PGGM, ATP join sovereign wealth funds in €3.7bn car-lease deal

first_imgThe €186bn Dutch asset manager PGGM and the €110bn Danish statutory pension fund ATP have bought minority stakes in Dutch car-lease company LeasePlan.They made the investment as part of an international group, which purchased full ownership from Global Mobility Holding – jointly owned by Volkswagen Group and Germany-based Fleet Investments – in a €3.7bn transaction.The consortium included the sovereign wealth funds of Abu Dhabi (ADIA) and Singapore (GIC), as well as institutional investment funds managed by TDR Capital and Goldman Sachs’s Merchant Banking Division.PGGM spokesman Maurice Wilbrink said: “We consider LeasePlan as a very promising company with a solid growth strategy for added value.” PGGM, asset manager for the €166bn healthcare scheme PFZW, cited its participation as “a long-term investment with an attractive risk/return ratio”.It said it would supply one of the consortium’s additional two members on the supervisory board of the car-lease firm, and that the group would share its expertise with the company’s management.Wilbrink declined to provide details about PGGM’s stake or about expected returns.The €19.7bn company, however, reported a net profit of 14% over 2014.On behalf of the consortium, Eric-Jan Vink, head of PGGM’s private equity team, said: “We are investing in the future of a company with an unmatched portfolio of market-leading assets, highly knowledgeable and dedicated staff and a sound strategy under a highly experienced management.”According to LeasePlan, the group intended to finance the acquisition through an equity investment of approximately 50% of the purchase price, a mandatory convertible note of €480m and a cash-pay debt facility of €1.55bn.Founded in 1963, the company has become a global market leader, with operations in 32 countries and total fleet management of 1.4m vehicles.It employs 6,800 staff in total.The deal should be concluded by the end of this year, pending regulatory approval.last_img read more

Edwards brothers embrace sibling connection in pool

first_imgBlake wants to cruise in an RV across Australia. Lachlan thinks the idea is dreadful. Lachlan loves listening to Taylor Swift. Blake thinks she’s awful. The Edwards brothers are two of USC’s top aquatic athletes. But though they share a love for the sport and for each other, they couldn’t be more different.Blake is a 23-year-old junior transfer from Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. Lachlan is a 20-year-old sophomore who was recruited by USC straight out of high school and spent last year playing for the Trojans.The two have spent many years playing water polo together. They grew up by the pool, as their mother and father represented Australia in swimming and water polo, respectively.Blake started playing water polo as a 12 year old, when his older brothers began their careers, and Lachlan started at the same time as an 8-year-old. The two are the third and fifth brothers in a family of aquatic athletes.Five of the brothers started for the same Melbourne Collegians club team in what was a season unlike anything most athletes or siblings could ever hope to experience.“For me, it was one of my most memorable water polo experiences — that camaraderie  that we developed from knowing each other,” Blake said. “It was just a really rewarding experience to be out there and to share something with your brothers.”Both brothers are members of the Australian National Team, so they have been able to travel to many places in Asia and Eastern Europe.  However, one place water polo had never taken the Edwards’ before USC was the United States.Their perception of America was taken straight from Hollywood. Blake confessed he loved watching the TV show The O.C.“My dream is to have a girl on the back of my bike, riding on the boardwalk,” he said.Not only are the two countries’ cultures different, but both brothers also acknowledged that the transition from Australian universities was very challenging because the student body is much more disengaged and the learning more theoretical on their home continent.“I find that the way it’s set up here with everyone on campus sets up more opportunities to network and meet people,” Blake said.  “The learning is much more engaging and enjoyable.”Though the brothers are good at coexisting in the pool, they aren’t so used to being forced to do so outside of it.  Currently, Blake and Lachlan are sharing a room, something they haven’t had to do since before they were five.“We fought a lot more back home. Usually he is the grumpiest man back home, and I’m always annoying him … now that we’re in the same room, he hasn’t really got a choice,” Blake said.  “We’re still in the honeymoon stage.”Even the honeymoon stage of a relationship has its tense points, though.  Blake described a wrong turn he made in L.A. that gave him an eye-opening look at some of the more interesting parts of Los Angeles.  Lachlan shook his head and expressed how happy he was that he missed out on that quasi-adventure.And though the brothers share a room, they do not share a taste in music.“You listen to all crap, like all ’80s stuff,” Lachlan said to Blake. “There’s a time and a place for that, and he cannot pick when that should be played.”Blake responded disapprovingly by telling his brother that he listens to a lot of teenage girl music.“It’s the best stuff,” Lachlan replied.When their time at USC comes to a close and the brothers are back down under, both would like to spend time seeing more of Australia, however Blake’s desired surfing road trip in an RV isn’t for everyone.“That’s where we’re the opposite,” Lachlan said.  “It’d be good to see that stuff, but a year in a truck with him, I don’t know about that.”In the meantime, the brothers said their biggest goal is to win a national championship for USC, something they said their connection might help them to do.“I seem to find him a lot easier,” Blake said. “I don’t know if it’s because of the size of him but that’s the way it’s always happened.  I understand him and his abilities a lot more, and he understands mine as well.”The brothers will continue their water polo career together, both in and out of the pool.  They will look to lead USC to another national title, something they say shouldn’t be too hard.“There’s no one closer than your family, so when I’m successful and able to share it with him, it’s something I can’t describe,” Lachlan said. “Seeing him be successful and play well, you get the same feeling if it was you doing it.”last_img read more

Cloth face masks available to the community

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA,Mich.— When entering a public facility, the local health department is encouraging residents to wear face masks. Joann Fabrics and Crafts Store in Alpena is giving away free masks to residents and local agencies who need them.Cloth face masks are free to the community and pre-assembled. The inside of Joann’s is closed to the public, but masks are available for curbside pick up.Staff is operating from 11am to 6pm Monday through Sunday.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious COVID-19 testing site now available to patientsNext Survey shows one in seven small businesses not confident of surviving the COVID-19 Pandemiclast_img read more

Bonsignore: LA Dodgers’ new season brings hope — and a lot of angst

first_imgOn the Dodgers’ first day back in Los Angeles since getting taken out of the National League Division Series by the New York Mets last year, Clayton Kershaw glanced around the clubhouse, smiled and said: “There’s a lot of new faces. That’s always exciting.”That’s one way of looking at it.Another is: Who in the name of Branch Rickey are these guys, and what are they doing in the Dodgers’ clubhouse so close to Opening Day?Dave Roberts is the new manager, and he brought eight new coaches with him. Only pitching coach Rick Honeycutt survived the transition from Don Mattingly to Roberts. The 25-man roster that opens the season Monday in San Diego could have as many as 10 new faces compared with the one that opened last season.Not one of the newcomers represents the kind of impact free agent or trade acquisition the Dodgers needed to smooth out their flaws and potentially lift them to serious World Series contention. Hell, even the Dodger Stadium organist is new.The question is, is he better than Nancy Bea, whom he replaced?And are these Dodgers better than the 2015 version? I don’t see how anyone can answer yes to that question with a straight face.Not when the Dodgers inexplicably allowed Zack Greinke to leave as a free agent — to division rival Arizona no less.Or when they didn’t make one offseason addition you can definitively say makes them better than when they ended last season.It’s hard to get excited about Opening Day knowing all that.And it’s impossible not to be frustrated knowing it didn’t have to be like this.Andrew Friedman was hired away from the Tampa Bay Rays two years ago to run baseball operations, hailed as a baseball savant uniquely qualified to push the Dodgers over the hump. He’s done anything but. In fact, the team has fallen a step or two back thanks to some head-scratching trades — you think Dee Gordon wouldn’t look good at second base right about now? — and ambivalence to making a bold, big move.If it’s part of some grand plan in which the Dodgers grit their teeth through one or two bridge seasons on their way to championship parades, great.But it’s hard to even see the bridge right now, let alone across it, to be certain this is all headed to a good place.“I know those guys, they’re going to do their research. And the risks they take, they’re going to be calculated and smart,” Dodgers reliever J.P. Howell said. “I know they’re going to pull some moves that look random, but trust me, it’s not random. They know what they’re doing.”We can only hope Howell is right.For now, all we can do is brace for one of the most uncertain Dodgers seasons in years. Outside of Kershaw, the pitching staff is completely revamped.Greinke, who played Robin to Kershaw’s Batman the past three years as the most lethal one-two pitching punch in baseball, is gone.Journeyman Scott Kazmir replaces him as the No. 2 starter, which represents a major step back. Beyond that is utter uncertainty with newcomer Kenta Maeda and Alex Wood the No. 3 and 4 starters. The No. 5 is anyone’s guess at the moment.The everyday lineup is every bit as curious, thanks in large part to a crushing array of injuries that crippled the Dodgers during spring training. Plus, it appears ownership changed the locks on the vault storing all that surplus money, which resulted in an entire winter passing without one major free-agent signing or trade.Howie Kendrick and Andre Ethier will start the season on the disabled list, joining pitchers Hyun-Jin Ryu, Brandon McCarthy, Brett Anderson and Mike Bolsinger.A bunch of others were besieged by various ailments: Corey Seager, Justin Turner, Adrian Gonzalez, Yasiel Puig, Alex Guerrero, Kiké Hernandez, Yasmani Grandal and Kazmir the most prominent. Gonzalez should be fine, and his consistency and dependability will anchor the offense.But it’s all just hope and a prayer surrounding him. Like Turner replicating his breakthrough 2015 season and elite prospect Seager performing like a 26-year-old veteran rather than what he is — a 21-year-old rookie.Or Kendrick returning soon from the disabled list to give the Dodgers certainty at second base. Anyone else think Puig will emerge as a disciplined, mature, consistent veteran this year after two maddeningly inconsistent, immature seasons that sent him plunging from one of the game’s brightest young stars to one of its biggest enigmas?And Joc Pederson will re-emerge as the force he was over the first half of last season, rather than the kid whose head was spinning for most of the second half? That’s way too much hope and prayer for my taste.Especially for a club with an estimated $229 million payroll.Baseball season is upon us.But all things considered, it’s hard to get excited about the Dodgers.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Saints’ Sean Payton rips trend of hiring young head coaches

first_imgSaints coach Sean Payton believes NFL teams that target young, offensive-minded coaches are making a mistake by ruling out other qualified candidates without giving them a chance to prove themselves.During an interview with NFL Network, Payton explained this year’s hiring process left out worthy candidates simply because teams were searching for the “next Sean McVay.” Based on the eight teams that hired new head coaches this season, there’s a notable trend as six of those coaches led the offense. I asked @Saints Coach Sean Payton about the trend of teams hiring young, offensive-minded head coaches. He delivered a strong, honest response, capped by him saying some teams are making mistakes and the Saints can’t wait to play them. This is damn good. 🔥🔥🔥@nflnetwork pic.twitter.com/AOiAsLCXeO— Steve Wyche (@wyche89) March 28, 2019Payton pointed to Patriots coach Bill Belichick and Tony Dungy as examples that came from the defensive side before seeing success as head coach. NFL Network notes only two of those six hires (Buccaneers’ Bruce Arians and Jets’ Adam Gase) have had previous head coaching experience. Denver’s Vic Fangio and Miami’s Brian Flores were the only two hired during the latest coaching cycle from the defensive side, with Flores being the only non-white male.”I think we’ve got a diversity problem, like this season, what took place, that’s hitting us square in the face. I think that not a lot was written or discussed about it,” Payton explained. “There are a handful of coaches that I know that if I was a GM who I would be interested in hiring.” Related News Greg Schiano abruptly steps down as Patriots defensive coordinator “The thing that can be disappointing though is when you talk to someone and they give you the profile (of their desired new coach) and then I’ll say ‘well you’re not interested in a young Bill Belichick or a young Tony Dungy?'” Payton said.”They get so pigeonholed into — cause this is cyclical, right, this goes — and ultimately you would say if we did a little history, successful head coaches probably come from the east and the west and north and south. They probably come of both color and they probably come on defense and on offense. And they’re good leaders. They’re great leaders. And, so, if you say ‘well I just want the one that coaches quarterbacks and they’re on offense,’ well, then, you’re going to end up with a smaller pool and you’ll probably have less of a chance to be right, because already of eight hired there’s going to be three that survive three years.”Payton, 55, added he’s excited to play those teams that hired a new head coach because he “see(s) a lot of mistakes made in that process.”last_img read more

Ed Elsass, 50, Wellington: June 25, 1963 – June 2, 2014

first_imgEd Elsass, of Wellington, died on Monday, June 2, 2014 at his home in Wellington at the age of 50.Ed ElsassEd was born the son of Stew and Nancee (McGee) Elsass on Tuesday, June 25, 1963 in Wichita. His mother preceded him in death.On Friday, August 30, 1985, Ed and Carol (Lawless) were united in marriage in Mulvane. Together they celebrated 28 years of marriage.Ed was a corrections officer for the Sumner County Detention Center in Wellington. Survivors include his wife, Carol Elsass of Wellington; daughter, Shanonn Sharpe and her husband Tyler of Yukon, Oklahoma; son, Benjaminn Elsass and his wife Jeanette of Wellington; father and stepmother, Stew and Marilyn Elsass of Springfield, Missouri; sister, Susann Elsass of Florence, Alabama; stepsisters, Cathy DiFilippo and her husband Tony of Nixa, Missouri and Sarah Truitt of Springfield, Missouri.Memorial services for Ed will be held at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, June 7, 2014 at the Church of Christ in Wellington.Memorials have been established in his loving memory to the Ed Elsass Memorial Fund, American Heart Association and the American Cancer Society. Contributions may be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

South Africa’s commercial radio stations

first_imgA guide to South Africa’s commercial radio stations, which includes what each offers, what frequency to tune into and where the broadcasting areas are.South Africa’s commercial radio stations include Metro FM, Jacaranda FM and Kaya FM. (Image: Jacaranda FM, Facebook)Brand South Africa reporterUnder apartheid, South Africa had only two independent radio stations. With the deregulation of broadcasting in the late 1990s, the number of commercial stations operating outside of state control proliferated.In 1996 six lucrative SABC stations were privatised: Gauteng’s 947 and Radio Jacaranda, KwaZulu-Natal’s East Coast Radio, the Western Cape’s KFM 94.5, the Eastern Cape’s Radio Algoa and the Free State’s OFM. The government raised over R500-million as the stations were licensed to various black-controlled groups.In early 1997 eight new commercial radio licences were granted for broadcasting in South Africa’s three biggest cities – Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban.Applicants targeting black audiences with new formats were generally favoured, with two “smooth jazz” licences, Heart 104.9 in Cape Town and Igagasi 99.5 in Durban; one urban youth station, YFM; and one urban contemporary station, Kaya FM. The remaining four licences went to an English-language talk station, CapeTalk 567; two Afrikaans talk stations, Punt in Cape Town and Durban; and a classical music station, Classic FM.Metro FMBroadcast in English, Metro FM is the largest national commercial station in South Africa, targeting 25- to 34-year-old black urban adults – who its owner the SABC describes as “trendy, innovative, progressive and aspirational”. While the station does have some information and educational aspects, the focus is firmly on contemporary international music – hip-hop, R&B, kwaito and more.Frequency: 96.4 FMMetro FM websiteBroadcast area: Metropolitan areas of Gauteng, Limpopo, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape, Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 5.26-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioJacaranda FMOne of the largest independent commercial stations and also broadcasting in Gauteng, Jacaranda offers a mix of more easy-listening adult contemporary music and news.Frequency: 94.2 FMJacaranda FM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 2.32-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioEast Coast RadioEast Coast broadcasts a mix of music and news to Durban and throughout KwaZulu-Natal.Frequency: 94 to 95 FMEast Coast radio websiteBroadcast area: KwaZulu-NatalAudience (past seven days): 2.06-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioYfmHome of Kwaito and the “Y Generation”, Y is the country’s most popular youth station. Yfm has a self-imposed 50% local music quota – more than any other radio station in the country. It works in partnership with New York-based Masters At Work, who have released SA artists into the US and Europe as part of YFM’s ongoing commitment to South African music and culture.Frequency: 99.2 FMYFM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 1.34-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audio5FMThe SABC’s trendy youth-oriented station, 5FM’s emphasis is on the latest music, movies and South African youth trends. Broadcasting in English to South Africa’s metropolitan areas, its music styles are international, and include a strong component of South African artists of world standard.Frequency: see the 5FM frequency finder5FM websiteBroadcast area: Metropolitan areas of Gauteng, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 1.32-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audio947 (previously known as 94.7 Highveld Stereo)Popular home of Anele’s Breakfast Club, 947 broadcasts a mix of contemporary music that connects with Joburg. It is owned by Primedia Broadcasting.Frequency: 94.7 FM947 websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 1.18-millionLanguage: EnglishOwned by: PrimediaKaya FMKaya FM provides an African-focused adult contemporary and jazz format, with a mix of music and talk. One of the country’s newest radio stations, Kaya broadcasts throughout Gauteng.Frequency: 95.9 FMKaya FM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 932 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioGood Hope FMCape Town’s largest radio station, the SABC’s Good Hope FM plays contemporary music ranging from R&B, ballads and pop through to hip hop, dance, jazz and old school. With a broadcast footprint covering metropolitan Cape Town, Langebaan, Malmesbury, Wellington, Paarl, Franchhoek, Stellenbosch and Gordon’s Bay, it targets the 22- to 32-year-old age group.Frequency: 93.9 to 96.7 FMGood Hope FM websiteBroadcast area: Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 620 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioAlgoa FMAlgoa FM’s music and news is broadcast to the entire Eastern Cape region.Frequency: 94 to 96.7 FMAlgoa FM websiteBroadcast area: Eastern CapeAudience (past seven days): 448 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audio702702 is Gauteng’s number-one current affairs and information station, offering news, sport, business and actuality programming – and lots of phone-in debate. Established in 1980, it was initially a youth music station, moving to the more adult talk format in 1988. During the apartheid era it was one of the only independent sources of broadcast news. The station is owned by Primedia.Frequency: 92.7 FM702 websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 281 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioCapeTalk 567Broadcasting on Medium Wave 567, CapeTalk is Cape Town’s first talk radio station. CapeTalk promises to bring you all the news, views, sport, weather, traffic and information you need. It is owned by Primedia.Frequency: 567 AM (MW)CapeTalk 567 websiteBroadcast area: Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 82 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioClassic FMBased on the UK station, Classic FM has been broadcasting classical music throughout Gauteng since September 1997. Through their partnership with Business Day, the station offers in-depth business coverage each week night from 6pm. There are also lifestyle features, news, financial updates, sport, and interviews with local artists and composers.Frequency: 102.7 FMClassic FM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 151 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioKfm 94.5With the tagline “The most music. Feel Great”, Kfm 94.5 broadcasts adult contemporary music in the Western Cape and as far afield as Alexander Bay and the Northern Cape. It is owned by Primedia.Frequency: 94.5 FMKfm 94.5 websiteBroadcast area: Western Cape, Northern CapeAudience (past seven days): 1.29-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioOFMThe commercial regional station of the Free State (a province with the name Orange Free State before 1994, hence the O), OFM broadcasts adult contemporary music.Frequency: 94 to 97 FMOFM websiteBroadcast area: Free StateAudience (past seven days): 436 000Language: English and AfrikaansOffers live internet audioRadio 2000To the listener, Radio 2000 is a laid back and non-intrusive radio station. Radio 2000, being a facility station, relies heavily on sports broadcasts. The result is that its listenership fluctuates, since it is often based on national and international sports events.Frequency: 97.2 to 100.2 FMRadio 2000 websiteBroadcast area: All provinces, except the Northern CapeAudience (past seven days): 151 000Language: EnglishChannel AfricaThe international radio service of the SABC offers a multilingual source of information on Africa – with news, music and sports. Broadcasts are in Chinyanja, Silozi, Kiswahili, English, French and Portuguese, with shortwave broadcasts covering south, east, central and west Africa, satellite broadcasts covering the sub-Saharan region – and internet broadcasts covering the entire world.Frequency: see the Channel Africa frequency guideChannel Africa websiteBroadcast area: south, east, central and west Africa (shortwave)Language: English, Chinyanja, Silozi, Kiswahili, French and PortugueseOffers live internet audioUseful linksAnt RadioBroadcasting Complaints Commission of South AfricaDepartment of CommunicationsFreedom of Expression InstituteInstitute for the Advancement of JournalismWits JournalismMedia Development and Diversity AgencyMedia Institute of Southern AfricaNational Association of BroadcastersNational Community Radio ForumPrimediaSouth African Audience Research FoundationSouth African Broadcasting CorporationSouth African National Editors ForumWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more