Inzamam steps down as Pakistan’s chief selector

first_img(REUTERS) – Inzamam-ul-Haq yesterday announced his decision to step down as Pakistan’s chief selector when his contract expires on July 31.Former Pakistan captain Inzamam, who was appointed to the role in April 2016, oversaw a period which included Pakistan’s victory in the Champions Trophy two years ago.Inzamam’s final assignment was to select the Pakistan squad for the World Cup, where the Sarfaraz Ahmed-led team finished fifth in the group stage and failed to qualify for the semi-finals.“After more than three years as chair of the Pakistan men’s selection committee, I have decided not to seek a renewal of my contract,” the 49-year-old Inzamam said in a statement.“With the ICC World Test Championship, due to get underway in September, the ICC T20 World Cup in 2020 and the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2023, I believe it is the right time for the Pakistan Cricket Board to appoint a new chief selector who can bring new ideas and fresh thinking.”During Inzamam’s tenure, players such as Fakhar Zaman, Hasan Ali, Imam-ul-Haq, Mohammad Abbas, Shadab Khan, Shaheen Afridi and Usman Shinwari made their international debuts, while Babar Azam established himself as Pakistan’s batting mainstay across all three formats of the game.“It has been a pleasure to see these players grow and make names for themselves in international cricket,” Inzamam added.“I will follow their progress with interest because I firmly believe these players have all the ingredients to take Pakistan cricket team to greater heights.”last_img read more

Dan Monteroso thrives at 2 sports at Western Liberty after transfer from Purdue

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 1, 2017 at 12:42 am Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3 In the West Liberty men’s basketball season opener Nov. 11, starting guard Dan Monteroso scored 11 points on 5-of-6 shooting. The next day, he ran pass routes and punted for WLU’s football team, hauling in eight passes for 145 yards and two touchdowns. That night, Monteroso stared again on the hardwood and scored 16 points.Three games, two days, two sports.“It was a tough weekend,” Monteroso said, “But I’m happy I did it. It’s something I can say, tell my kids when I’m older.”Monteroso used to be a wide receiver and special teams player at Purdue. But after getting limited playing time — he caught only three passes across his three seasons there and hardly played on special teams — he transferred. Last spring, Monteroso completed 21 credits to graduate from Purdue in three years and take his eligibility elsewhere.Monteroso grew up in Saint Clairsville, Ohio, a short drive from Wheeling, West Virginia, the home of West Liberty University.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBoth of Monteroso’s parents work at West Liberty. His father, Jeff Monteroso, is the defensive coordinator for the football team, and his mother, Cathy Monteroso, teaches in WLU’s College of Education.Throughout his youth and into high school, Monteroso attended basketball camps and played high school games hosted by West Liberty. After receiving only one scholarship offer coming out of high school, Monteroso left the sport for football. After leaving Purdue, Monteroso hoped to revitalize his basketball career, but he couldn’t garner any interest because he hadn’t played organized basketball in three years.The only coach who wanted him was the head coach at West Liberty, Jim Crutchfield, who had seen Monteroso develop. West Liberty gave him a familiar setting to turn back the clock and be a basketball player again.“(When he went to Purdue) I kind of thought he’s got some basketball ability,” Crutchfield said. “I thought it’d be a shame if he never played basketball again.”Jeff Monteroso said last summer was solely filled with basketball workouts for Monteroso. The plan, Jeff said, was for Monteroso to play only basketball at West Liberty. About a week before football preseason-camp began, he changed his tune.Courtesy of West Liberty AthleticsWhen the two sat with WLU head football coach, Roger Waialae, the coach jumped at the opportunity to add a player with the experience and ability of Monteroso. He put up big numbers, catching 14 touchdowns, and used his experience to take less-experienced players under his wing.“He was helping some of the younger kids,” Jeff Monteroso said. “They would listen to him. He would give them advice.”West Liberty’s basketball team is glad to have him, too. The Hilltoppers are 19-1 and Monteroso averages a team-high 18.3 points per game. West Liberty ranks No. 3 in NCAA Division II.Based upon NCAA eligibility rules, Monteroso’s football career concluded this fall. His time as a basketball player will continue for one more season beyond this one.Monteroso has pursued his master’s degree with a focus on coaching education — he’s always wanted to be a college football coach — while playing two sports near his hometown.“It was nice to kind of come back home,” Monteroso said. “It kind of was just a perfect fit.” Commentslast_img read more