Facebook, YouTube, TikTok, Others Fined Over $1 Million Each for Not Appointing a Turkey Representative

first_imgTurkey has ordered Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Periscope, YouTube and TikTok to pay TRY 10 million (roughly Rs. 9 crores) fines for failing to comply, Deputy Transport and Infrastructure Minister Omer Fatih Sayan tweeted.If the networks fail to open local offices by the start of December, they will be fined an additional 30 million lira.Failure to comply by early January would result in an advertising ban.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is one of the most popular leaders on social media with nearly 17 million followers and a very active presence.But under his government, Turks have faced increasing prosecution over their social media posts, especially those accused of insulting the president. Erdogan does not hide his disdain for social media, which he threatened to “wipe out” in 2014.The new law was adopted after Erdogan’s anger over online insults of Finance Minister Berat Albayrak and his wife Esra, the president’s daughter, following their fourth child’s birth in June.Turks are accustomed to limited access to websites and content, with Turkish courts submitting hundreds of content removal requests to Twitter over the past few years.Are iPhone 12 mini, HomePod mini the Perfect Apple Devices for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. Should the social media companies still ignore Turkish law three months after the advertising ban, they will see bandwidth reductions of 50 percent and then by as much as 90 percent in the fifth and final stage.Digital rights expert Yaman Akdeniz said any bandwidth reduction would start in April and reach 90 percent by May, making the platforms effectively inaccessible.Akdeniz tweeted on Tuesday that only the private Russian social media firm VK had appointed a Turkish representative to date.- Advertisement – Turkey on Wednesday fined Facebook, Twitter and three other social media companies for failing to appoint a country representative under a controversial law which came into force last month.The legislation, passed in July, requires platforms with more than one million users to appoint representatives in Turkey that could implement court orders to remove contentious content or face heavy fines.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Ericsson reverses UK charge in telecoms sector slowdown

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Half-time: Derby 1 QPR 0

first_imgQPR trail to a John Eustace header after a below-par first-half display against fellow promotion hopefuls Derby County.A draw would be good enough to take Rangers second in the Championship table but they have been second best for most of the opening period.They should have gone behind inside a minute, but some brilliant covering defending by Aaron Hughes stopped Patrick Bamford getting a shot away as the on-loan Chelsea striker dallied when clean through.After a lacklustre opening the R’s briefly looked like settling, with Joey Barton and Tom Carroll looking lively breaking from midfield.But Derby were playing with far greater tempo and created the better chances.R’s keeper Rob Green was forced into a fine reaction save to tip over a Clint Hill clearance that smashed against Jake Buxton and looked destined for the top corner.The pressure told when Green flapped away a Will Hughes corner and Eustace looped the ball into the net.Andy Johnson had a shot blocked for Rangers but the Rams looked comfortable in defence until the final stages when the visitors finally threatened.Derby keeper Lee Grant did well to push away a Gary O’Neil header but that was QPR’s only noteworthy chance.And the hosts could have gone 2-0 up in the final minute of the half when Green almost made a hash of a backpass with Bamford in close attendance.QPR: Green, Hughes, Dunne, Hill, Assou-Ekotto, Kranjcar, Carroll, Barton, O’Neil, Johnson, Doyle. Subs: Murphy, Traore, Onuoha, Jenas, Henry, Hoilett, Maiga.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Imran suggests fixing could be found in teams other than Pak

first_imgFormer Pakistan captain Imran Khan says it’s impossible to gauge the extent to which spot-fixing has spread worldwide and wants the International Cricket Council (ICC) to use innovative methods to investigate the whole issue and not limit it to only his country.The 1992 World Cup-winning captain feels that if it is proved that Pakistani players were actually involved in spot fixing in the series against England, they should be banned to set an example.”If what the News of The World [newspaper] has uncovered is spot fixing, then I am afraid it could be a lot more than what you could imagine because, clearly, it wasn’t the ICC investigations that uncovered these allegations. So, God knows how much of this goes on?” Imran told Headlines Today in an exclusive interview in New Delhi.”How can anyone tell whether someone has bowled no balls after being paid money or it’s an accident? In my opinion, there has to be a worldwide investigation into this because it could be widespread. It is impossible to detect. ICC has to come up with innovative ways of finding it out. If Pakistani players are involved, they must be punished,” he said.Asked specifically on allegations against some Pakistani players, Imran declined to jump the gun. “These are still allegations and a case is still going on.Natural justice demands that you are innocent until proven guilty. That’s why I am waiting for the verdict,” he averred.Kapil Dev, who led India to 1983 World Cup title, felt the ICC should properly channelise its resources to check corruption in the game. ” This World Cup [to be held in south Asia in February- April] will be very important for the ICC. It should play its role very carefully and very strongly. I personally would like to see Pakistan cricket come up. Whatever happened in the last six or eight months, we have pointed fingers on Pakistan,” he said.advertisement”But if ICC spends the right amount of time and money, these things can be sorted out. The authorities who are handling this and are deeply involved 24 hours [a day], they should see this as a challenge and say ‘ why things have landed up this far’. More important is that the ICC put together its heads and say, ‘we’ve to rectify everything with it’.” Arjuna Ranatunga, who captained Sri Lanka to an unexpected world title in 1996 and was part of the discussion, suggested that the ICC should involve former cricketers of integrity to assess the corruption in the game.”I personally feel that they [ICC’s Anti-Corruption and Security Unit sleuths] should go and see matches personally, ball by ball, and see what’s happening.The ACSU is run by top cops and they don’t know anything about cricket. You need to involve proper, honest cricketers to get them analyse these things,” he said.”When cricketers say something, they will probably mean that there’s something fishy. But a cop will maybe go and check their bank balances. You need to involve honest, proper cricketers who they [ match fixers] won’t be able to buy. That’s the easiest way to stop this [ malaise].” Imran felt that Pakistan is not just confronting spot fixing charges, but its entire cricket setup needs to be overhauled.”Unfortunately, it’s the way cricket is run. The president of the country appoints the cricket board chairman and that’s where things going wrong. The only qualification for the chairman is that the president likes him and he’s accountable to no one. Basically, it’s the ad hoc basis on which the team is run,” he said.”The moment the team loses, there’s pressure on the team. He [ board president] wants to do something … sacks the captain. We had five different captains in one year. You can’t have stability in the team if captains keep changing.” Asked if he was the right person to head the cricket board, Imran was sure his political opponents won’t let him clean the system. ” I know what the problems are in Pakistan. And I know if I am put in that position, I will not be able to function properly. I have political opponents in Pakistan and they would like to see me fail and would not let me succeed,” he said. Kapil was for Imran heading the board and even said Pakistan’s ” 80 per cent” problems would vanish if he was at the helm of cricketing affairs.Ranatunga disagreed and cited his own case to illustrate how politicians interfere in board’s working in the Indian subcontinent.advertisement”Imran can’t sort out PCB. I couldn’t sort out Sri Lankan cricket and I was there only for 11 months. I tried to stop corruption and I tried to set the cricket right and I was thrown out by a minister who was the most corrupt in the country,” he alleged.On Pakistan’s prospects at the World Cup, Imran felt that if pacers Mohammed Asif and Mohammed Amir are cleared of spot fixing charges, it would boost the team’s chances. ” If they play, Pakistan’s chances go up. They are outstanding. They are the sort of bowlers who will get early wickets. There are two ways of winning one-day matches – one is by containing runs, the other is by taking wickets. They can get wickets. That would give Pakistan a chance.”last_img read more