STATE REP RACE QA Erin Buckley Explains Why Shes Running Describes Her

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Apple is asking weekly questions to the seven candidates running in contested primaries for the Wilmington/Tewksbury State Representative seat (19th Middlesex).Below, in her own words, are the responses to this week’s questions from candidate Erin Buckley (R-Tewksbury).#1) Why do you want to be our State Representative? (submitted by Mary Kiesinger of Wilmington)I want to have the privilege of being the State Representative for the 19th Middlesex because it is a position of vital importance for which no one would — or could — do a better job than I. I have worked in the State House, twice, once as an intern in the Governor’s Office and once as a Legislative Aide. I sit on Tewksbury’s Finance Committee and its Local Housing Partnership. I know, first hand, what it takes to do this job and I know what Tewksbury and Wilmington need from Beacon Hill. My goal is to streamline the communication between town hall and state house — and it is one I will achieve.#2) Do you consider yourself a liberal, conservative or moderate? Please describe your political ideology. (submitted by Danielle Driscoll of Tewksbury)I am a proud conservative. Where I fall within that umbrella term is also a position of personal pride: I am a classic libertarian. I believe in personal freedom and personal responsibility. I believe that government is here to engage in only the most essential duties that maintain a functioning society. I believe that government is there to help those who cannot help themselves, not those who can but won’t help themselves. I also believe that government is OF the people and FOR the people, and that the shift toward a ruling class of self-designated — or privately appointed — officials is setting both a dangerous and dysfunctional precedent.(NOTE: Do you have a question for the candidates? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com and it may be asked in a future Q&A or in a debate.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE: Voting Records Show Prinzivalli Voted Only Once Before Launching Candidacy; Campaign DisputesIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: 1 Candidate Drops Out, 8 Return Nomination Papers To State Before DeadlineIn “Government”BREAKING NEWS: 19th Middlesex State Rep Election Results Are In — Dave Robertson WinsIn “Government”last_img read more

Texas Hispanic Groups Sue Trump Administration Over Census Citizenship Question

first_imgMarjorie Kamys CoteraAt a press conference at the Texas Capitol, state Rep. César Blanco, D-El Paso, addresses the decision taken by the Trump Administration to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census.The Mexican American Legislative Caucus and the Texas Senate Hispanic Caucus are suing the Trump administration in hopes of blocking the addition of a citizenship question to the once-a-decade census of every person living in the United States.In a lawsuit filed Thursday in a Maryland-based federal court, the Texas-based groups allege that the addition of the controversial question is unconstitutional because it will lead to a disproportionate undercount of Latino and Asian residents, non-citizens and their family members.That undercount would endanger billions of dollars tied to social services funding and deprive those individuals of equal representation in the U.S. House and during the redrawing of political boundaries that follows each census count, the plaintiffs allege.The lawsuit against the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Commerce comes about two months after the Bureau announced it would add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census questionnaire. Since then, demographers, local officials and community organizers have been sounding the alarm about the role the question would play in depressing response rates among Texas immigrants and their families.Massive both in size and population, Texas has long been a hard-to-count state because of the millions of Texans who fall into the categories of people who pose the biggest challenges for the headcount — immigrants, college students, and children younger than 5 years old, to name a few.The lawsuit was filed on behalf of more than a dozen plaintiffs — including several Texas-based nonprofits that advocate for Latino residents and legislative Latino caucuses out of Arizona, Maryland and California — who say they are seeking to  “preserve the integrity” of the census count.The Trump administration’s “inclusion of a citizenship question in the 2020 decennial Census is arbitrary and capricious, an abuse of discretion, and otherwise not in accordance with law,” the plaintiffs wrote in their filing. They specifically allege that the inclusion of the citizenship question violates the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause because it is “motivated by racial animus” toward Latinos, Asians, non-citizens and immigrants. They also argue that the court should act to prevent the undercount that would result from the addition of the question, which would amount to a violation of the Enumerations and Apportionment Clauses.In announcing the addition of the citizenship question back in March, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross indicated the citizenship-related data was necessary for “more effective enforcement” of the federal Voting Rights Act.Those working toward an accurate count said they were already working from behind even before the Trump administration announced it would add the citizenship question to the questionnaire. They said they were bracing for challenges both practical — Hurricane Harvey displacement, internet accessibility and fewer funds with which to knock on doors — and political — namely anti-immigrant rhetoric and fears that people would be too afraid to respond to a government questionnaire — that would make Texas even tougher to count.An accurate census is critical to the state. It is used to determine how many representatives Texas is entitled to elect to Congress. And the Texas Legislature and local governments rely on the data to redraw corresponding political boundaries.The census also serves as a roadmap for the distribution of billions of federal dollars to the state and local communities, including funding for low-income housing, medical assistance and transportation projects.As they embark on preparations for the 2020 count, local officials have also stepped into the legal fight over the citizenship question in court. Earlier this month, three border counties — El Paso, Hidalgo and Cameron — joined a coalition of more than 30 states, cities and counties that has also sued to block the inclusion of the citizenship question. Meanwhile, the state’s Republican attorney general, Ken Paxton, has made clear he has no intention of fighting the question. In an op-ed published in March, Paxton chalked up concerns about the citizenship question as “partisan uproar” that is not “being driven by the facts.” The Census Bureau is still waiting for congressional approval of the 2020 questionnaire that includes the citizenship question. The bureau has not asked all households about citizenship since the 1950 census, though it does ask about citizenship as part of annual surveys that only cover a sample of U.S. residents. Sharelast_img read more