Jeron Teng glad to see familiar face at sidelines in Altamirano

first_imgMOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Jazul, Fuel Masters confident of smooth transition under Alas “I’m so happy because coach Eric has been a mentor to me. I’ve learned a lot from him since high school and I’m glad that we could continue our partnership here in Alaska,” the 23-year-old said.Teng has had a fruitful past with Altamirano dating back to their days in the Philippine under-18 national team.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBack on the throneIt is also under the veteran mentor’s guidance that the former La Salle stalwart showcased his full potential, averaging 22.15 points, 6.85 rebounds, and 5.77 assists for Flying V in the 2017 Foundation Cup, while also setting the league record for most triple-doubles at three.But Teng is aware that the PBA is a whole different ballgame, and he just feels lucky to have someone like Altamirano to guide him through the nuances of the pro game. OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View comments Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny “Coach Eric has been giving me tips on how to play here in the PBA. But I know that it’s not gonna be easy and I have to earn my playing minutes. I really have to work hard for it,” he said.Still, Teng couldn’t help but feel positive with what the future holds for the Aces this upcoming 2018 PBA season.“I’m very optimistic for our team. The coaching staff is very experienced in the PBA and Alaska is one of those top-notch organizations in this league. I expect I can really learn a lot of things here,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Jeron Teng. Photo by Randolph B. Leongson/ INQUIRER.netJeron Teng wasn’t the lone Flying V Thunder who found his way in Alaska, as coach Eric Altamirano followed suit as an assistant coach for coach Alex Compton.And the fifth overall pick in the 2017 PBA couldn’t be more thankful to have a familiar face by his side as he begins this new journey in the pro league.ADVERTISEMENT Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set LATEST STORIES Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hourslast_img read more

Northeast BC Midget and Bantam Predators in Penticton for Fire and Ice Tournament

first_imgFast forward to the final game, the Bantam Predators would face the Vernon Vipers. The Bantam Predators would wrap up their weekend with a loss of 7-3 to Vernon.Advertisement In the Bantam Division, the Predators took on Sherwood Park for game one of the Tournament. This was a close game but in the end, the Predators would fall short 3-2 to Sherwood Park. For game two of the Tournament, the Midgets faced the Penticton Female Midget team. The Predators were able to shut out Penticton with a score of 3-0. The Midget Predators took on Williams Lake in game one of the Tournament. The Predators battled hard but were unable to win this game, ending with a final score of 5-1 under Williams Lake.center_img – Advertisement -Then in game three, the Midget Predators would take on the Washington Midget Female. The Predators won this game with a 5-2 win over Washington. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Northeast B.C. Midget and Bantam Predators were on the road to Penticton over the weekend, November 22 to the 24, for the Fire and Ice Tournament.last_img read more

Study suggests women in biomedical sciences have equal chance of success in

first_img Potential gender bias against female researchers in peer review of research grants © 2018 Phys.org A team of researchers at the National Institutes of Health has found that women in biomedical sciences are just as successful as men in sustaining grant funding. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of grant approval rates for men and women in the biomedical sciences. Citation: Study suggests women in biomedical sciences have equal chance of success in sustaining grant funding (2018, July 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-women-biomedical-sciences-equal-chance.html Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domaincenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More information: Lisa A. Hechtman et al. NIH funding longevity by gender, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1800615115AbstractWomen have achieved parity with men among biomedical science degree holders but remain underrepresented in academic positions. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the world’s largest public funder of biomedical research—receives less than one-third of its new grant applications from women. Correspondingly, women compose less than one-third of NIH research grantees, even though they are as successful as men in obtaining first-time grants. Our study examined women’s and men’s NIH funding trajectories over time (n = 34,770), exploring whether women remain funded at the same rate as men after receiving their first major research grants. A survival analysis demonstrated a slightly lower funding longevity for women. We next examined gender differences in application, review, and funding outcomes. Women individually held fewer grants, submitted fewer applications, and were less successful in renewing grants—factors that could lead to gender differences in funding longevity. Finally, two adjusted survival models that account for initial investigator characteristics or subsequent application behavior showed no gender differences, suggesting that the small observed longevity differences are affected by both sets of factors. Overall, given men’s and women’s generally comparable funding longevities, the data contradict the common assumption that women experience accelerated attrition compared with men across all career stages. Women’s likelihood of sustaining NIH funding may be better than commonly perceived. This suggests a need to explore women’s underrepresentation among initial NIH grantees, as well as their lower rates of new and renewal application submissions. Prior research has shown that despite receiving approximately half of all advanced degrees in the biomedical sciences, women are still vastly underrepresented in tenured positions at major universities. It has been suggested by some in the field that part of the reason for this disparity is the view held by many women who pursue advanced degrees that they will have limited opportunities should they pursue an academic career path. The researchers note that such a path generally involves becoming successful at applying for grants to carry out research. The researchers further suggest that many women believe this path is biased against women and thus choose to pursue careers in the corporate world as a more viable alternative. But are such beliefs justified? That is what the researchers sought to learn.To find out, the researchers ran queries on databases maintained by NIH that hold information regarding grants for the years 1991 through 2010. In so doing, they compared rates of success for first-time applicants as well as for those who apply for and receive grants repeatedly. They found that male first-time applicants far outnumbered female first-time applicants. But they also found that the rates of success for women who applied for and received grants repeatedly were much closer. And when they compared success rates by age and amount of education, they found that the rates were nearly identical for the two genders. The researchers suggest that this indicates that the so-called “leaky pipeline” is not applicable to women in the biomedical sciences. They further suggest that there is a degree of misinformation surrounding opportunities for women in the biomedical sciences and that more needs to be done to counteract it. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more