Wenger explains Wilshire omission

first_imgArsenal manager Arsene Wenger said he left Jack Wilshere out of the starting line-up for his team’s victory at Fulham because the midfielder has still not fully recovered from an ankle injury.Wilshire came on a 71st-minute substitute at Craven Cottage, where’s Fulham’s Steve Sidwell was sent off.Wenger said: “Jack played on Saturday and Tuesday and he is still not completely recovered. He is not yet pain-free so I took the decision to rest him today.”Per Mertesacker’s first-half header was enough to see off Fulham and boost the Gunners’ hopes of a top-four finish.“It was a very important win for us. It was important for us to put the pressure on Tottenham and Chelsea today,” Wenger added.“It’s important for us to win all our games. We are on a strong run and now we most concentrate on the next one – Manchester United – which will be an intense game.”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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Size Doesn’t Matter

first_imgBy Kim CalominoNot to state the obvious, but the housing market is just that – a market. Homes come in countless varieties designed to meet the needs and wants of the countless types of buyers. If builders hope to sell houses, they must meet buyers’ demands.Which buyer a builder is targeting, however, doesn’t (or shouldn’t) define how a home is constructed. And at its most basic, it is how a home is constructed that determines if it is green — that’s how, not how big.A Continuum, Not an AbsoluteWhen the term “green” is used to describe a building, it shouldn’t be construed as an absolute. While some of us who have been working in the green building arena for a long time fret over the loose use of “green” — commonly termed greenwashing — I think we might also want to keep an eye on ourselves as well, lest our “green high horse” attitude leads us to shun all but the most pure.It is generally agreed that green building should address energy efficiency, resource conservation, durability, health, and comfort. Trying to address any or all of these attributes is typically an exercise in relativity: more energy efficient, durable and comfortable than what? Which resources and how much to conserve? What’s “healthy”?The practice of green building progresses along a continuum, so it makes sense for the builder to identify a baseline and move beyond that in a process of continuous improvement.Your Baseline Is Wherever You’re Starting FromWhat baseline? Code is one obvious, if not lofty, initial benchmark. Often the most challenging baseline to move beyond is the builder’s mind-set. But in practical terms, each builder has a natural baseline, regardless of product type: the builder’s current practice. For some builders, that baseline may already be well above code. In fact, some local regulators, wisely or unwisely, have already set about to define a local version of the green baseline.Because of the increasing visibility of various voluntary green rating systems, the market may actually be homing in on an agreed green baseline. The market (and hence the baseline) is also beginning to reflect a growing conviction by many Americans that we really do need to do something about our impact on the environment. Politicians, most notably President Obama, have finally provided some leadership, which will also tinker with baseline. But the continuum will remain.Okay, So What About Size?To argue that a large home cannot be green is to say that the baseline/continuum argument applies to some but not others. Most would agree that nearly anything that gets built could have been built greener, at least in some aspect. And certainly this applies to large homes as well.Of course there’s the resource argument: simply put, bigger buildings typically use more resources. But that tendency can and should be mitigated, even in large homes. If big was really the issue, there wouldn’t be green rating systems for schools, hospitals, or large office buildings. We’d only allow home-schools — small ones, of course — and small local retail shops. We’d limit office size and frown on large regional hospitals in favor of small local clinics. That would be silly.When I hear the question, “Can large homes be green?,” I think the questioner is really asking, “Is it right for some people use more resources — live in big homes — when they could live in smaller homes like the rest of us?” That question is not really about green building; it’s more about moral or social equity, and I don’t think the green building movement should dilute its focus by debating the issue. We need to get ALL buildings as far down the continuum as possible, as quickly as possible, rather than dither over the tiny minority of homes that are large.Unless the market for large homes just up and disappears, they’re going to get built and bought. There might be fewer of them, and they might be smaller, especially in these economic times. And heck, who knows, there might even be a permanent shift occurring right before our eyes. But let’s focus on getting those builders and buyers to move along the continuum, not argue about where the line gets drawn on size.Read an opposing viewlast_img read more

Apple Patents Destroy The Starship Enterprise [Video]

first_imgabraham hyatt Tags:#Apple#web Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Created by the guys behind @HAL9000_. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img

On a Positive Negative

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now It’s difficult to overthrow the status quo. People don’t change without good reason. The kind of gaps that give rise to change can be negative or positive.The survival of the company is the greatest possible dissatisfaction and threat a business will ever face. That’s framing the problem or challenge in the negative. And it’s dissatisfaction, plain and simple.Another form of dissatisfaction is a company not reaching it’s full potential because it isn’t capitalizing on the opportunities available to it. Even if you frame the capturing of those opportunities as a positive vision of the future instead of negative one.Missing your revenue goals is dissatisfaction stated in the negative (how else could it be stated, you might ask). The opportunity to capture revenue you might otherwise miss is the same form of dissatisfaction stated as a positive.Diminishing margins is identifying a gap in a way that is negative, and perhaps one that is easily indicated by concrete evidence. Increasing your margins is the identification of that same gap in a positive way.Dealing with the rising cost of doing business is framing a form of dissatisfaction in the negative. Identifying ways and opportunities to better contain costs, manage the supply chain, and produce greater efficiencies, is framing that same gap in a more positive way.Positive or NegativeShould you always speak about gaps in the negative? Should you always frame them in a way that rubs salt into the wound?Or should you always frame gaps in the positive? Are people more can compelled by a positive vision than they are by the negative consequences of not doing something about the gap?It’s easy to answer questions like these as if there are universals. But it’s more complicated than that. There isn’t one right answer. There is only effective and ineffective.Sometimes things that have worked for you in the past and suggest that they would work for you now fail to produce the results you want. Other times things that have failed for you in the past end up being just the ticket for achieving the result that you want.Being effective means being aware and making good judgments about what might work in the particular circumstance you’re dealing with right now. So do something about making better choices or lose more opportunities. Or, maybe, take advantage of this opportunity to produce even better results.QuestionsAre all of the gaps you find in your prospective clients negative?Do you always frame them in the negative?Are you proactive enough to find the positive gaps after you’ve helped your clients with the negative gaps that won you the business?Which language is more powerful in motivating you personally? Are you more prone to take action through your fear or your aspirations? Is this always true?last_img read more