Big total key to Windies’ chances – coach West

first_imgDAMBULLA, Sri Lanka (CMC):West Indies A made a stuttering start to the opening unofficial one-day international (ODI) against Sri Lanka A before rain intervened to end play prematurely at the Rangiri Dambulla International Stadium here yesterday.Opting to bat first, the Caribbean side had reached 69 for two in the 13th over, with opener Kyle Hope unbeaten on 28 and Andre Fletcher on seven. The game will be concluded on today’s reserve day.Head coach Graeme West rued the weather interruption and said West Indies A would need to find their momentum again on what was a good batting track, if they were to put Sri Lanka A under pressure.”We got ourselves into a good position with some positive batting, and we’ll certainly need more of the same tomorrow,” West said afterwards.”It looks a good wicket, (there’s) not much happening for the spinners and it’s pretty slow for the quicks, so we need to build around Kyle Hope and Andre Fletcher … and set something up for some of the positive players to come later on in the innings and try and post something that will put the Sri Lankans under pressure.”They’ve certainly got an experienced and powerful top six themselves so we’ll certainly need a big score to put them under pressure.”The right-handed Hope put on 40 for the first wicket with Chadwick Walton, who made 16 from 12 balls with two fours and a six, before falling in the sixth over.Hope, who has counted four boundaries in a 39-ball innings, then added a further 23 with left-hander Assad Fudadin, who scored 14 off 10 deliveries with two fours and a six, before perishing in the eighth over.The game is the first of a three-match series against the hosts, with Jason Mohammed leading the unit.West Indies A, under the leadership of Shamarh Brooks, suffered a 2-1 defeat in the three-match, four-day Test series, which ended last week.last_img read more

Lawyer dubbed ‘Mr. Loophole’ wins speeding case for Beckham

first_imgSpotlight will be on Mbappe’s behavior as he returns for PSG Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum LATEST STORIES Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anewcenter_img Beckham’s lawyer Nick Freeman — nicknamed “Mr. Loophole” — argued that the notice arrived at Bentley Motors on Feb. 7, a day outside the statutory 14-day window.District Judge Barbara Barnes said the notice had been sent Feb. 2 and “more likely than not” did not arrive within the 14 days. She said therefore “the defendant in this case cannot be convicted.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissBeckham, the former Manchester United and England soccer star, did not attend Thursday’s hearing at Wimbledon Magistrates Court. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Former England footballer David Beckham speaks during a promotional event where he appeared as the global brand ambassador for insurance company AIA in Hong Kong on September 24, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Anthony WALLACELONDON — A London speeding case against former football star David Beckham was dropped Thursday after his lawyer successfully argued that notice of the intended prosecution had not been served within the legal deadline.Beckham was accused of driving a borrowed Bentley at 59 mph (95 kph) in a 40 mph (64 kph) zone in the Paddington area of London on Jan. 23. He had pleaded not guilty.ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View commentslast_img read more

Business fixated on housing

first_imgUNIVERSAL CITY – Local business leaders packed a hotel ballroom Thursday to hear an economic forecast about job rates and inflation, but home prices were what seemed to be on the tip of everybody’s tongue. Speakers at the 2007 San Fernando Valley Economic Summit at the Sheraton Universal Hotel focused on price declines (deeper in some areas), interest rates (look for an end-of-the-year adjustment) and how this housing downturn compares with those in the past (prices won’t fall as far). Five of eight breakout sessions addressed real estate. At one session, state Real Estate Commissioner Jeff Davi, who oversees licensing and regulation of real estate brokers and agents, said housing prices would inevitably inch up after the current cycle plays out. For the meantime, he saw one positive angle to level prices. “Housing prices staying flat are a good thing for businesses looking to hire people,” Davi said. At another session, panelists lamented a shrinking pool of industrial real estate and predicted shifts north to the Simi, Antelope and Central valleys. Industrial land is often also zoned for commercial, which fetches higher prices per square foot. “Industrial is going away unless something happens,” said John Degrinis, an executive at a commercial real estate organization, Collier International. The preoccupation with real estate is tied to what Valley companies said, during a survey, was the No. 1 issue they face: finding skilled workers. The survey polled 70 midsize businesses and was conducted by Davis Research as part of an annual economic forecast released Thursday from the San Fernando Valley Economic Research Center at California State University, Northridge. One-third of those surveyed said not being able to find enough employees topped their list of concerns, followed by 23 percent listing the rising cost of labor and health insurance. High residential real estate prices make it difficult for businesses to find a location where employees can afford to live. Long commutes, in turn, deter prospective workers and create a labor shortage. Debbie Kukta, vice president of Trojan Rivet Corp., said few of her employees can afford to live near the company’s factory in Glendale. Rivet has a task force to address the issue but there is little the company can do. “We try to pay them the highest wages we can,” Kukta said. But prices are “out of our control.” Douglas Snider sees another side to the story. As president of Wireless Applications & Management Corporation in Calabasas, he turns to regions with high housing prices because that’s where potential clients live. “For my target, it attracts the right clients,” Snider said. julia.scott@dailynews.com (818) 713-3735last_img read more