Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November

first_imgAttorney and Rep. Lois Frankel, D-West Palm Beach, faces Republican Cheryl A. Carpenter in November. Neither had a primary. October 1, 2000 Regular News Boca Raton attorney Steve Meyer was unsuccessful in a three-way Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Rep. William “Bill” Andrews, R-Delray Beach. Ocala attorney Judy Johnson won her two-way Democratic primary and is running against Republican Dennis K. Baxley on the general election ballot. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Stacy Ritter, D-Tamarac, faces Republican Joseph “Joe” Kaufman in November. Neither had a primary. Tallahasee attorney Joyce Dove and Cross City attorney Joseph Lander failed to make the runoff in a seven-member Democratic primary in a rural north-central Florida district. Attorney and Sen. Tom Rossin, D-West Palm Beach, faces Republican David Vaughan and a Reform Party candidate on the November ballot. Two other Bar members, Kevin Cannon of Orlando, and Rep. Luis E. Rojas, R-Miami, were unsuccessful in Republican primaries for two other seats. On the House side, lawyers are in five runoff primary races. In a Leon County district, attorney Lorranne Ausley faces Dr. Todd Patterson in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing a Republican nonlawyer in November. In a Lee County based district, attorney Jeff Kottcamp faces Marilyn Stout in the Republican runoff, with the winner facing a write-in candidate in November. Clearwater attorney John Carrasas is in the Republican runoff with Dave Miller, and the victor gaining the seat since only Republicans filed in that race. Boca Raton attorney Barry Silver faces Anne M. Gannon in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing write-in and minor party candidates in November. Boca Raton attorney and Rep. Curt Levine faces Irving Slosberg in the Democratic runoff, with the winner facing a write-in candidate. In other primary races: Port Charlotte attorney Jerry Paul won a three-way Republican primary and faces a write-in candidate in November. Attorney and Democrat Kathy Castor was unopposed in the primary and faces Rep. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, winner of the Republican primary for a Tampa area seat. Tampa attorney and Democrat Betsy McCoy Benedict faces incumbent Rep. Sandra L. Murman, R-Tampa. Neither had a primary. Lakeland attorney and Republican Dennis A. Ross faces Democrat Coy W. Castleberry in November. Neither had a primary. Miami attorney Hector Rivera lost a three-way Republican primary that sent Rafeal Arza to Tallahassee, as no other candidates filed. Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November Both the Florida House and Senate will see some new legal faces among their members following fall elections, but whether the small number of lawyer-legislators increases in the 2000-02 term won’t be known until after November. A handful of lawyers, mostly incumbents but including some newcomers, have already won election as state representatives and senators. Others still face challenges in the October 3 primary runoff or the November 7 general elections. Among the new faces, Tampa attorney Arthenia L. Joyner, a long-time civic activist and former president of the National Bar Association, won her Democratic primary race and a House seat because no Republican or other candidate filed. Republican attorney Mark Mahon of Jacksonville defeated fellow attorney Charles McBurney in the primary to win a seat where no other candidates filed. Also in Jacksonville, Terry L. Fields defeated Jacksonville attorney A. Wellington Barlow in the Democratic primary to win a seat where no other candidate filed. In primary results, attorney and incumbent Rep. Gaston Cantens, R-Sweetwater, was reelected after defeating Robert J. Diaz in the Republican primary. Six incumbent attorneys in the House were returned without any opposition. They are former Bar Board of Governors member J. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, Christopher L. Smith, D-Ft. Lauderdale, Tim Ryan, D-Dania Beach, Kenneth Gottlieb, D-Miramar, Sally Heymann, D-North Miami Beach, and Marco Rubio, R-Miami. On the Senate side, veteran Rep. J. Alex Villalobos, R-Miami, will move to the other side of the Capitol rotunda as he filed unopposed for a Senate seat. Four other lawyer-senators filed for reelection and wound up unopposed. They are: John Laurent, R-Bartow, Burt Saunders, R-Naples, Steven A. Geller, D-Hallandale Beach, and former Bar Board of Governors member Walter G. “Skip” Campbell, D-Ft. Lauderdale. No lawyers won outright in the September primary in other Senate races, and lawyers remaining in those contests have opposition for the November election. No lawyers are involved in any primary runoff Senate campaigns. In those other upper chamber races: Miami attorney Tom David was unopposed in the Republican primary and faces Democrat Cindy Lerner in November. Spring Hill attorney Sabato DeVito was unsuccessful in a three-way Republican primary. Attorneys Edward Skinner Jones of Neptune Beach and Jeff Sneed of Atlantic Beach failed to make the Republican runoff in a four-way primary. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Carlos Lacasa, R-Miami, won a three-way Republican primary and faces a write-in candidate in November. Eighth Circuit State Attorney Rod Smith, a Democrat, won his primary for a Gainesville area seat and faces Republican Rep. Bob Casey in November. center_img Orlando attorney James Auffant had no Democratic primary opposition and faces Republican Jim Kallinger in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Gus Michael Bilirakis, R-Palm Harbor, had no primary and faces only write-in and independent candidates in November. Miami Beach attorney Dan Gelber won a three-way Democratic primary and is being challenged by an independent candidate in November. Winter Park attorney Stuart Buchanan did not have an opponent in his Democratic primary and will face the winner of a GOP runoff. Attorney and House Speaker-Designate Tom Feeney, R-Orlando, faces Democrat Glenda Conley in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Johnie Byrd, Jr., R-Plant City, faces Democrat John Wayne Clark in November. Neither had a primary. Ft. Lauderdale attorney and Democrat John P. “Jack” Seiler faces Republican Stephen M. Greep, Jr., in November. Neither had a primary. Some new lawyers will take legislative seats in November Orlando attorney David Simmons won his two-way Republican primary and faces Democrat Ali Shahnami in November. Attorney and Democrat John Gillespie won the Democratic primary and the right to face Rep. Debby P. Sanderson, R-Ft. Lauderdale, for a Broward County seat. Bonifay attorney Roy Lake was unopposed in the Democratic primary and is running in the general election against Donald Brown, winner of the Republican primary. Palatka attorney Joe H. Pickens won a two-way Republican primary and faces Democrat Skeet Alford in November. Attorney and incumbent Rep. Larry Crow, R-Dunedin, had no primary and faces Democrat Sue Humphreys in November. Gainesville attorney Howard Rosenblatt was unsuccessful in a three-way Democratic primary. Democrat and Orlando attorney Ali Kirk Mashayekhi did not have a primary and faces incument Rep. Randy Johnson, R-Winter Garden, in November. Stuart attorney Joe Negron and incumbent Rep. Art Argenio defeated one other candidate to make the October 3 runoff. The winner faces a write-in candidate in November. All together, 48 attorneys filed to run in 44 House seats, and 11 attorneys filed to run in 11 different Senate races. (All 120 House seats are up for election and half of the 40 Senate seats.) After the first primary, 10 attorneys have been elected to the House, either because they were unopposed or had only primary opposition. Another five have been elected to the Senate for the same reasons. Four attorneys are still in the running for Senate seats, as are 25 attorneys for House seats. (Six attorney-senators are in the middle of their terms.) For the 1998-2000 session, there were 27 lawyers in the House and 13 in the Senate.last_img read more

Ebola Fear Grips Lawmakers

first_imgThe fear of the deadly Ebola virus has forced the House of Representatives to suspend its Extra Ordinary Sitting for Tuesday, September 16, 2014.According to a statement issued from the House’s Press Bureau, leadership of the House took the decision based “on medical advice.” “The House Chambers and surrounding offices are expected to be disinfected due to a probable case of Ebola,” the statement said.“Members and chamber staff have been asked to stay away for 48 hours after the fumigation.  “The Chief Clerk of the House, Madam Mildred Siryon, has been instructed to communicate the House’s decision to the Liberian Senate. The House took the decision after one of the Chamber’s doorkeepers, Captain James Morlu suddenly died.According the House Press Director Isaac Redd, the late Capt. Morlu was briefly ill, but medical authorities are yet establish the cause of death. Based on the probability of Ebola related, the House decided to suspend regular sitting until the House’s wing of the Capitol Building is fully disinfected.Morlu was an active member of the security system in the handling of the Chamber, meaning that during session; he interacted with lawmakers and other staffers regularly and his death raises more concerns about safety in the building. Said information has since created fear among lawmakers vowing for an immediate investigation into Morlu’s death in order to help save the lives of many people who are moving in and out of the legislative seat.Meanwhile, the House renews it mandate for essential staff to show up for work. “Restrictions remain enforced for visitors and those who have absolutely no reason(s) to visit the Capitol Building,” Redd said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more