If you’re thinking about building, now is the time

first_imgCM Master Builders MBA genericWITH land values low and tradesmen desperate for work, there has never been a better time to built, according to Acting Regional Director, HIA North Queensland Robert Harding.“It is clear that the North Queensland building industry is undergoing a tough time following the decline in the mining industry with approvals year on year for the December quarter down 21 per cent in Townsville, 31 per cent in Mackay, 21 per cent in Cairns and 20 per cent in Rockhampton,” he said.“While policy makers have made positive announcements to address the economic malice that has plagued the region in recent times, the underperformance of the residential building sector in 2016 indicates the urgent need for those policy decisions to be implemented without further delay.“In light of the fact that other regions on the east coast have seen record or near record levels of new home building in 2016 the question needs to be asked of the policy makers as to why North Queensland has failed to share in that housing cycle upswing.“It is clear that where that upswing has occurred residential building has generated a huge amount of economic activity and consequent employment.”More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:05Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenThe Converted: Boot Factory03:05 Related videos 03:05The Converted: Boot Factory00:43Best converted homes 201704:02The Converted: Butter Factory02:35Dream Home: Hawthorn00:39Average house? Wait till you see the extension!01:33Looks can be deceivingMr Harding said the upside the decline in approval figures was that for those intending to build or to enter the property market, there has never been a better time.“Trades are in ready supply and build times are short meaning mortgage payments during the build period are reduced,” he said.“Prices are competitive and this coupled with the stabilising of land prices as evidenced by this weeks Valuer Generals report mean there has never been a better time to build in North Queensland.“There is better news for builders engaged in the renovation market with activity in Queensland increasing by 11 per cent in 2017-2018 financial year and is forecast to continue in the subsequent year at a still healthy 7 per cent.”last_img read more

Freshman Halis brings excitement to young Orange

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 4, 2013 at 12:13 am Contact Josh: [email protected] Take even a slight glance at the Syracuse roster and one thing is immediately noticeable: no seniors. Instead, SU has relied on, and will rely on, a bevy of underclassmen in its first year in the tough Atlantic Coast Conference.Four freshmen have started in each of No. 17 Syracuse’s (2-0-0) two games this season, including Alex Halis, a shifty forward from Brampton, Ontario. The freshman has not only made an impression by scoring goals and dishing out assists, but he’s also brought excitement with an array of nifty moves and creative touches.“He’s a quality player,” SU head coach Ian McIntyre said. “He’s an exciting player. He’s a player that can make things happen and he can get people off their seats.”During Monday night’s home opener against Hartwick, Halis promptly introduced himself to the Colvin Street Elite, the group of student fans that sits near the net on East Colvin Street. The forward sped by defenders, put on the breaks and scanned the field. He also mixed in a few backward heel passes.Halis even made Hartwick senior midfielder Tim Crawford fall. The freshman Halis had possession just feet from the near sideline. His head and eyes went left, and so did Crawford. Halis’ body and the ball went right. The crowd “oohed” and “aahed.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAs Halis goes, McIntyre said, so does Syracuse.“That’s a good feeling,” Halis said. “It gives you confidence. But to me I feel like if everyone plays good, then it’s better for us. I don’t think it should be one player.”In both of SU’s games, Halis played a role in the team’s first goal. In SU’s season opener against Colgate – Halis’ collegiate debut – he headed in a ball from Jordan Murrell to give the Orange a 1-0 lead. Against Hartwick, Halis picked up an assist on Grant Chong’s goal early in the second half.McIntyre called Halis “cutting edge,” comparing him to Nick Perea, Stefanos Stamoulacatos and Emil Ekblom. McIntyre recruits the best players he can, but also the ones that fit his possession style that focuses on precision passing, ball control and creativity.Halis fits the mold. At 5 feet 9 inches tall, Halis can use his size to elude bigger defenders and his speed to get around them.In Canada, Halis led the St. Edmund Campion Bears to two straight OFSAA championships and an undefeated 33-0-1 season in 2012. He is also a member of the Canadian Youth National Program and represented Canada at the 2011 U-17 World Cup.“We’ve been playing together since we were just little kids,” said SU forward Chris Nanco, who played with Halis with St. Edmund Campion and FC Sigma. “We’ve always been together. We’ve created a bond since a young age and it’s a good thing to continue our careers together.”The connection between the two starters is one reason why the Orange has collected favorable results so far this season.In order to keep his personal success rolling, Halis said he has to stay positive and work hard.“He has that little bit of something different,” McIntyre said. “And it won’t always come off. That’s the nature of when you express yourself and when you try some things. But when it does come off, he’s an exciting player to watch.” Commentslast_img read more

Business fixated on housing

first_imgUNIVERSAL CITY – Local business leaders packed a hotel ballroom Thursday to hear an economic forecast about job rates and inflation, but home prices were what seemed to be on the tip of everybody’s tongue. Speakers at the 2007 San Fernando Valley Economic Summit at the Sheraton Universal Hotel focused on price declines (deeper in some areas), interest rates (look for an end-of-the-year adjustment) and how this housing downturn compares with those in the past (prices won’t fall as far). Five of eight breakout sessions addressed real estate. At one session, state Real Estate Commissioner Jeff Davi, who oversees licensing and regulation of real estate brokers and agents, said housing prices would inevitably inch up after the current cycle plays out. For the meantime, he saw one positive angle to level prices. “Housing prices staying flat are a good thing for businesses looking to hire people,” Davi said. At another session, panelists lamented a shrinking pool of industrial real estate and predicted shifts north to the Simi, Antelope and Central valleys. Industrial land is often also zoned for commercial, which fetches higher prices per square foot. “Industrial is going away unless something happens,” said John Degrinis, an executive at a commercial real estate organization, Collier International. The preoccupation with real estate is tied to what Valley companies said, during a survey, was the No. 1 issue they face: finding skilled workers. The survey polled 70 midsize businesses and was conducted by Davis Research as part of an annual economic forecast released Thursday from the San Fernando Valley Economic Research Center at California State University, Northridge. One-third of those surveyed said not being able to find enough employees topped their list of concerns, followed by 23 percent listing the rising cost of labor and health insurance. High residential real estate prices make it difficult for businesses to find a location where employees can afford to live. Long commutes, in turn, deter prospective workers and create a labor shortage. Debbie Kukta, vice president of Trojan Rivet Corp., said few of her employees can afford to live near the company’s factory in Glendale. Rivet has a task force to address the issue but there is little the company can do. “We try to pay them the highest wages we can,” Kukta said. But prices are “out of our control.” Douglas Snider sees another side to the story. As president of Wireless Applications & Management Corporation in Calabasas, he turns to regions with high housing prices because that’s where potential clients live. “For my target, it attracts the right clients,” Snider said. [email protected] (818) 713-3735last_img read more