Team Sky’s Nicolas Roche wins the 18th stage of the Vuelta a Espana

first_img Press Association Team Sky’s Nicolas Roche claimed victory on the 18th stage of the Vuelta a Espana as T om Dumoulin kept hold of the leader’s red jersey for Team Giant-Alpecin. There was no change at the top of the general classification as Holland’s Dumoulin – Wednesday’s winner – maintained his hold at the summit after coming home 15th in Riaza. He has a three-seconds lead over Astana’s Fabio Aru. With no summit finishes remaining until Sunday’s concluding stage to Madrid, it remains to be seen if Aru of Italy can wrestle the red jersey from Dumoulin. A fascinating conclusion to the race is in prospect as Dumoulin seeks a momentous moment for Dutch cycling. It is 35 years since a Dutchman won a Grand Tour, when Joop Zoetemelk won the 1980 Tour de France. He also won the 1979 Vuelta. Roche was delighted hopes of a stage victory “finally worked out” as he sealed the triumph in Riaza. He told Eurosport: “There was a rider 20 seconds behind and when we saw that I just said ‘let’s just ride to the finish and we’ll do a mano a mano sprint’. It was actually really good and we co-operated well since the 15km to go sign. I think that was our only chance. “Coming into the sprint I wanted to lead it out. Haimar is someone who has got a lot of experience and I’ve lost a few sprints against him in the past, in (Clasica) San Sebastian for example. “I didn’t want to have a slow-start sprint, I wanted to have a really high speed one. “I thought I’d try and manage my own pace. I smiled because I was happy that it worked. I thought ‘yes, for once I didn’t mess up’. “I’ve had a few second and third places and I’ve always lacked that little small bit at the finish. Today it finally worked out.” center_img The 31-year-old Irishman, who last won a Grant Tour stage win during the 2013 race in Spain, won Thursday’s 204-kilometre route from Roa to Riaza in a sprint finish to hand Team Sky their first victory of the Tour. Roche and Haimar Zubeldia ( Trek Factory Racing ) broke away from the leading group with the former just edging out the Basque in a time of five hours, three minutes and 59 seconds as Portugal’s Jose Goncalves (Caja Rural – Seguros RGA) crossed the line 18 seconds further back in third. last_img read more

Freshman Halis brings excitement to young Orange

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 4, 2013 at 12:13 am Contact Josh: jmhyber@syr.edu Take even a slight glance at the Syracuse roster and one thing is immediately noticeable: no seniors. Instead, SU has relied on, and will rely on, a bevy of underclassmen in its first year in the tough Atlantic Coast Conference.Four freshmen have started in each of No. 17 Syracuse’s (2-0-0) two games this season, including Alex Halis, a shifty forward from Brampton, Ontario. The freshman has not only made an impression by scoring goals and dishing out assists, but he’s also brought excitement with an array of nifty moves and creative touches.“He’s a quality player,” SU head coach Ian McIntyre said. “He’s an exciting player. He’s a player that can make things happen and he can get people off their seats.”During Monday night’s home opener against Hartwick, Halis promptly introduced himself to the Colvin Street Elite, the group of student fans that sits near the net on East Colvin Street. The forward sped by defenders, put on the breaks and scanned the field. He also mixed in a few backward heel passes.Halis even made Hartwick senior midfielder Tim Crawford fall. The freshman Halis had possession just feet from the near sideline. His head and eyes went left, and so did Crawford. Halis’ body and the ball went right. The crowd “oohed” and “aahed.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAs Halis goes, McIntyre said, so does Syracuse.“That’s a good feeling,” Halis said. “It gives you confidence. But to me I feel like if everyone plays good, then it’s better for us. I don’t think it should be one player.”In both of SU’s games, Halis played a role in the team’s first goal. In SU’s season opener against Colgate – Halis’ collegiate debut – he headed in a ball from Jordan Murrell to give the Orange a 1-0 lead. Against Hartwick, Halis picked up an assist on Grant Chong’s goal early in the second half.McIntyre called Halis “cutting edge,” comparing him to Nick Perea, Stefanos Stamoulacatos and Emil Ekblom. McIntyre recruits the best players he can, but also the ones that fit his possession style that focuses on precision passing, ball control and creativity.Halis fits the mold. At 5 feet 9 inches tall, Halis can use his size to elude bigger defenders and his speed to get around them.In Canada, Halis led the St. Edmund Campion Bears to two straight OFSAA championships and an undefeated 33-0-1 season in 2012. He is also a member of the Canadian Youth National Program and represented Canada at the 2011 U-17 World Cup.“We’ve been playing together since we were just little kids,” said SU forward Chris Nanco, who played with Halis with St. Edmund Campion and FC Sigma. “We’ve always been together. We’ve created a bond since a young age and it’s a good thing to continue our careers together.”The connection between the two starters is one reason why the Orange has collected favorable results so far this season.In order to keep his personal success rolling, Halis said he has to stay positive and work hard.“He has that little bit of something different,” McIntyre said. “And it won’t always come off. That’s the nature of when you express yourself and when you try some things. But when it does come off, he’s an exciting player to watch.” Commentslast_img read more

Dan Monteroso thrives at 2 sports at Western Liberty after transfer from Purdue

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 1, 2017 at 12:42 am Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3 In the West Liberty men’s basketball season opener Nov. 11, starting guard Dan Monteroso scored 11 points on 5-of-6 shooting. The next day, he ran pass routes and punted for WLU’s football team, hauling in eight passes for 145 yards and two touchdowns. That night, Monteroso stared again on the hardwood and scored 16 points.Three games, two days, two sports.“It was a tough weekend,” Monteroso said, “But I’m happy I did it. It’s something I can say, tell my kids when I’m older.”Monteroso used to be a wide receiver and special teams player at Purdue. But after getting limited playing time — he caught only three passes across his three seasons there and hardly played on special teams — he transferred. Last spring, Monteroso completed 21 credits to graduate from Purdue in three years and take his eligibility elsewhere.Monteroso grew up in Saint Clairsville, Ohio, a short drive from Wheeling, West Virginia, the home of West Liberty University.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBoth of Monteroso’s parents work at West Liberty. His father, Jeff Monteroso, is the defensive coordinator for the football team, and his mother, Cathy Monteroso, teaches in WLU’s College of Education.Throughout his youth and into high school, Monteroso attended basketball camps and played high school games hosted by West Liberty. After receiving only one scholarship offer coming out of high school, Monteroso left the sport for football. After leaving Purdue, Monteroso hoped to revitalize his basketball career, but he couldn’t garner any interest because he hadn’t played organized basketball in three years.The only coach who wanted him was the head coach at West Liberty, Jim Crutchfield, who had seen Monteroso develop. West Liberty gave him a familiar setting to turn back the clock and be a basketball player again.“(When he went to Purdue) I kind of thought he’s got some basketball ability,” Crutchfield said. “I thought it’d be a shame if he never played basketball again.”Jeff Monteroso said last summer was solely filled with basketball workouts for Monteroso. The plan, Jeff said, was for Monteroso to play only basketball at West Liberty. About a week before football preseason-camp began, he changed his tune.Courtesy of West Liberty AthleticsWhen the two sat with WLU head football coach, Roger Waialae, the coach jumped at the opportunity to add a player with the experience and ability of Monteroso. He put up big numbers, catching 14 touchdowns, and used his experience to take less-experienced players under his wing.“He was helping some of the younger kids,” Jeff Monteroso said. “They would listen to him. He would give them advice.”West Liberty’s basketball team is glad to have him, too. The Hilltoppers are 19-1 and Monteroso averages a team-high 18.3 points per game. West Liberty ranks No. 3 in NCAA Division II.Based upon NCAA eligibility rules, Monteroso’s football career concluded this fall. His time as a basketball player will continue for one more season beyond this one.Monteroso has pursued his master’s degree with a focus on coaching education — he’s always wanted to be a college football coach — while playing two sports near his hometown.“It was nice to kind of come back home,” Monteroso said. “It kind of was just a perfect fit.” Commentslast_img read more