Ex-soldier remains on run after escaping from Lusignan Prison

first_imgThe Guyana Defence Force (GDF) and Prison Service have intensified their hunt for John Lambert, who escaped from the Lusignan Prison, East Coast Demerara (ECD), in the wee hours of April 7.The 24-year-old ex-soldier made his escape less than three days after being sentenced to four years’ imprisonment for narcotics possession.Director of the Guyana Prison Service (GPS), Gladwyn Samuels told Guyana Times on Sunday that the ex-soldier is still at large but that the manhunt by law enforcement officials to recapture him continues.“We are not giving up the search for him. As long as he is out there, we will keep looking, the manhunt is still on. It has not been called off,” he stated.Meanwhile, law enforcement officials are asking that if anyone knows the whereabouts or has seen Lambert, to please make contact with the nearest police station or call 911.Two Sundays ago, at about 03:39h, Lambert escaped from the penitentiary by scaling a fence on the south-eastern side of Holding Bay Three at that facility. Since then, the GPS has been collaborating with the Guyana Police Force (GPF) to recapture the prisoner.Upon his escape, acting Director of the Prison, Kevin Pilgrim had stated that during Lambert’s escape, a rank at the Operational Post of the prison spotted the convict and verbally warned him to desist but eventually had to engage the young man in order to prevent him from getting away. However, the rank’s attempts proved futile.“A rank would have engaged him and had to discharge several rounds in that direction which actually raised an initial alarm. There is police on standby right at Lusignan and you also have a Prison Task Force which complements that.When they would have heard the gunshot, they would have obviously responded not knowing exactly what they were responding to, all but they knew was that it was an emergency,” he explained.Guyana Times was further told that upon responding to the alarm that was raised, the teams automatically reverted to the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for such cases.“They managed to have picked up trails of the jersey, the general area that he was in but as you know, he is an ex-military person so he is more prone to have been tactical about his escape. It was not just wild and acted out of impulse, he would have been more precise based on what he is doing because that was exactly the case even for him escaping.It was very precise, he just used his training for not a good purpose today, but he will still make some mistakes too because once you take good training and try to put it to bad use you will make some mistakes”, Pilgrim added.According to the Prison’s records, Lambert was incarcerated on Friday, April 5, 2019, following his appearance at the Leonora Magistrate’s Court, West Coast Demerara (WCD), for the offence of trafficking in cannabis (1456 grams).He was sentenced to pay a fine of $30,000 as well as serve four years’ imprisonment.last_img read more

NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time Laboratory Technician I at Charles River LabsFull-Time Associate Director (Compensation) at Charles River LabsFull-Time Sales Representative (Packaging) at VeritivFull-Time Delivery Driver at American Furniture RentalFull-Time Auto Technician at BridgestoneFull-Time CDL B Driver at LilyFull-Time Marketing Specialist at AltroFull-Time Marketing Specialist at AmetekFull-Time Systems Engineer via Davis CompaniesFull-Time Operations Manager via Michael Page USA(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Pakistan to honour bravery in NZ attack

first_imgImran KhanA Pakistani victim of the Christchurch attack who apparently tried to tackle the gunman before being shot dead will be awarded posthumously in his home country for his courage, prime minister Imran Khan said Sunday.Khan spoke as the Pakistani foreign office confirmed that nine of its citizens had been killed in the mass shootings at two mosques in the New Zealand city which claimed the lives of 50 people Friday, including many who had emigrated from around the world.Video of the massacre shows one man gunned down as he approaches the shooter, while others flee.The man is believed to be Naeem Rashid, although his face is blurred in the footage and he has yet to be formally identified.”Pakistan is proud of Mian Naeem Rashid who was martyred trying to tackle the White Supremacist terrorist & his courage will be recognised with a national award,” Khan tweeted on Sunday.Pakistan has several awards to recognise civilian bravery, and Khan did not specify which one would be awarded to Rashid, whose son also died in the massacre.Rashid’s elder brother Khurshid Alam told AFP in the northwestern Pakistani city of Abbottabad that the award “means a lot” to his family.”I feel very proud,” he said, calling the loss of his brother and nephew a “big, big shock”.Naeem, he said, had visited the family last year, staying for two months.”We had a lovely time. He was a man who would be like a kid with children, and like an adult with grown-ups,” Alam said.- Suspect visited Pakistan -‘Pakistan’s foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi said the award would be given on 23 March, Pakistan Day.He confirmed that nine Pakistani citizens had been killed in the attack while one was in critical condition.One “is still not out of danger but he is being treated”, he told reporters in Islamabad without identifying the victim.Qureshi said families of six of the victims have decided to bury them in Christchurch, while the other three want to bring the remains to Pakistan.”Whatever the families will decide, we will respect it and fulfil their wishes,” he said, adding that flags will be flown at half-mast in Pakistan on Monday in honour of the victims.Officials in Pakistan’s picturesque northern areas also confirmed that the main suspect, 28-year-old white supremacist Brenton Tarrant, had visited the region as a tourist in October, staying for more than a week.Syed Israr Hussain, owner of Osho Thang Hotel in Minapin Nagar, told AFP: “(Tarrant) … stayed for two days before leaving for Khunjerab (Pass, on the border with China).”He was a decent and quiet guy.”He said he remembered Tarrant among the many tourists who visit the region “because he was so impressed by the area, and said he had heard so many negative things about Pakistan but he found it the opposite”.Tarrant’s alleged involvement in the massacre left him “surprised and shocked”, he said.Tarrant is also believed to have visited Gilgit and Skardu in the mountainous north.last_img read more

Gettin Hitched

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. December 1, 2006 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 5 min read I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait for one of our nation’s last great monopolies to be subjected to free market competition. Internet protocol TV is what will finally give cable TV a real race for your money, and 2007 is the year it begins in earnest.I want my FiOS TV or DAVE.TV! I want multiple PCs connected to multiple TVs at Chez Hogan simultaneously playing news and different HBO content on my PCs, as well as PC videos, spread-sheets and e-mail on my TVs. I want to pause, play back or skip ahead in live TV programs. And before business trips, I want to use Google to fetch Gilligan’s Island episodes for my laptop.Unfortunately, this vision hasn’t come into sharp focus yet, and IPTV hasn’t reached my neighborhood. But triple-play IPTV bundles (broadband, voice and video) are available to millions of folks in communities large and small, from Boston to Pottawatomie, Oklahoma, to Beaumont, California. A potentially fruitful aspect of these deployments is a new connection between your PC network and entertainment constellation. For example, subscribe to Verizon’s FiOS triple play, and the tech installs a wireless router connected to a TV set-top box/digital video recorder that’s actually a 160GB server. It can save 120 hours of video and let you view different videos, live programming, or photos from a PC on three separate TVs.That’s just a first wobbly step toward converged PC/entertainment networks, which Parks Associates predicts will be found in 30 million American homes by 2010. Not all will include IPTV. There are thorny digital rights and regulatory issues to work out before IP becomes the lingua franca between PCs and TVs. But we’ve passed some important milestones, including super-fast internet access for a critical mass of consumers; PCs and handhelds with enough graphics and computing power to deliver quality video and audio; and big, high-resolution TV/PC flat panels available at commodity prices.More than 5 million people worldwide already subscribe to IPTV version 1.0, reports iSuppli. That number will triple in 2007. By 2010, there should be 63 million IPTV subscribers worldwide, says iSuppli vice president Mark Kirstein, about 13 million of them in the U.S.That’s not most of the viewing public by any means. But IPTV doesn’t have to supplant cable to dampen subscription rates and up the TV ante. It just has to be a viable alternative.Telecom Tuning InIronically, the main proponents of IPTV are the same telcos who’ve had their own monopolies undermined by cable competitors. AT&T and Verizon are committing billions to a last-mile fiber-optic build-out-in part to defend their best markets against cable phone offerings. But video is also the richest vein in the triple play and a brand-new way for even century-old ruraltelcos to serve less populated areas.”It’s amazing how quickly Verizon picked up 25 percent to 30 percent market share in some communities,” muses Kirstein, considering those customers were wrested from cable. Initially, IPTV providers will break in by highlighting multiscreen viewing, expanded DVR and more interactivity for prices comparable to cable. But eight separate studies have found double-digit cuts in cable rates when IPTV comes to town.The speed of deployment will depend on the outcome of a regulatory tug-o-war being fought in state houses and city councils nationwide. TV isn’t just any old free market where technology will win out. As many as 30,000 separate regulatory bodies have to give their blessing and receive their tribute.Besides expanded functionality, New TV ushers in expanded video on demand. Initially, it will be mostly the same content traditional cable pro-viders offer, says Kirstein. But cable is contractually bound to an Old TV establishment that’s conflicted about its digital rights and how many copies of what should be allowed on what platforms. The growth opportunity is not in the same mass-market content–it’s in channels narrowly focused on a particular sport, hobby, music genre or religion, says Kirstein, or foreign-language channels direct from overseas.The BBQ channel on DAVE.TV might not be your cup of sauce. But, as the MySpace/YouTube phenomenon demonstrates, there are millions of wannabe moviemakers out there. They’ll need hardware, software and services that iSuppli projects will constitute a $4.5 billion TV spinoff by 2010. And like blogs or podcasts, VOD offers a low-budget way for entrepreneurs to reach self-selecting, highly motivated customer sets.Imagine marketing to a very defined audience and supporting them with click-to-call URLs and how-to videos. The hallmarks of New TV will be more choice, more flexibility and much more interactivity between you and your customers.It won’t be your father’s TV.IPTV GuideA sampling of nationwide IPTV services:Akimbo: A $180 player and $10 a month bring an eclectic mix of 10,000 vids to your TV.AT&T U-verse: A wireless router hooked up to a set-top network lets three TVs display or record 80 hours of different traditional channels simultaneously.DAVE.TV: This content-sharing community proves anyone with a camera-phone can make movies.ITVN: A $100 player (free with a 12-month subscription at $10 per month) accesses a half-dozen reasonably priced channel packages.Verizon FiOS TV: Like AT&T U-verse, but you can record 120 hours of video and transfer PC pics and music to your TVs.Mike Hoganis Entrepreneur’s technology editor.last_img read more

Should US Visa Control Tighten Heres How Overseas Tech Firms Might React

first_imgNovember 28, 2016 How Success Happens Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. This story originally appeared on Reuters Anticipating a more protectionist U.S. technology visa program under a Donald Trump administration, India’s $150 billion IT services sector will speed up acquisitions in the United States and recruit more heavily from college campuses there.Indian companies including Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), Infosys and Wipro have long used H1-B skilled worker visas to fly computer engineers to the U.S., their largest overseas market, temporarily to service clients.Staff from those three companies accounted for around 86,000 new H1-B workers in 2005-14. The U.S. currently issues close to that number of H1-B visas each year.  President-elect Trump’s campaign rhetoric, and his pick for Attorney General of Senator Jeff Sessions, a long-time critic of the visa program, have many expecting a tighter regime.”The world over, there’s a lot of protectionism coming in and push back on immigration. Unfortunately, people are confusing immigration with a high-skilled temporary workforce, because we are really a temporary workforce,” said Pravin Rao, chief operating officer at Infosys, India’s second-largest information technology firm.While few expect a complete shutdown of skilled worker visas as Indian engineers are an established part of the fabric of Silicon Valley, and U.S. businesses depend on their cheaper IT and software solutions, any changes are likely to push up costs.And a more restrictive program would likely mean Indian IT firms sending fewer developers and engineers to the United States, and increasing campus recruitment there.”We have to accelerate hiring of locals if they are available, and start recruiting freshers from universities there,” said Infosys’ Rao, noting a shift from the traditional model of recruiting mainly experienced people in the U.S.”Now we have to get into a model where we will recruit freshers, train them and gradually deploy them, and this will increase our costs,” he said, noting Infosys typically recruits 500-700 people each quarter in the U.S. and Europe, around 80 percent of whom are locals.AcquisitionsTrump’s election win and Britain’s referendum vote to leave the European Union are headwinds for India’s IT sector, as clients such as big U.S. and British banks and insurers hold off on spending while the dust settles.In India’s IT hub of Bengaluru and the financial capital Mumbai, executives expect a Trump administration to raise the minimum wage for foreign workers, pressuring already squeezed margins.Buying U.S. companies would help Indian IT firms build their local headcount, increase their on-the-ground presence in key markets and help counter any protectionist regulations.Indian software services companies have invested more than $2 billion in the United States in the past five years. North America accounts for more than half of the sector’s revenue.”We have to accelerate acquisitions,” said Rao at Infosys, which in the past two years has bought companies including U.S.-based Noah Consulting and Kallidus Technologies.Jatin Dalal, Wipro’s chief financial officer, said his growth strategy is to buy companies that offer something beyond what Wipro already does, or new, disruptive firms — such as Appirio, a U.S. cloud services firm.The chief executive of Tech Mahindra, C.P. Gurnani, said his firm, which two years ago bought network services management firm Lightbridge Communications Corp., is on the look-out for more U.S. acquisitions, particularly in healthcare and fintech — financial technology firms that are disrupting traditional banking services.Offshoring and automationIn a broader shift from labor intensive onsite projects, Indian IT firms are also turning to higher-tech services such as automation, cloud computing and artificial intelligence (AI) platforms.With better technology and faster networks, IT firms are encouraging Western clients to adopt more virtual services.Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka says he has focused on automation and AI as growth drivers since 2014. “The AI platform is 5-6 percent of our revenues,” he told Reuters. “Three years ago, it was zero.”More automation would mean fewer onshore developers.”The ‘Plan B’ would be to accelerate the trend … to reduce their reliance on people and increase their focus on delivering automation, leveraging the cloud for their clients,” said Partha Iyengar, Gartner’s head of research in India.(Reporting by Sankalp Phartiyal and Euan Rocha in BENGALURU and MUMBAI, with additional by Arno Schuetze in FRANKFURT; Editing by Ian Geoghegan) 4 min read Listen Nowlast_img read more

Neanderthals may not have been as clever as thought

first_imgAccording to a study by the University of Tübingen and New York University (NYU), Neanderthals​ may not have been as clever as previously supposed. The experimental archaeology project found that a wood tar used by the cousins of Homo sapiens as a glue to construct tools didn’t require as complex a process as once thought, suggesting that Neanderthal tool making isn’t necessarily evidence of a high level of cognitive and cultural development.One of the problems in understanding the past is how much technology has advanced over the millennia while leaving little or no record of how things used to be done. The result is that archaeologists often look at ancient people doing something extremely complicated like smelting metal or baking bread and then throwing up their hands in frustration as to figuring out how they did it.It’s for this reason that experimental archaeology was developed, where researchers look at old folk skills or try to reverse engineer an ancient technology. As a result, many seemingly impossible technological feats became understandable because the processes were simpler or used for a different purpose. AllMedX What diseases can cause xerostomia? Learn which ones on Allmedx.com. We recommend Why is dry mouth worse at night? Learn the answer at Allmedx.com. Is dry mouth a concern for people with AIDS? Check the latest information Allmedx.com. Gel treatment for dry mouth. Learn more at Allmedx.com. Google Analytics settings What are the main ingredients in this spray for dry mout? Learn the answer on Allmedx.com Privacy policy AllMedX Does wearing dentures make dry mouth worse? Visit Allmedx.com to learn how to get relief. For example, experiments in how copper was first smelted started out by throwing chunks of malachite on a campfire and wondering why it wouldn’t melt, to eventually discovering that the first copper had more to do with a happy accident when ancient potters used copper ores to paint their fired pots, only to find beads of metal in their kilns.However, it’s an approach that can also produce some blind alleys. One case in point, according to the Tübingen/NYU team, is that of Neanderthals and wood tar.Making tar out of wood is a very well understood process that was practiced on an industrial scale until relatively recently and is still used today. But it’s a very complex process that requires either vessels made out of metal or ceramics, or the construction of charcoal burners where wood is meticulously stacked, sealed under earth and clay, and then set alight, so the wood turns into charcoal in the absence of oxygen, and tar, pitch, and turpentine distill out.This is one of the reasons why many scientists believe that Neanderthals were very advanced from an intellectual and cultural point of view. Studies of their tools showed that they used wood tar as glue to stick bits of flint to handles of wood or bone, so they must have been pretty hot stuff in the brain department to figure out how to make that tar.But when researchers at the University of Tübingen, NYU’s University’s Department of Anthropology and the Tandon School of Engineering looked at the problem, they found that there was a simple way to get tar out of a raw material like birch bark. Instead of constructing a complex apparatus, the team took fresh or dead birch bark and burned it near flat river stones.They found that after three hours, the stones were covered with a black, sticky mess – wood tar. This was easily scraped from the stones and analysis demonstrated that the tar was molecularly similar to that found on Neanderthal tools. AllMedX Yes No AllMedX I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more AllMedX AllMedX Powered by The team then used the tar to construct a test tool that a robot arm dragged with great precision across a test bed 170 times, yet it showed no signs of the adhesive bond weakening. In addition, they constructed a tool using the tar to attach a stone scraper to a wooden handle, which was then used to scrape the tough outer membrane from the thigh bone of a calf.Because the stone method is so simple and could have been discovered by the Neanderthals so easily at any camp site, the study concluded that the presence of tar-glued tools is not an indicator of complex behavior or organization.The study was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).Source: New York Universitylast_img read more

Why does the C programming language refuse to die

first_imgAs a technology research analyst, I try to keep up the pace with the changing world of technology. It seems like every single day, there is a new programming language, framework, or tool emerging out of nowhere. In order to keep up, I regularly have a peek at the listicles on TIOBE, PyPL, and Stackoverflow along with some twitter handles and popular blogs, which keeps my FOMO (fear of missing out) in check. So here I was, strolling through the TIOBE index, to see if a new programming language is making the rounds or if any old timer language is facing its doomsday in the lower half of the table. The first thing that caught my attention was Python, which interestingly broke into the top 3 for the first time since it was ranked by TIOBE. I never cared to look at Java, since it has been claiming the throne ever since it became popular. But with my pupils dilated, I saw something which I would have never expected, especially with the likes of Python, C#, Swift, and JavaScript around. There it was, the language which everyone seemed to have forgotten about, C, sitting at the second position, like an old tower among the modern skyscrapers in New York. A quick scroll down shocked me even more: C was only recently named the language of 2017 by TIOBE. The reason it won was because of its impressive yearly growth of 1.69% and its consistency – C has been featured in the top 3 list for almost four decades now. This result was in stark contrast to many news sources (including Packt’s own research) that regularly place languages like Python and JavaScript on top of their polls. But surely this was an indicator of something. Why would a language which is almost 50 years old still hold its ground against the ranks of newer programming language? C has a design philosophy for the ages A solution to the challenges of UNIX and Assembly The 70s was a historic decade for computing. Many notable inventions and developments, particularly in the area of networking, programming, and file systems, took place. UNIX was one such revolutionary milestone, but the biggest problem with UNIX was that it was programmed in Assembly language. Assembly was fine for machines, but difficult for humans. Watch now: Learn and Master C Programming For Absolute Beginners So, the team working on UNIX, namely Dennis Ritchie, Ken Thompson, and Brian Kernighan decided to develop a language which could understand data types and supported data structures. They wanted C to be as fast as the Assembly but with the features of a high-level language. And that’s how C came into existence, almost out of necessity. But the principles on which the C programming language was built were not coincidental. It compelled the programmers to write better code and strive for efficiency rather than being productive by providing a lot of abstractions. Let’s discuss some features which makes C a language to behold. Portability leads to true ubiquity When you try to search for the biggest feature of C, almost instantly, you are bombarded with articles on portability. Which makes you wonder what is it about portability that makes C relevant in the modern world of computing. Well, portability can be defined as the measure of how easily software can be transferred from one computer environment or architecture to another. One can also argue that portability is directly proportional to how flexible your software is. Applications or software developed using C are considered to be extremely flexible because you can find a C compiler for almost every possible platform available today. So if you develop your application by simply exercising some discipline to write portable code, you have yourself an application which virtually runs on every major platform. Programmer-driven memory management It is universally accepted that C is a high-performance language. The primary reason for this is that it works very close to the machine, almost like an Assembly language. But very few people realize that versatile features like explicit memory management makes C one of the better-performing languages out there. Memory management allows programmers to scale down a program to run with a small amount of memory. This feature was important in the early days because the computers or terminals as they used to call it, were not as powerful as they are today. But the advent of mobile devices and embedded systems has renewed the interest of programmers in C language because these mobile devices demand that the programmers keep memory requirement to a minimum. Many of the programming languages today provide functionalities like garbage collection that takes care of the memory allocation. But C calls programmers’ bluff by asking them to be very specific. This makes their programs and its memory efficient and inherently fast. Manual memory management makes C one of the most suitable languages for developing other programming languages. This is because even in a garbage collector someone has to take care of memory allocation – that infrastructure is provided by C. Structure is all I got As discussed before, Assembly was difficult to work with, particularly when dealing with large chunks of code. C has a structured approach in its design which allows the programmers to break down the program into multiple blocks of code for execution, often called as procedures or functions. There are, of course, multiple ways in which software development can be approached. Structural programming is one such approach that is effective when you need to break down a problem into its component pieces and then convert it into application code. Although it might not be quite as in vogue as object-oriented programming is today, this approach is well suited to tasks like database scripting or developing small programs with logical sequences to carry out specific set of tasks. As one of the best languages for structural programming, it’s easy to see how C has remained popular, especially in the context of embedded systems and kernel development. Applications that stand the test of time If Beyoncé would have been a programmer, she definitely might have sang “Who runs the world? C developers”. And she would have been right. If you’re using a digital alarm clock, a microwave, or a car with anti-lock brakes, chances are that they have been programmed using C. Though it was never developed specifically for embedded systems, C has become the defacto programming language for embedded developers, systems programmers, and kernel development. C: the backbone of our operating systems We already know that the world famous UNIX system was developed in C, but is it the only popular application that has been developed using C? You’ll be astonished to see the list of applications that follows: The world desktop operating market is dominated by three major operating systems: Windows, MAC, and Linux. The kernel of all these OSes has been developed using the C programming language. Similarly, Android, iOS, and Windows are some of the popular mobile operating systems whose kernels were developed in C. Just like UNIX, the development of Oracle Database began on Assembly and then switched to C. It’s still widely regarded as one of the best database systems in the world. Not only Oracle but MySQL and PostgreSQL have also been developed using C – the list goes on and on. What does the future hold for C? So far we discussed the high points of C programming, it’s design principle and the applications that were developed using it. But the bigger question to ask is, what its future might hold. The answer to this question is tricky, but there are several indicators which show positive signs. IoT is one such domain where the C programming language shines. Whether or not beginner programmers should learn C has been a topic of debate everywhere. The general consensus says that learning C is always a good thing, as it builds up your fundamental knowledge of programming and it looks good on the resume. But IoT provides another reason to learn C, due to the rapid growth in the IoT industry. We already saw the massive number of applications built on C and their codebase is still maintained in it. Switching to a different language means increased cost for the company. Since it is used by numerous enterprises across the globe the demand for C programmers is unlikely to vanish anytime soon. Read Next Rust as a Game Programming Language: Is it any good? Google releases Oboe, a C++ library to build high-performance Android audio apps Will Rust Replace C++?last_img read more