Ohio State baseball downs Eastern Michigan 81

Redshirt-junior 1st baseman and pitcher Josh Dezse (left) tags the runner during a game against Eastern Michigan April 8 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 8-1.Credit: James Grega Jr. / Lantern reporterOne of the most important things a team has to do to succeed is win the games they are supposed to win.The Ohio State baseball team has done that all season long, and Tuesday was no exception in its game against Eastern Michigan.OSU (19-13, 2-7) won its ninth straight non-conference game against EMU (10-19, 1-8) defeating the Eagles, 8-1. While the win was good for the team, coach Greg Beals said after two straight weekend sweeps losing against Indiana and Nebraska, he would still like to see his team play at a higher level.“I told the guys afterwards that I don’t think we played a whole lot better than we played over the weekend, we got more hits but you’re playing a Tuesday mid-week game, you’re going to get more hits than against a weekend rotation pitcher,” Beals said.The Buckeyes’ starting pitcher freshman Zach Farmer threw 7.0 innings, only allowing two hits and one run and tallying three strikeouts. The win gives Farmer a team-best fifth win of the season.“I just settled down and threw what I knew I had, I went through my mechanics slowly and I just threw fastballs in there for strikes,” Farmer said. “Everything was really on point today.”Although Farmer’s game isn’t perfect, Beals said he is pleased with the progression of his young pitcher.“He’s one of the best left-handed pitchers in the state of Ohio and that’s why we brought him here and we were fortunate to get him here,” Beals said. “He continues to develop, he still needs to work on controlling the running game, he still needs to work on just being a little more efficient, but other than that his stuff is dominating.”A leadoff triple by redshirt-sophomore utility infielder Nick Sergakis initiated a massive third inning to get the Buckeyes’ offense going. OSU produced five runs in the inning, including an RBI single by junior outfielder Pat Porter to score Sergakis.The offense did not let up in the next inning, scoring two more in the fourth after a two-run RBI single to right-field by redshirt-sophomore infielder Ryan Leffel, bringing the score to 7-1 in OSU’s favor.Porter, who had an impressive diving catch in right field in the ninth inning to accompany his three hits and one RBI at the plate, said he felt good about his performance against EMU.“I’m starting to finally get comfortable, I felt real comfortable tonight I just have to keep grinding it out,” Porter said. “My swings felt good all year, really it’s just seeing the ball up, taking advantage of mistakes and I did that really well tonight.”Beals said  Porter’s effort showed – diving for the ball is exactly what he wants to see from each of his players.“I don’t care how many hits he got, I’ll take that catch in the ninth innings of a seven-run game because that tells me how he’s playing, that tells me where he’s at— he’s locked in and he’s playing the game,” Beals said.After Leffel’s single, both teams’ bats got quiet – neither team would post a run until sophomore first baseman Zach Ratcliff hit an RBI single to give the Buckeyes their final run of the night.Freshman pitcher Curtiss Irving entered the game in relief of Farmer in the eighth, throwing two scoreless innings with one hit and three strikeouts.The Buckeyes are scheduled to return to action Wednesday at 6:35 p.m. against Dayton at Bill Davis Stadium. read more

Opinion 5 lesserknown Ohio State football upperclassmen to watch

3. Nick Vannett, redshirt-junior tight endMeyer has called senior tight end Jeff Heuerman one of the best in the country, but the OSU coach had praise for Vannett on Monday as well.“Nick Vannett has had as good of camp at tight end that I’ve seen, which is great for him to see him do that,” Meyer said.That’s pretty big praise, especially coming from a coach like Meyer, who has coached some extremely talented tight ends in his career. Heuerman, though, happens to be working through an injury heading into week one.Meyer said Heuerman isn’t 100 percent healthy yet, but he expects the tight end to play against Navy on Saturday.For Vannett, that could be the chance of a lifetime as he had eight receptions for 80 yards and one touchdown last season. Heuerman tallied 26 catches for 466 yards and four touchdowns in comparison.No matter how much Heuerman plays Saturday, look for Vannett to be a key contributor on offense, especially as a safety blanket for Barrett.If he plays well, Vannett could push Heuerman for touches all season. 1. Steve Miller, senior defensive linemanEven though some have dubbed OSU’s defensive line the best in the nation, that doesn’t mean the starting four will be the only players to see the field along the defensive front.In fact, one of those starters — junior defensive lineman Noah Spence — won’t see the field at all for the first two games of the season because of a three-game suspension. That’s where Steve Miller comes in.While he isn’t necessarily expected to start in place of Spence — coach Urban Meyer is expected to release the week one depth chart on Tuesday — he is one of the most experienced reserves on the defensive line. Steve Miller played in 11 games last season and totaled 12 tackles, three of which were sacks. Those three sacks caused the opposition to lose a total of 21 yards.Look for Steve Miller to be a key contributor not only while Spence is out, but for the rest of his senior season. 2. Darryl Baldwin, redshirt-senior offensive linemanBaldwin came to OSU as a standout defensive lineman, but he’ll be leaving as the starter at right tackle along the Buckeyes’ offensive line.The Solon, Ohio, native redshirted in 2010 before playing in seven games as a backup defensive lineman the following season. In 2012, he switched over to offense but played mainly on special teams and backed up All-American Jack Mewhort at left tackle the last two seasons.While two offensive line spots are still up for grabs, Meyer named Baldwin the starter on Barrett’s strong side going into his final season. Baldwin and his position-mates will be tasked with attempting to replicate the success of the 2013 offensive line, which graduated four starters — two of whom were selected in the NFL Draft in Mewhort and Corey Linsley while the other two, Andrew Norwell and Marcus Hall, were signed as undrafted free agents.If the Buckeyes want to replicate their success running the ball from 2013, Baldwin will need to have a big season on the offensive front. OSU senior offensive lineman Darryl Baldwin. Credit: Courtesy of OSUEverybody knows senior quarterback Braxton Miller, and now everyone the name of redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett. The 2014 Ohio State football roster is speckled with big-name players and former five-star recruits.But while some of those players will still be key to OSU this season, some previously lesser-known players could become household names for the Buckeye faithful this season.Here are five previously lesser-known and lightly-used players to watch on the OSU roster heading into the new season: 4. Tommy Schutt, junior defensive linemanAlong with Vannett, Meyer named Schutt as one of the most improved players on this Buckeye roster, even though he’s not expected to start with players such as senior Michael Bennett and junior Adolphus Washington ahead of him on the defensive line.What Schutt does bring to the table is depth, and if he’s getting praise like that from Meyer, he would probably be much more than a role player at most other schools.Schutt struggled with injuries in 2013 as he tallied just three tackles and 0.5 sacks in six games. The Glen Ellyn, Ill., native might have been limited last season, but he proved his talent as a true freshman in 2012 when he played in 10 games for the 12-0 Buckeyes.Barring injury, Schutt won’t get a starting nod this season, but he’ll see his fair share of the field and make an impact every time he’s out there. 5. Rashad Frazier, redshirt-senior defensive linemanAnother defensive lineman you ask? Yes, another defensive lineman.Of course Bennett, Spence, Washington and sophomore defensive lineman Joey Bosa will be the headline players, but they can’t play every snap.Going back to Spence’s suspension, Frazier could be the man to gain the most as he has been named as a potential replacement for the first two games of the season.After transferring to OSU from Purdue University in 2012, Frazier played in just one game last season while battling through injuries. He had a strong showing in the spring, capped off by a headline-stealing performance in OSU’s annual Spring Game on April 12.In the Spring Game, Frazier recovered a fumble in the end-zone for the first points of the game and totaled two sacks and a forced fumble. It might have been a practice game, but he was probably the most dominant defensive player for much of the day.If Frazier does in fact get the nod in Spence’s slot early this season, look for him to be playing with a chip on his shoulder as he gets his first and last shot at playing time. OSU’s season opener against Navy on Saturday at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore is set to kickoff at noon. read more

Chelsea and Sarri have agreed on the personal terms

first_imgChelsea have reportedly reached an agreement with current Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri when it comes to the personal terms.So far, Sarri has been keeping the position of the frontrunner in the race for the rule of Stamford Bridge as Conte is believed to be leaving as soon as possible, mostly due to problems with higher management and inconsistency of results.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.The Italian spent the last two years at Stamford Bridge. Despite leaving, he will be walking with his chin high – he managed to lead the team to win the FA Cup. However, the Blues will most likely have to cover 20 million euro – a compensation if they sack Conte before the contract ends as he intends to stay where he is right now.Sarri, on the other side, has a 9 million euro release clause with Napoli, but it is reported Chelsea do not plan to pay that fee and instead wait for the contract to expire as soon as the month ends, according to WhoScored.last_img read more

Salah posts injury update

first_imgMohamed Salah has taken to social media to update fans with some positive news on his injury ahead of the World CupThe 25-year-old was forced to leave the pitch within just half an hour of Liverpool’s Champions League final after his tangle with Ramos had caused a shoulder problem to arise with the Reds later struggling in his absence as Real Madrid sealed a 3-1 win.Since then, over half a million people have signed a petition urging the UEFA to punish Ramos over the incident.Salah is a potential doubt for Russia this summer with both Liverpool and Egypt confirming that his recovery from injury could make around three weeks.The Pharaohs’ first game against Uruguay on June 15 will mark their first appearance in football’s biggest stage in nearly three decades.Mohamed Salah, Sadio Mane, LiverpoolMo Salah laughs off Sadio Mane incident with a brilliant video Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Mohamed Salah laughed off his little spat with Liverpool team-mate Sadio Mane by posting a brilliant video showing they’ve made up.But Salah is staying positive on his progress and appears to be confident that he will be available for Egypt’s World Cup opener.“Good feelings,” Salah wrote alongside a photograph of him carrying out a stretching exercise on his damaged left shoulder.Good feelings… pic.twitter.com/Jhyd2kYVKI— Mohamed Salah (@MoSalah) June 3, 2018last_img read more

Marcos Llorente confident of Madrid future

first_imgReal Madrid midfielder Marcos Llorente has confirmed he would not be leaving the club this January transfer window.Llorente, 23, is now a regular in Solari’s side after impressing in a rare start away to Roma followed by seven successive starts for the club.The Spanish midfielder stepped in for the absent Casemiro and seems to be enjoying his role at Madrid“I’m sure I will stay, I’m really happy and I have no intention of leaving,” Llorente told reporters, as cited by Football Espana.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“It’s true that in life, like football, the situation can change from night to morning and you cannot lower your aims, you have to take advantage of your opportunities.“Man of the Match in the Club World Cup final? I’m happy to receive it, of course, to score the goal and win the final – now it is time to enjoy the moment.“We are trying to win all the titles, this was an important one as we were going for three consecutive titles and we have achieved it.“Now we have three more competitions this season that we will look to win.”last_img read more

Abbott Officially Calls Special Session Allowing Lawmakers To Begin Filing Bills

first_imgMarjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas TribuneGov. Greg Abbott lays out items for a special session at a press conference on June 6, 2017.Gov. Greg Abbott issued a declaration for a special session of the Texas Legislature Monday, formally inviting lawmakers back to Austin to pass “sunset legislation” that will keep several key state agencies open.The long-awaited procedural move allows lawmakers to begin filing bills for the special session set to begin on July 18. In addition to the formal declaration, Abbott also released a draft version of 19 additional items he plans to add to the special session agenda later on. Last month, Abbott announced that lawmakers would consider 20 total legislative items during the special session.Lawmakers’ failure to pass “sunset” legislation during this year’s 140-day regular session forced Abbott to call the special session. Absent that measure, government agencies including the Texas Medical Board, which licenses doctors across the state, will have to shut down.“With today’s proclamation, and with bill authors already lined up for all special session items, I look forward to working with the House and Senate to finish the people’s business,” Abbott said in a statement.During the special session, lawmakers will return to several controversial issues that deeply divided the state’s Republican leadership, including a so-called “bathroom bill” that seeks to restrict which bathrooms transgender Texans can use. In his unofficial supplemental call, Abbott described that issue as “legislation regarding the use of multi-occupancy showers, locker rooms, restrooms, and changing rooms.”Abbott also wants legislators to take on school finance reform, school choice for special needs students and several local control measures.Secretary of the Senate Patsy Spaw said her office received a copy of the proclamation around 11:00 a.m., which she forwarded to senators to alert them that they could begin filing bills. A physical copy of the proclamation was also delivered to senators’ offices in the Capitol building. No senate bills have yet been filed for the special session.Meanwhile the House, which has had an e-filing system in place for years, received over two dozen bills before 1:00 p.m.Robert Haney, the House chief clerk, said the first bill filed Monday, House Bill 41 from state Rep. Mike Schofield, R-Katy, was received at 11:42 a.m. The bill aims to change how the state calculates the constitutional spending limit, which restricts how much the budget can grow from one biennium to the next. Sharelast_img read more

Melanin from Jurassicera mollusk could lead to new tool for cancer diagnosis

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Eumelanin from the Jurassic-era fossil has a nearly identical pump-probe signature as the eumelanin from its modern counterpart, S. officinalis. The finding that eumelanin survives for millions of years opens the opportunity for pathologists to analyze the eumelanin from decades-old tissue samples of cancer patients in order to better understand the different characteristics of a melanoma that spreads versus a melanoma that does not spread. Credit: Mary Jane Simpson, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society The researchers, Mary Jane Simpson, et al., led by Professor Warren S. Warren at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, have published their paper on their analysis of Jurassic-aged eumelanin in a recent issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.”Melanoma is a particularly bad cancer if it metastasizes,” Warren told Phys.org. “Unfortunately, the ‘gold standard’ of conventional diagnostic techniques (essentially, excision followed by pathology) does not do a very good job of predicting which diagnosed cancers are likely to spread. So, how do you fix a bad gold standard for a bad disease?”The best answer is retrospective studies—looking at decades-old specimens from patients, where you know the outcome—and trying to find systematic differences. That is impossible with most pathology methods because the tissue degrades. Our results show that it is possible with melanin-based diagnostics, since the melanin easily survives that long.”The researchers explain that human skin has two types of melanin, eumelanin and pheomelanin. The distribution of these two types assists in the diagnosis of melanoma skin cancer. One way to identify the types of melanin and their distribution in a given sample is to use a molecular imaging technique called pump-probe microscopy. Basically, an ultrafast laser pulse is first used to “pump,” or optically excite, the molecules. Then after a short time delay, one or more follow-up pulses are emitted to “probe” the molecules. By measuring how the probe pulses are absorbed or reflected by the molecules, researchers can obtain a pump-probe signature that reveals information on the molecules’ excitation decay process. Since eumelanin and pheomelanin have different pump-probe signatures, this technique enables scientists to distinguish between them. Citation: Melanin from Jurassic-era mollusk could lead to new tool for cancer diagnosis (2013, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-melanin-jurassic-era-mollusk-tool-cancer.html Here, the researchers compared the pump-probe signatures of the eumelanin from the ink sack of a Jurassic-era cephalopod (an ancient molluscan marine animal) with that of a modern cephalopod, the common cuttlefish. (Despite its name, cuttlefish are mollusks, not fish.) Although the Jurassic-era cephalopod is 162 million years older than its modern counterpart, the eumelanin pump-probe signatures of the two animals are essentially identical. This finding shows that eumelanin is extremely stable, and could potentially permit researchers to image archived tissue samples from deceased cancer patients and uncover more information than could be obtained through more traditional methods that analyze other, less stable chemicals. Squid ink from Jurassic period identical to modern squid ink, study shows Journal information: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters The researchers pointed out that they did find some variations in the eumelanin signatures from the two mollusks. However, they could trace these variations to the larger iron content in the ancient eumelanin compared with the modern sample. Eumelanin from the common cuttlefish is normally bound to a variety of transition metals such as iron, copper, and manganese, but washing the eumelanin with the solid acid EDTA removes the majority of the bound metals. When the researchers washed the ancient eumelanin with EDTA, its signature closely matched that of the modern, mostly iron-free eumelanin. Because iron affects the pump-probe signature of eumelanin, the microscopy technique could also potentially enable researchers to approximate the iron content of a sample. For example, pigmented human tissue often exhibits a wide range of pump-probe signatures, and some of the variation may be due to metal ion binding by the melanin. In the future, pathologists may use this knowledge to their advantage when investigating the molecular composition of eumelanin samples. Explore further © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. More information: Mary Jane Simpson, et al. “Pump-Probe Microscopic Imaging of Jurassic-Aged Eumelanin.” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2013, 4, 1924-1927. DOI: 10.1021/jz4008036 Common cuttlefish. ©Jarek Tuszynski / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0 & GDFL (Phys.org) —In a world where things seem to change overnight, melanin seems to stay essentially the same for more than 160 million years, a new study has found. Melanin is the biological pigment that determines an animal’s color, and is currently not very well understood. In the new study, scientists have found that a type of melanin called eumelanin from a Jurassic-era mollusk produces a signature when optically excited that is nearly identical to that of the optically excited eumelanin from its modern counterpart, Sepia officinalis, or the common cuttlefish. Because melanin survives so long, an analysis of the melanin from old cancerous tissue samples could give researchers a useful tool for predicting the spread of melanoma skin cancer in humans.last_img read more

Researchers question Apolloera evidence for the Late Heavy Bombardment

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Application of laser microprobe technology to Apollo samples refines lunar impact history Explore further Citation: Researchers question Apollo-era evidence for the Late Heavy Bombardment (2016, October 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-10-apollo-era-evidence-late-heavy-bombardment.html Late Heavy Bombardment. One interpretation of lunar soil analysis suggests that four billion years ago the inner solar system was a violent place, gravitational perturbations of the orbits of the gas giants initiated a comet shower which in turn deflected many asteroids into the paths of the Earth and Moon. Erosion has removed most of the craters from the Earth but the Moon’s ancient landscape still bears the scars. Credit: Australian National University But these results are controversial—Apollo lunar samples represent only about 4 percent of the lunar surface and could thus have resulted from a single impact event rather than a more widespread bombardment episode. And due to lunar magnetism and overprinting from successive impacts, all of the Apollo-era lunar samples show evidence of 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum disturbances—in other words, the apparent ages of samples could have been “reset” by later impact events.So two researchers from the Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, recently reanalyzed the age spectra data from the Apollo samples in order to test the uniqueness of their impact histories. To do so, they used a physical model describing 40Ar* diffusive loss that accounted for age resetting of samples by subsequent impacts. The point of this reanalysis wasn’t to confirm or disconfirm the existence of the Late Heavy Bombardment, but rather to determine whether 40Ar/39Ar can even act as evidence for impact spikes. Their results, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, strongly suggest that episodic crust formation occurring more than 4 billion years ago, combined with 40Ar* loss due to a decrease in impact flux can create a bias in age compilations toward the illusion of an impact spike. “Our modeling shows that, due to the nature of declining impact rates and the early but episodic nature of crust formation on extraterrestrial bodies, apparent bombardment episodes can be a common artifact in 40Ar/39Ar plateau age histograms,” the authors write.They note that although the most widely cited evidence in favor of the LHB likely yields unreliable impact histories, their modeling does not preclude the occurrence of such events. However, determining impact histories will rely on future studies incorporating such techniques as in situ 40Ar/39Ar modeling and quantitative thermochronologic modeling. “Until such evidence is gathered,” the authors write, “we conclude that a monotonic decrease in impactor flux explains all existing 40Ar/39Ar data from both lunar and meteoritic samples.”center_img (Phys.org)—Many scientists believe that a cataclysmic series of impact events called the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) occurred around 4.1 to 3.9 billion years ago, during which there was a spike in asteroids colliding with the planets of the inner solar system. Among the possible explanations for the LHB is the migration of large planets to the outer solar system, disrupting objects in the asteroid belt and the Kuiper belt and flinging them toward the inner solar system.The Earth is constantly resurfaced by erosion and cratonic growth, and as a result, can’t contribute much geologic data about the existence of the LHB. Much of the evidence is therefore derived from the moon—specifically, from Apollo-era lunar samples returned to Earth in the 1960s and 1970s. Researchers used argon dating to determine age spectra of lunar rocks found in three major lunar basins. The so-called “plateau ages” of these rocks, as determined from 40Ar/39Ar age spectra, suggest a cluster of impacts approximately 3.9 billion years ago. More information: Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments. PNAS (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1611535113AbstractThe Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of 40Ar/39Ar “plateau” ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial 40Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of 40Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely. © 2016 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Protests in Ggn demanding justice for minor rape victim

first_imgPeople protested here on Thursday on the busy Mehrauli-Gurgaon road, demanding justice for a five-year-old girl, who was raped after being lured with the promise of a plate of chowmein.The girl, who is under treatment at Delhi’s Safdarjung hospital, was kidnapped from a function in Chakarpur and raped on March 29.People also blocked traffic near Bristol Chowk, and said the girl’s condition deteriorated as proper care was not being given at the hospital. Gurgaon Deputy Commissioner TL Satyaprakash, who visited the spot, assured the angry people that the girl would be shifted to Medanta the Medicity hospital in the city. The protesters demanded the suspension of Gurgaon’s chief medical officer, who referred the girl to Delhi. They also demanded the removal of inquiry officer Assistant Commissioner of Police Dharna Yadav, who allegedly misled the girl’s family saying that the arrested accused was a mentally disturbed person.last_img read more

Lightintensity exercise beneficial for older adults

first_imgFive hours a week of light-intensity exercise provide significant health benefits for people over age 65, suggests a new research.An easy walk, slow dancing, leisurely sports like table tennis, household chores and other light-intensity exercise may be nearly as effective as moderate or vigorous exercise for older adults, the study said.”You get a nice array of health benefits by doing five hours of light physical activity per week,” said co-author Brad Cardinal, professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. Light exercise is more appealing to people over 65, and such activities do not generally require the approval of a physician. The researchers examined data from the 2003 to 2006, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Older adults who participated in light-intensity exercise activities for 300 minutes or more were 18 percent healthier, overall, than peers who did not log that much light activity.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting'”These results highlight that, in addition to promoting moderate-intensity physical activity to older adults, we should not neglect the importance of engaging in lower-intensity, movement-based behaviours when the opportunity arises,” said author Paul Loprinzi, an assistant professor of exercise science and health promotion at the University of Mississippi.”For the average every-day person that is a much more palatable message than the current guidelines that emphasize moderate to vigorous exercise,” he said. The study was published in the journal American Journal of Health Promotion.last_img read more