Adani Cancels $1.5 Billion Contract on Australian Mine Project

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Financial Times:Adani Group has cancelled a A$2bn (US$1.5bn) contract with a mining services company for work on its proposed Carmichael coal mine in Australia due to its failure to raise funds for the controversial project.The cancellation of the contract with Downer, an Australian company, on Monday is the latest challenge to hit the Indian conglomerate’s project, which has become a focal point for protesters over the role played by coal in causing climate change.It also follows a decision last week by the Queensland state government to veto a A$900m low-cost loan to Adani and the failure of Chinese investors to back the Carmichael mine.Adani said it remained committed to the A$16.5bn Carmichael project but planned to develop and run the mine on an owner-operator basis to achieve the “lowest quartile cost of production”.The Carmichael project has become a symbol of the global battle between environmentalists and the fossil fuel industry, attracting a series of legal challenges that have caused lengthy delays. The proposed mine sits in Queensland’s Galilee Basin, one of the world’s largest untapped coal resources.Adani’s board gave final approval for the mine in June. But raising money for the venture has so far proved an insurmountable challenge due to the decline in global coal markets and a vocal protest movement led by international environmental groups such as 350.org and Greenpeace.The project has become a litmus test on the future of coal, amid growing investor fears about whether increasingly onerous regulations on the emissions will create stranded assets.On Monday the world’s biggest coal terminal, Port of Newcastle, warned it needed to diversify and prepare for a future without coal.“It looks like another wheel has fallen off the Adani project,” said Tim Buckley, a director at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, an opponent of the Adani project. “With all of the Chinese banks ruling out involvement in the Carmichael proposal, deal funding has fallen over.”More: Adani cancels A$2bn Australia coal mine contract amid cash crunch Adani Cancels $1.5 Billion Contract on Australian Mine Projectlast_img read more

Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November

first_imgAttorney and Rep. Lois Frankel, D-West Palm Beach, faces Republican Cheryl A. Carpenter in November. Neither had a primary. October 1, 2000 Regular News Boca Raton attorney Steve Meyer was unsuccessful in a three-way Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Rep. William “Bill” Andrews, R-Delray Beach. Ocala attorney Judy Johnson won her two-way Democratic primary and is running against Republican Dennis K. Baxley on the general election ballot. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Stacy Ritter, D-Tamarac, faces Republican Joseph “Joe” Kaufman in November. Neither had a primary. Tallahasee attorney Joyce Dove and Cross City attorney Joseph Lander failed to make the runoff in a seven-member Democratic primary in a rural north-central Florida district. Attorney and Sen. Tom Rossin, D-West Palm Beach, faces Republican David Vaughan and a Reform Party candidate on the November ballot. Two other Bar members, Kevin Cannon of Orlando, and Rep. Luis E. Rojas, R-Miami, were unsuccessful in Republican primaries for two other seats. On the House side, lawyers are in five runoff primary races. In a Leon County district, attorney Lorranne Ausley faces Dr. Todd Patterson in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing a Republican nonlawyer in November. In a Lee County based district, attorney Jeff Kottcamp faces Marilyn Stout in the Republican runoff, with the winner facing a write-in candidate in November. Clearwater attorney John Carrasas is in the Republican runoff with Dave Miller, and the victor gaining the seat since only Republicans filed in that race. Boca Raton attorney Barry Silver faces Anne M. Gannon in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing write-in and minor party candidates in November. Boca Raton attorney and Rep. Curt Levine faces Irving Slosberg in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing a write-in candidate. In other primary races: Port Charlotte attorney Jerry Paul won a three-way Republican primary and faces a write-in candidate in November. Attorney and Democrat Kathy Castor was unopposed in the primary and faces Rep. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, winner of the Republican primary for a Tampa area seat. Tampa attorney and Democrat Betsy McCoy Benedict faces incumbent Rep. Sandra L. Murman, R-Tampa. Neither had a primary. Lakeland attorney and Republican Dennis A. Ross faces Democrat Coy W. Castleberry in November. Neither had a primary. Miami attorney Hector Rivera lost a three-way Republican primary that sent Rafeal Arza to Tallahassee, as no other candidates filed. Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November Both the Florida House and Senate will see some new legal faces among their members following fall elections, but whether the small number of lawyer-legislators increases in the 2000-02 term won’t be known until after November. A handful of lawyers, mostly incumbents but including some newcomers, have already won election as state representatives and senators. Others still face challenges in the October 3 primary runoff or the November 7 general elections. Among the new faces, Tampa attorney Arthenia L. Joyner, a long-time civic activist and former president of the National Bar Association, won her Democratic primary race and a House seat because no Republican or other candidate filed. Republican attorney Mark Mahon of Jacksonville defeated fellow attorney Charles McBurney in the primary to win a seat where no other candidates filed. Also in Jacksonville, Terry L. Fields defeated Jacksonville attorney A. Wellington Barlow in the Democratic primary to win a seat where no other candidate filed. In primary results, attorney and incumbent Rep. Gaston Cantens, R-Sweetwater, was reelected after defeating Robert J. Diaz in the Republican primary. Six incumbent attorneys in the House were returned without any opposition. They are former Bar Board of Governors member J. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, Christopher L. Smith, D-Ft. Lauderdale, Tim Ryan, D-Dania Beach, Kenneth Gottlieb, D-Miramar, Sally Heymann, D-North Miami Beach, and Marco Rubio, R-Miami. On the Senate side, veteran Rep. J. Alex Villalobos, R-Miami, will move to the other side of the Capitol rotunda as he filed unopposed for a Senate seat. Four other lawyer-senators filed for reelection and wound up unopposed. They are: John Laurent, R-Bartow, Burt Saunders, R-Naples, Steven A. Geller, D-Hallandale Beach, and former Bar Board of Governors member Walter G. “Skip” Campbell, D-Ft. Lauderdale. No lawyers won outright in the September primary in other Senate races, and lawyers remaining in those contests have opposition for the November election. No lawyers are involved in any primary runoff Senate campaigns. In those other upper chamber races: Miami attorney Tom David was unopposed in the Republican primary and faces Democrat Cindy Lerner in November. Spring Hill attorney Sabato DeVito was unsuccessful in a three-way Republican primary. Attorneys Edward Skinner Jones of Neptune Beach and Jeff Sneed of Atlantic Beach failed to make the Republican runoff in a four-way primary. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Carlos Lacasa, R-Miami, won a three-way Republican primary and faces a write-in candidate in November. Eighth Circuit State Attorney Rod Smith, a Democrat, won his primary for a Gainesville area seat and faces Republican Rep. Bob Casey in November. center_img Orlando attorney James Auffant had no Democratic primary opposition and faces Republican Jim Kallinger in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Gus Michael Bilirakis, R-Palm Harbor, had no primary and faces only write-in and independent candidates in November. Miami Beach attorney Dan Gelber won a three-way Democratic primary and is being challenged by an independent candidate in November. Winter Park attorney Stuart Buchanan did not have an opponent in his Democratic primary and will face the winner of a GOP runoff. Attorney and House Speaker-Designate Tom Feeney, R-Orlando, faces Democrat Glenda Conley in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Johnie Byrd, Jr., R-Plant City, faces Democrat John Wayne Clark in November. Neither had a primary. Ft. Lauderdale attorney and Democrat John P. “Jack” Seiler faces Republican Stephen M. Greep, Jr., in November. Neither had a primary. Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November Orlando attorney David Simmons won his two-way Republican primary and faces Democrat Ali Shahnami in November. Attorney and Democrat John Gillespie won the Democratic primary and the right to face Rep. Debby P. Sanderson, R-Ft. Lauderdale, for a Broward County seat. Bonifay attorney Roy Lake was unopposed in the Democratic primary and is running in the general election against Donald Brown, winner of the Republican primary. Palatka attorney Joe H. Pickens won a two-way Republican primary and faces Democrat Skeet Alford in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Larry Crow, R-Dunedin, had no primary and faces Democrat Sue Humphreys in November. Gainesville attorney Howard Rosenblatt was unsuccessful in a three-way Democratic primary. Democrat and Orlando attorney Ali Kirk Mashayekhi did not have a primary and faces incument Rep. Randy Johnson, R-Winter Garden, in November. Stuart attorney Joe Negron and incumbent Rep. Art Argenio defeated one other candidate to make the October 3 runoff. The winner faces a write-in candidate in November. All together, 48 attorneys filed to run in 44 House seats, and 11 attorneys filed to run in 11 different Senate races. (All 120 House seats are up for election and half of the 40 Senate seats.) After the first primary, 10 attorneys have been elected to the House, either because they were unopposed or had only primary opposition. Another five have been elected to the Senate for the same reasons. Four attorneys are still in the running for Senate seats, as are 25 attorneys for House seats. (Six attorney-senators are in the middle of their terms.) For the 1998-2000 session, there were 27 lawyers in the House and 13 in the Senate.last_img read more

So who won CFPB case?

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Republicans celebrated and consumer advocates have decried an Oct. 11 ruling that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is unconstitutional, but the ruling might actually derail Republican efforts to revamp the regulator.The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit found the regulator’s single-director leadership structure is unconstitutional.However, rather than suggesting adoption of a commission—something Republicans continue reading »last_img

5 ways the bureau can help credit unions now

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brandy Bruyere Brandy Bruyere, NCCO was named vice president of regulatory compliance in February 2017. In her role, Bruyere oversees NAFCU’s regulatory compliance team who help credit unions with a variety of … Web: www.nafcu.org Details Within the past year, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (BCFP) has gone through numerous changes reflecting new leadership. Many of these changes came as a result of reviewing various regulatory rulemakings that have had a significant impact on the credit union industry. NAFCU continues to fight on behalf of the credit union industry, as credit unions are still in need of additional relief. Here are five issues the bureau can immediately address to improve the regulatory environment. Remittance reliefSince 2013, when the bureau made changes to its remittance rule, NAFCU has been concerned about the rule’s highly burdensome compliance costs for credit unions.Responding to the bureau’s assessment of the rule last year, NAFCU asked that credit unions be exempted from the rule. “Numerous credit unions have been forced to stop offering remittance transfer services because the compliance burden is simply too high … With fewer credit unions continuing to provide such services, consumers’ options and ability to shop are severely limited,” NAFCU wrote to the bureau. Last year, the bureau said it would issue its assessment report by Oct. 28. Complaint databaseNAFCU has pressed the bureau to stop publicly publishing complaint information that cannot be fully verified in order to reduce the risk of reputational harm.In a recent letter to the bureau on the issue, NAFCU highlighted that credit unions take their member-owners’ issues seriously and work to resolve them efficiently and effectively, but that “current public reporting practices skew transparency and do not work as intended.” When unverified complaints are published on the bureau’s consumer complaint database, it “can pose serious reputational risks to targeted institutions.”NAFCU provided a list to the bureau of ways to improve consumer reporting practices, which can be read here. HMDA reliefWhile some Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) relief was passed into law as part of the NAFCU-backed Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (S. 2155), the association continues to push for more.A provision in S. 2155 would exempt depository institutions that have originated fewer than 500 open-end lines of credit and or fewer than 500 closed-end mortgages in the previous two years from certain HMDA reporting and recordkeeping requirements. The law also requires the Comptroller General to conduct a study to evaluate the HMDA amendments and submit a report on the results to Congress.The association has also asked that the bureau review its HMDA data collection activities, including limiting the collection to only those fields mandated under the Dodd-Frank Act. PALs safe harborIn May, the NCUA proposed NAFCU-sought changes to expand its payday alternative loans (PALs) program to offer a second PALs option – PALs II, and explore a third option – PALs III. NAFCU has long advocated for additional mechanisms to allow credit unions to provide more small-dollar, short-term loans to members in need, and also hosted a small-dollar lending working groupto explore additional small-dollar lending options for credit unions.NAFCU has asked the bureau to expand the safe harbor exemption to include all PALs loans not only to provide regulatory relief, but also to encourage more credit unions to begin or expand PALs programs. Qualified mortgage safe harborAs a result of the bureau’s ability-to-repay and qualified mortgage (QM) rules, many of NAFCU’s members have decided to extend only those mortgages that meet the definition of a QM because of the legal and regulatory risks associated with extending non-QMs.While recent changes to the Dodd-Frank Act have provided some relief with the addition of a new safe harbor category for loans held in portfolio, more can be done. NAFCU has recommended that the bureau reconsider the 2021 expiration of the temporary government-sponsored enterprise QM category, and make this category a permanent safe harbor exemption. Doing so would ensure that credit unions continue to have access to a healthy and functioning secondary market.last_img read more

Diversity and inclusion in the workplace Part II: The diversity scale

first_img This post is currently collecting data… This is placeholder text continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img We all come from different backgrounds and have had vastly different sets of experiences, and yet employees from every walk of life come together every day to collaborate and work toward the same goal of professional success. As a business leader, you probably already know that when you bring a diverse set of individuals together as a team, you bring in new ideas and perspectives as a result of combining different world views, cultures, nationalities, and experiences.According to SurveyMonkey, “Thirty-eight percent of the 12,543 working Americans surveyed said that diversity and inclusion is a high priority for their company, both for business reasons, and—more importantly—for ethical ones. More and more companies have set diversity and inclusion related goals and committed to pursuing a more balanced workforce.”Unfortunately, diversity and inclusion can be difficult qualities of a workplace culture to quantify. In this blog post, we’ll take a close look at the five levels of the diversity scale—discrimination, bias, tolerance, acceptance, and enthusiasm—and give you tips for cultivating a culture of acceptance and enthusiasm in your organization.last_img read more

Miranda Lambert Through the Years: ‘Nashville Star,’ Music, Marriages

first_imgMiranda Lambert has been unstoppable since she hit the music scene in 2003 as a contestant on Nashville Star. Since then, the country superstar has released seven solo albums, three albums with her group, Pistol Annies, and won countless awards for her undeniably catchy tunes.“I haven’t changed from Lindale at all,” she told Refinery29 in October 2019, referencing the Texas town where she was raised. “The only thing that has changed is that now I live in Nashville, I spend time in New York, and I have had a really amazing journey artistically so my career is on this path. Other than that, I’m still this same booze and jeans girl that I was before I left.”- Advertisement – Lambert’s marriage to Shelton ended in 2015, and she had two more high-profile relationships — with Anderson East then Evan Felker — before marrying police officer Brendan McLoughlin in 2019.“I met the love of my life. And we got hitched!” she gushed on Instagram at the time. “My heart is full. Thank you Brendan Mcloughlin for loving me for…. me. #theone.”Scroll down to see photos of Lambert through the years!- Advertisement – Lambert released her first album, Kerosene, in 2005. Six years later, she teamed up with fellow country singer-songwriters Ashley Monroe and Angaleena Presley to form Pistol Annies. The trio’s debut, Hell on Heels, hit stores on the heels of Lambert’s wedding to Blake Shelton.As her star continued to rise, the hitmaker’s personal life also became a hot topic.“I was a country singer in Nashville, and it was very comfy,” she told NPR in November 2019. “You had the right attention for the right reasons. And then the Hollywood thing came into the picture and it just threw me for a loop.”- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

The trendspotter

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Delancey in talks on two London stations

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Aaron Ramsey told he’s played his last game for Arsenal after devastating scan results

first_imgAdvertisement Comment Ramsey joins Juventus at the end of the season (Picture: Getty)However, the Sun claim that Ramsey’s injury is worse than first feared and specialists have confirmed to him that he will not play again this term.AdvertisementAdvertisementThe news is a devastating blow to Ramsey and to Arsenal fans, who had been desperate to see the midfielder in action again.Ramsey had hit good form before his injury and the Gunners have lost all three of their fixtures without him since he was sidelined.MORE: Watch pair of incredible flukes from David Gilbert and Kyren Wilson in Snooker World Championship quarter-final Aaron Ramsey told he’s played his last game for Arsenal after devastating scan results Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 30 Apr 2019 10:57 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link524Shares Aaron Ramsey has played his last game for Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Aaron Ramsey has been told he’s played his last game for Arsenal after scan results confirmed he will be out for around two months.The Welsh midfielder limped out of Arsenal’s second leg Europa League quarter-final clash against Napoli with a hamstring strain.Ramsey agreed a deal to join Juventus in January and departs Arsenal at the end of the season when his contract expires.The 27-year-old had been in a rich vein of form and had hoped to feature in Arsenal’s final league game of the season before a prospective Europa League final in Baku, Azerbaijan.ADVERTISEMENT Advertisementlast_img read more

​Danish schemes see returns moderating in 2020 after 15% last year

first_img“However, it is our clear expectation that the Danes will get used to more moderate returns in the next few years,” he said.PensionDanmark said it had been continuously adjusting its investment strategy in line with falling interest rates, and had increased its investment in renewable energy infrastructure, property and other assets.Anders Schelde, CIO of MP Pension, said his pension fund’s high return had been particularly driven by a very strong stock market, which had produced a 30% return alone in 2019.“But pretty much all of our investments had tailwinds,” he said, adding that even real estate, which was the poorest-performing asset class, ended the year with a 9% gain.With the US election due in 2020, geopolitical turmoil and a looming conflict in the Middle East, Schelde said it was very difficult to predict what would happen this year.“It is our clear expectation that the Danes will get used to more moderate returns in the next few years”Torben Möger Pedersen, chief executive officer of PensionDanmark“However, we are still confident and are aiming for a return in positive territory in 2020, but the risk of more extreme outcomes in both directions has increased,” he said.Between 2009 and 2019, MP Pension said it produced an average annual return of 9%.At Danica Pension, investment director Poul Kobberup said 2019 had gone well for the Danske Bank subsidiary’s customers, partly because of falling interest rates and partly on the back of equity price increases in the period.“At the same time, we at Danica Pension have stuck to our long-term strategy, and we have invested more of our customers’ pension savings into alternative investments, which for several years have produced good, stable returns – and in green investments,” he said.Kobberup said the pensions firm, therefore, expected to maintain its long-term strategic approach to the investment mix in 2020.“On top of a really good year in 2019, however, we will probably see more normal returns in 2020,” he warned. Pension funds in Denmark are publishing early reports of unusually high 2019 investment returns on the back of strong markets all round, while dampening expectations that last year’s success can be repeated in 2020.Labour-market pension fund PensionDanmark reported a 15.7% pre-tax return for scheme members with 15 years to retirement and a medium-risk investment profile in 2019, and the fund for academics, MP Pension, said its DKK16.4bn investment return for last year equated to a return of 15%.Meanwhile, Danica Pension – the country’s second biggest commercial pension fund – announced customers with low-risk profiles and five years to retirement received a 9.9% return for last year, while those with high-risk profiles and 30 years to retirement made a 25.5% gain.Torben Möger Pedersen, chief executive officer of PensionDanmark, said the 2019 return was equivalent to about three to four years of normal return in one year.last_img read more