suit his system.After the Champions League final, Bale sparked speculation when he said: “I feel like I deserved to start because I’ve been playing very well.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“I’ve playing well since Christmas and any player would want to start.“For me personally, I feel I should be playing week in and week-out and I haven’t been.“I haven’t been playing as much as I would like and I’m going to have to sit down with everybody at a big table in the summer and seriously consider what move I’m going to make next.“I feel like there’s still a lot more to give for me and that’s why I need to be playing week-in and week-out, that’s what I need.”last_img read more

Marcos Llorente confident of Madrid future

first_imgReal Madrid midfielder Marcos Llorente has confirmed he would not be leaving the club this January transfer window.Llorente, 23, is now a regular in Solari’s side after impressing in a rare start away to Roma followed by seven successive starts for the club.The Spanish midfielder stepped in for the absent Casemiro and seems to be enjoying his role at Madrid“I’m sure I will stay, I’m really happy and I have no intention of leaving,” Llorente told reporters, as cited by Football Espana.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“It’s true that in life, like football, the situation can change from night to morning and you cannot lower your aims, you have to take advantage of your opportunities.“Man of the Match in the Club World Cup final? I’m happy to receive it, of course, to score the goal and win the final – now it is time to enjoy the moment.“We are trying to win all the titles, this was an important one as we were going for three consecutive titles and we have achieved it.“Now we have three more competitions this season that we will look to win.”last_img read more

Exit Survey for TCI Visitors

first_img Three armed attacks in Provo, all in Blue Hills Related Items:exit survey, Gary Brough, KPMG, Tourist TCI: Savory favors investor residency status, heralds KPMG economic report, says Caicos link is economic lifeline Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 09 Oct 2014 — An exit survey for visitors to the country to report on their Turks and Caicos experience is just days away from starting now as the National Tourism Strategy consultant company, KPMG explains they are on the hunt for a tangible understanding of where the Turks and Caicos is, so that they can deliver on an overarching long term plan for tourism for the nation. Gary Brough, KPMG managing Director explained that since the launch of the project, KPMG’s team has been busy reviewing and critiquing previous studies and plans, researching and benchmarking the TCI against other jurisdictions and accumulating data and statistics. Add to this, Brough, who is also the leader for KPMG in Travel, Leisure and Tourism practice in the Caribbean explained that they want to hear from the general public on ideas for an enhanced tourism product. Consultation meetings are planned for this month also; those exit surveys will be for both airline and cruise departures. Recommended for you Local Atty says Govt going against public consultation; says NO to taller resort plan Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more