LYIT SPORTS SCIENCE EXPERTS SET TO HELP ST EUNAN’S PLAYERS IN UNIQUE PROGRAMME

first_imgSt. Eunan’s GAA Club and the Sports Science Dept. at LYIT have entered into a partnership that will benefit both groups in the coming months and years.On Wednesday, the first two groups from the club, the U16 and Minor Boys footballers were put through their paces by the LYIT Sports Science staff and students with a Functional Movement Screening for each player.The screen will identify each players strengths and weaknesses with regards to agility, balance and co-ordination and the payers will then be given an individual programme to work to work to improve their techniques before being reassessed in 6 weeks’ time. Together with the new GAA Activate warm-up the St. Eunan’s club hope that this new partnership will lead to both injury prevention and also improved performance.Club coaching Officer Jim Clarke was at the forefront of this new initiative along with Head of Sports science, Dr. Lynn Ramsey and Ronan Doherty (Sports Science Lecturer).“We have been very impressed with the Sports Science now on offer here in Letterkenny at LYIT,” said Jim.“Sports Science now plays a huge part in preparing players and teams to get the best out of themselves performance wise and also through injury prevention. Obviously injuries cannot be avoided altogether but with the aid of science we can ensure we get players properly rehabbed and back on the playing fields quicker and in better condition. “The players will have to take on board their individual programme themselves as when they are reassessed it will very obvious who has or hasn’t done the work” Jim enthused.“This new relationship will work both ways as these students will have players that they can use for real data for their course work and projects and hopefully the club benefits both physically and mentally with better educated players who know what work is required to maximise their potential.“We will be rolling out the Functional Movement Screening with other teams through the course of the year and we are very excited to use the expertise that now exists in LYIT in a mutually beneficial partnership that we hope will last for many years to come,” he concluded.LYIT SPORTS SCIENCE EXPERTS SET TO HELP ST EUNAN’S PLAYERS IN UNIQUE PROGRAMME was last modified: February 27th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LYITsports sciencest eunanSt Eunan’s GAA clublast_img read more

Has Anti-Semitism Been Good for Jewish Evolution?

first_imgNational Geographic News gave favorable coverage to a controversial theory by anthropologists at University of Utah that anti-semitism was a form of natural selection.  The racism against Jews in Europe, while selecting for higher intelligence, also selected for certain types of diseases.  Reporter James Owen did point out that not all anthropologists agree with the hypothesis that IQ differences can have a genetic basis.That such poor reasoning and lousy science would get prominent coverage in the leading popular geographic magazine in the world is an illustration of the pernicious influence of evolutionary thinking on our society.  This hypothesis downplays the intellectual and moral factors involved.  Consistently followed, it would lead one to believe that anti-Semitism has been a good thing, if it led to the genius of Einstein.  If this kind of sloppy research, based on faulty assumptions and selective statistics, were published in some other field, it would be quickly scorned by academics.  The phrase “natural selection” is like a free pass around the security guards of science.  Should evolutionary anthropologists watch an Auschwitz as detached observers, measuring what genetic traits are being naturally selected by the process?  It’s time to call moral evils evil instead of rationalizing them on evolutionary grounds.  Let’s see how they explain it when the public has had enough, and there is a widespread outcry against Darwinian thinking.  Would that prove survival of the fittest ideas?(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Plant Lignin Found in Red Algae

first_imgTime to rewrite the textbooks again.  The story of plant evolution is wrong.  Lignin, a chemical that gives wood its stiffness, was thought to be unique to land plants.  Now it has been found in red algae, reported Science Daily, with the title, “Billion-year Revision Of Plant Evolution Timeline May Stem From Discovery Of Lignin In Seaweed.”  This story illustrates that anything is possible in evolutionary biology these days.    According to evolutionists, red algae emerged much earlier than land plants.  How are they going to explain a complex molecule, which is manufactured by a complex process, being found in a more “primitive” life form?  “Because red and green algae likely diverged more than a billion years ago, the discovery of lignin in red algae suggests that the basic machinery for producing lignin may have existed long before algae moved to land.”  But that just seems to restate the problem.  The alternative, though, is even harder to swallow: “Alternatively, algae and land plants may have evolved the identical compound independently, after they diverged.”    The independent evolution of an identical compound in unrelated lines is tantamount to a miracle.  Look what Mark Denny of Stanford said about this: “The pathways, enzymes and genes that go into making this stuff are pretty complicated, so to come up with all those separately would be really, really amazing,”says Denny.  “Anything is possible, but that would be one hell of a coincidence.”Paper View: Denny’s statement warranted a further look at the original paper in Current Biology.1  Sure enough, the only two options were evolutionary, and neither was unproblematic.  “The discovery of polymerized hydroxycinnamyl alcohols (lignin) within the cell walls of a red alga has major evolutionary implications,” they said in a tone of understatement.  Either the ability to synthesize lignin emerged in a single-celled ancestor (with no need for the sturdiness of plant stems), or it emerged by convergent evolution in unrelated lineages.  “Because monolignol synthesis is exceptionally complex, it seems unlikely that Calliarthron [the red alga] and terrestrial plants evolved monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization completely independently,” they confessed (see 05/30/2008, bullet 2).  Why, then, did the title of their paper say this “reveals convergent evolution of cell-wall architecture”?  Perhaps there is a way to get the best of both explanations.  “It seems more likely that relevant pathways, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and polymerization by peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation, may be deeply conserved, having evolved prior to the divergence of red and green algae more than 1 billion years ago.”  If so, “we may expect to find conserved enzymatic pathways and, potentially, evidence of lignification among the multitude of evolutionary intermediates.”  The search is on.    Nevertheless, they did entertain the possibility that red algae and land plants converged on the highly-complex lignin pathways independently.  For support, they pointed to one other case of convergent evolution in lignin synthesis: “For example, angiosperms and the lycopod Selaginella synthesize S lignin via distinct and independently evolved cytochrome-P450-dependent monooxygenases, and production of S lignin in Calliarthron may reflect a third convergent pathway.”  This seems to beg the question that they evolved.  Perhaps two improbabilities are better than one, and three better than two.  Since nothing but evolution is allowed in the explanation, though, those are the choices.  Maybe imagining other uses for lignin in microbes will help:Lignins are thought to have evolved in the green algal lineage as adaptations to terrestrial habitats, facilitating hydraulic transport and contributing to the mechanical stability of upright stems.  However, contrary to the current paradigm, our data indicate that H, G, and S lignins exist within a red alga’s calcified cells that lack hydraulic vasculature and have little need for additional support.  We speculate that lignin biosynthetic pathways may have functioned in the common unicellular ancestor of red and green algae, protecting cells from microbial infection or UV radiation, and in Calliarthron, lignins may orient the fibrillar scaffolding that guides CaCO3 deposition.While we’re speculating, let’s imagine more with the long leash of evolutionary thinking.  There may have been other needs within brainless microbes that provided opportunities for evolutionary invention via “selective pressure.”The presence of G lignin within the secondary walls of peripheral genicular cells may represent convergent evolution of cellular architecture in response to mechanical stress, given that G lignins also concentrate within secondary walls of terrestrial plant fibers.  Selective pressures in the marine environment differ from those on land, but the wind-induced drag forces that presumably contributed to the evolution of wood in terrestrial plants are mirrored by flow-induced drag forces on aquatic algae.  On land, xylem lends mechanical support to erect stems, and in water, genicula provide mechanical support to Calliarthron fronds.  As articulated fronds bend back and forth under breaking waves, bending stresses are amplified within peripheral genicular tissue, which develops thick secondary walls, apparently to resist breakage…. We hypothesize that this putative 3- to 5-fold upregulation of lignin biosynthesis in peripheral genicular cells may be mechanically stimulated by bending stresses imposed by breaking waves.  Similar mechanical on/off switches for lignin accumulation have been noted in terrestrial systems: plants grown in microgravity synthesize less lignin, whereas plants grown in hypergravity synthesize more lignin.  The mechanical consequences of such minute quantities of lignin on genicular material properties may be negligible.  Nevertheless, that genicular tissue contains lignin and is also stronger, stiffer, and yet more extensible than other algal tissues is an intriguing coincidence, and lignin’s potential role in these properties is an area of active research.Their reasoning leaves out a key question.  Their evidence refers only to spots where lignin accumulates in response to mechanical stress.  How did it get there in the first place?  What does accumulation have to do with the origin of the lignin synthesis machinery?  They didn’t say.  The argument merely hints that an applied stress will somehow produce the goods.  Necessity is the mother of invention.    Having earlier admitted that lignin synthesis is “exceptionally complex,” it is perhaps surprising to hear them land on the side of convergent evolution in their concluding paragraph.  Their last sentence included overt teleological language:Convergent evolution of cell structure and development in Calliarthron genicula and terrestrial xylem may clarify lignin biosynthesis and lend insight into the early evolution of land plants.  It is striking that Calliarthron contains lignified cell walls but evolved from calcified ancestors that lacked water-conducting tracheids or vessels.  Vascular plants may have realized hydraulic transport by tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that initially evolved to fortify unicellular walls and were later adapted to provide biomechanical support.With funding from the National Science Foundation, Patrick Martone (co-author with Denny) is continuing work on this surprising discovery.  Science Daily ended, “Martone says the research team has started looking for billion-year-old lignin genes that might be shared among land plants and red algae, and has started exploring whether lignin exists in other aquatic algae and what role it plays in the evolution and function of aquatic plants.”1.  Martone, Estevez, Lu, Ruel, Denny, Somerville and Ralph, “Discovery of Lignin in Seaweed Reveals Convergent Evolution of Cell-Wall Architecture,” Current Biology, Volume 19, Issue 2, 27 January 2009, Pages 169-175, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2008.12.031.Darwinism is supposed to be this law-governed, enlightened, mechanistic, scientific theory that gives rational explanations for observed phenomena in nature.  Pray tell, what is the difference between their evolutionary explanation and that of a shaman?  We have just seen these scientists invoke spirits.  They called on the spirit of convergent evolution, the spirit of Tinker Bell, and the spirit of vascular plants tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that “initially evolved to fortify” cell walls of microbes.  These purpose-driven spirits produced lignin biosynthesis machinery on demand, just because of environmental stress.  Miraculous (see 03/25/2003).  “Anything is possible,” Denny said.  At least Christians have a sufficient Cause when they say, “With God, all things are possible.”    When you learn to look past the big words and identify the key passages in a scientific paper, it’s like taking your gaze off the Wizard of Oz act and pulling up the curtain where the charlatan is hiding.  A theory that says “anything can happen,” even coincidences that are “really, really amazing” can explain anything.  Is this enlightened?  Is this progressive?  Is this rational?  No matter what the observations, the Darwin Party has carte blanche to say “It evolved, because stuff happens” (09/15/2008).  To get really disgusted, read how the Astrobiology Magazine spun this finding in to a positive for evolution!  “The team’s finding provides a new perspective on the early evolution of lignified support tissues – such as wood – on land, since the seaweed tissues that are most stressed by waves crashing on shore appear to contain the most lignin, possibly contributing to mechanical support, says Martone.”  This is why we really need to end the one-party rule in science.  The Darwinists have done nothing to stop the rampant, blatant, out-of-control identity theft (05/02/2003) and credit fraud (08/24/2007) that is damaging the public trust (12/18/2002).(Visited 371 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ivory Coast take on ice bucket challenge helps fight Ebola

first_imgIce-cold, soapy water … Ivorian Twitter celebrity Edith Brou’s Lather Against Ebola campaign encourages participants in the soap bucket challenge, an Ivorian variation of the ice bucket challenge, to donate bars of soap and bottles of antiseptic instead of cash. • Mobile phone boost to African internet • #BringBackOurGirls shows the power of social media in Africa • How Africa tweets • So this giraffe walks into a restaurant … and the video goes viral • Africa refocused: images of GhanaNdaba DlaminiIvory Coast is giving the global sensation of the ice bucket challenge a new – and educational – meaning as a way to spread the need for hygiene in the face of the deadly Ebola epidemic affecting its neighbours.A brainchild of one of Ivory Coast’s most prominent Twitter users, Edith Brou, the Lather Against Ebola campaign encourages participants in the “soap bucket challenge”, an Ivorian variation of the ice bucket challenge, to donate bars of soap and bottles of antiseptic instead of cash.The original ice bucket challenge was a hugely successful viral campaign in which people challenged their friends to film themselves pouring ice water over their heads. It has raised millions of dollars worldwide to fund research into a fatal degenerative nervous disorder called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The Lather Against Ebola campaign, with the French hashtag #MousserContreEbola, has gone viral on Twitter and Facebook in the West African region, helping raise awareness about a disease that has claimed thousands of lives in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.With 1.4-million Facebook users in Ivory Coast, the internet has played an increasingly important role in politics and society in the country.Brou kicked off the campaign in August this year, posting a video of herself standing on a balcony at her workplace in Abidjan. “Against Ebola, you need good hygiene,” she says in the video before a bucket of soapy, ice-cold water is dunked on her head by a friend.For her efforts, Brou’s video was an instant hit on social networks, garnering 4 000 hits. She then challenged three fellow bloggers including Nouho Bamba, who goes by the pseudonym La Rigueur Bino. Bamba claims to have 150 000 followers on social media.Subsequently, Bamba came up with his own soap bucket challenge video. In it, Bamba gets a little quirkier in his approach and throws himself – fully dressed in a business suit complete with suitcase in hand – in a swimming pool. The video got more than 52 000 hits.“I knew that jumping into a pool would create a buzz,” said Bamba. “Today, even children need to understand what Ebola is.”Besides being a critical tool to educate and raise awareness of Ebola, the soap bucket campaign is a good example of the power of social media to bring people together for a just cause, and also an opportunity for bloggers to showcase their popularity. One blogger, Israel Yoroba, has composed a song entitled “Stop Ebola” that is being used a waiting tune by a local phone operator.Bloggers have been able to put key issues onto the public domain, and good examples include highlighting the negligent death of a young model at a hospital in Abidjan earlier this year and keeping people informed about the New Year’s stampede which led to the death of 61 people outside Abidjan Stadium in 2013. Social networks also proved to be a powerful tool during the violence that followed the disputed election in 2010, when more than 3 000 people were killed in five months. A hashtag #CIVsocial was used on Twitter to help coordinate relief efforts and share information.last_img read more

In Other News Florence Left 55M in Damage at Ft Bragg Florida

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Fort Bragg suffered about $55 million in damage from Hurricane Florence, which dumped several feet of rain over parts of eastern North Carolina last month, the post’s garrison commander said Wednesday during the annual Greater Fayetteville Chamber State of the Community. About 600 buildings were damaged, Col. Kyle Reed said. As of Sept. 30, the post had received about $6 mission in assistance, leaving a $48 million hole. “I’m working on that,” he told the audience, reported the Fayetteville Observer. … Enterprise Florida is looking for a firm to advocate for the state’s defense installation and missions before DOD and Congress. The contractor, which will work under the direction of the Florida Defense Support Task Force (FDSTF), will need to implement initiatives designed to enhance and secure the long-term viability, retention and growth of Florida’s defense assets. Responses to the RFP are due Nov. 9. For more information, contact Terry McCaffrey, FDSTF executive director, at tmccaffrey@eflorida.com.Army photo by Jason Whittakerlast_img read more

Bank of Baroda shares plummet 10 on BSE Sensex rebounds to gain

first_imgShares of state-run Bank of Baroda fell more than 10 percent on the BSE on Monday in response to the second-largest Indian lender announcing disappointing quarterly results on Friday after market hours. Stocks of many other PSU banks, such as State Bank of India, Canara Bank, Dena Bank and Syndicate Bank, also ended the day with losses.The Bank of Baroda stock opened at Rs. 150, marginally lower from its Friday close, and embarked on a downhill path to hit an intra-day low of Rs. 139.80, but later trimmed losses to close at Rs. 142.20, down 8.23 percent from its previous close.  The bank’s standalone net loss was Rs. 3,230 crore for the March 2016 quarter as against a net profit of Rs. 598 crore in the corresponding quarter last year. A 227 percent rise in provisioning for bad loans resulted in the bank’s profit taking a hit.On the NSE, the Nifty PSU Bank was the only sectoral index to end with losses.The S&P BSE Sensex opened from its Friday close but rebounded later to close with a gain of 164 points at 25,653. The NSE Nifty gained 46 points to close at 7,860.”A recovery in oil and commodities sparked a late rally in metal makers, private banks and automobile stocks,” AK Prabhakar, head of research at IDBI Capital Capital Market Services Ltd, told the Mint. Both foreign institutional investors (FIIs) and domestic institutional investors (DIIs) were net sellers of equities worth Rs. 79.84 crore and Rs. 127.91 crore, respectively, according to provisional data released by the NSE. Markets ignored The Indian rupee closed at 66.81 to the US dollar, recovering from the opening low of 66.91 to the greenback. “Following weak global cues the rupee opened on a weaker note but rose in the intra-day session after rebound in domestic equities,” IFA Global said in a note. Gold gained Rs. 25 to close at Rs. 30,050 per 10 gm while silver edged higher by Rs. 335 to end at Rs. 41,260 per kg in the Delhi bullion market on Monday.last_img read more

SBI hikes 1year MCLR rate to 815 percent EMIs to get expensive

first_imgSBI hikes 1-year MCLR rate to 8.15 percentReuters fileIndia’s largest lender State Bank of India on Thursday (March 1) increased the one-year marginal cost of funds based lending rate (MCLR) by 20 basis points to 8.15 percent from 7.95 percent across various maturities.Home loan and personal loan borrowers will be affected by the revised rates as it would affect the interest rates on loans. The Increase in MCLR rates by the largest public sector bank in India shows that the EMI (Equated Monthly Installments) will also increase. The new benchmark rate will be effective from March 1, 2018, the bank said through a notification. The hike in MCLR rates comes a day after the bank increased fixed deposit rates of maturities. SBI MCLRSBIThe overnight MCLR rate has been increased from 7.70 percent to 7.80 percent, while the six-month MCLR has been increased from 7.90 percent to 8.00 percent earlier.The two-year MCLR rate has gone up to 8.25 percent from 8.05 percent. Also, the three-year MCLR rate has been raised to 8.35 percent from 8.10 percent.On February 28, SBI has increased the interest rate on various term deposits with immediate effect. For retail domestic deposits below Rs 1 crore, a depositor will now earn 6.40 percent interest rate on one-year deposit, from the 6.25 percent interest rate earlier. Senior citizen for the same amount of deposit and tenure will earn 6.90 percent from 6.75 percent earlier.The proposed rates of interest shall be made applicable to fresh deposits and renewals of maturing deposits, read the SBI statement.MCLR is the benchmark lending rate based on which banks in India lend to borrowers. Till 31 March 2016, banks used the base rate as the benchmark rate to lend.Reuters reports that this is the first hike in the one-year MCLR after the MCLR regime came into effect in April 2016.last_img read more

DU teachers support quota reform but not attack on VC residence

first_imgDU teachers support quota reform, but not attack on VC residenceMembers of Dhaka University Teachers’ Association formed a human chain on the campus on Tuesday, protesting at the attack on Dhaka University vice-chancellor’s official residence.The association held the protest rally at the foot of Aparajeya Bangla of Dhaka University around noon, demanding immediate arrest and punishment of the attackers, reports UNB.However, the teachers of Dhaka University extended their moral support to the demand for quota reform.Dramatist Ramendu Majumdar, who too joined the human chain, said the students’ demand to reform the quota system is logical but the attack on the VC’s house is totally unwanted.The attack was pre-planned, he claimed.The DUTA leaders observed that university students are not behind the attack and the attack was carried out as part of a plot.Sadeka Halim, dean of the Social Sciences faculty, urged the authorities concerned to bring the attackers to book.The association also announced programme to wear black badges from 11am to 11:59am on 12 April suspending their academic activities including classes.The DUTA leaders invited journalists to come to the VC’s residence on Wednesday around 11:00am as they would show the video footage of the attack.The teachers assured the agitating students that they will request the prime minister top bring logical reform in the quota system.However, a section of general students continued their silent protest over the law enforcers’ attack on the agitating students, carrying placards, in front of the DUTA human chain.Different slogans including “Why were attacks in the campus”, “Why were students injured?”, “Teachers (our guardians), we want answer”, were written in the placards.Amid demonstrations in Shahbagh and adjacent areas early Monday seeking reform in the quota system, some unknown attackers entered the VC’s residence breaking its main gate and ransacked several rooms and furniture.The attackers also set fire on two vehicles parked inside the VC’s residence.last_img read more

Abbott Officially Calls Special Session Allowing Lawmakers To Begin Filing Bills

first_imgMarjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas TribuneGov. Greg Abbott lays out items for a special session at a press conference on June 6, 2017.Gov. Greg Abbott issued a declaration for a special session of the Texas Legislature Monday, formally inviting lawmakers back to Austin to pass “sunset legislation” that will keep several key state agencies open.The long-awaited procedural move allows lawmakers to begin filing bills for the special session set to begin on July 18. In addition to the formal declaration, Abbott also released a draft version of 19 additional items he plans to add to the special session agenda later on. Last month, Abbott announced that lawmakers would consider 20 total legislative items during the special session.Lawmakers’ failure to pass “sunset” legislation during this year’s 140-day regular session forced Abbott to call the special session. Absent that measure, government agencies including the Texas Medical Board, which licenses doctors across the state, will have to shut down.“With today’s proclamation, and with bill authors already lined up for all special session items, I look forward to working with the House and Senate to finish the people’s business,” Abbott said in a statement.During the special session, lawmakers will return to several controversial issues that deeply divided the state’s Republican leadership, including a so-called “bathroom bill” that seeks to restrict which bathrooms transgender Texans can use. In his unofficial supplemental call, Abbott described that issue as “legislation regarding the use of multi-occupancy showers, locker rooms, restrooms, and changing rooms.”Abbott also wants legislators to take on school finance reform, school choice for special needs students and several local control measures.Secretary of the Senate Patsy Spaw said her office received a copy of the proclamation around 11:00 a.m., which she forwarded to senators to alert them that they could begin filing bills. A physical copy of the proclamation was also delivered to senators’ offices in the Capitol building. No senate bills have yet been filed for the special session.Meanwhile the House, which has had an e-filing system in place for years, received over two dozen bills before 1:00 p.m.Robert Haney, the House chief clerk, said the first bill filed Monday, House Bill 41 from state Rep. Mike Schofield, R-Katy, was received at 11:42 a.m. The bill aims to change how the state calculates the constitutional spending limit, which restricts how much the budget can grow from one biennium to the next. Sharelast_img read more