QPR forward ‘set for Brentford’

first_imgRob Hulse could join Brentford, according to the Daily Mirror.It is claimed the Bees are looking to take him on loan from QPR, where he is not part of manager Mark Hughes’ plans.Hulse, who turns 33 next month, is one of a number of players Hughes is keen to offload.Luke Young, DJ Campbell and keeper Radek Cerny have also been tipped to leave Loftus Road on loan.Brentford enquired about Hulse in March but Hughes was reluctant to loan out any of his 25-man squad, which the striker was then part of.Related West London Sport story: Brentford ask about QPR striker (16 March)Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Has Anti-Semitism Been Good for Jewish Evolution?

first_imgNational Geographic News gave favorable coverage to a controversial theory by anthropologists at University of Utah that anti-semitism was a form of natural selection.  The racism against Jews in Europe, while selecting for higher intelligence, also selected for certain types of diseases.  Reporter James Owen did point out that not all anthropologists agree with the hypothesis that IQ differences can have a genetic basis.That such poor reasoning and lousy science would get prominent coverage in the leading popular geographic magazine in the world is an illustration of the pernicious influence of evolutionary thinking on our society.  This hypothesis downplays the intellectual and moral factors involved.  Consistently followed, it would lead one to believe that anti-Semitism has been a good thing, if it led to the genius of Einstein.  If this kind of sloppy research, based on faulty assumptions and selective statistics, were published in some other field, it would be quickly scorned by academics.  The phrase “natural selection” is like a free pass around the security guards of science.  Should evolutionary anthropologists watch an Auschwitz as detached observers, measuring what genetic traits are being naturally selected by the process?  It’s time to call moral evils evil instead of rationalizing them on evolutionary grounds.  Let’s see how they explain it when the public has had enough, and there is a widespread outcry against Darwinian thinking.  Would that prove survival of the fittest ideas?(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

A level playing field

first_imgThis fusion has allowed Amandla EduFootball to develop a healthy attitude towards education in the children taking part in its programmes, using their love of sport as incentive. (Image: Amandla EduFootball, via Facebook)As the name suggests, Amandla EduFootball capitalises on the widespread love of the beautiful game to get children to engage with education by fusing the two, creating a single vehicle to uplift and empower the country’s youth.This fusion has allowed Amandla EduFootball to develop a healthy attitude towards education in the children taking part in its programmes, using their love of sport as incentive.Florian Zech and Leonora Reid, who were working at a children’s home in Cape Town before founding Amandla, came to realise the need to give children in residential care the opportunity to take part in sports and life skills building activities during their down time.The idea of creating an “education through sport” programme seemed to be an ideal way of engaging and stimulating pupils after school while also drawing their attention away from negative influences such as substance abuse and violence.Today more than 3 000 children take part in the organisation’s activities every week – and this number is growing steadily. This continued growth shows the relevance and impact of sports in education and the development of young minds.Amandla’s focus on fair play aims to encourage children to develop their team work skills, their attitude towards other children as well as their ability to deal with conflict. (Image:Amandla EduFootbal, via Facebook)TUTORING PROGRAMME AND FAIRPLAYBy combining daily homework sessions with football, Amandla EduFootball’s tutoring programme helps learners to improve their academic performance. It also gives them ongoing support.These sessions help to get the children past areas where they may be struggling at school and help them to improve their performances all round, giving them a strong foundation to build on later on in their school careers.EduFootball also runs football leagues among the children taking part in its programmes. The points tallies in the league combine the scores of each of the matches with fair play points given to team members.These fair play points serve as indicators to track the improvement in behaviour among team members and the opposition and encourage them to develop their team work skills, their attitude towards other children as well as their ability to deal with conflict.GET INVOLVED IN EDUFOOTBALL“Our experience and research tells us that we cannot achieve a sustainable impact in marginalised communities without in-depth collaboration,” Zech explains, touching on the importance of getting support from the public and corporations for non-profit organisations such as Amandla EduFootball to succeed.“The ability to bring together partners from all sectors allows us to create lasting change among our youth and communities.”If you want to help improve the lives of the many children benefiting from the efforts of Amandla EduFootball, visit its website for details about how to get involved.The organisation welcomes volunteers who want to work directly with the children during the day to day activities at their facilities. If you would prefer to donate to the cause, visit the donate page for information on how to do so.For more information, contact Amandla EduFootball on 021 447 8261 or via email at info@edufootball.org.PLAY YOUR PARTPlay Your Part urges you to share your story. If you or anyone you know has gone out of their way to brighten up the day for someone else, we want to know.If you have a story to tell, be it your own or that of an organisation or initiative dear to you, submit your story or video to our website and tell us how South Africa is playing a part to build a better life for all.last_img read more

Ohio Agricultural Council awards six scholarships

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Six Ohio high school and college students have been selected to receive scholarships from the Ohio Agricultural Council. The scholarships, each totaling $1,500, were awarded for the 2016-2017 school year.The students, each of whom is pursuing a degree in an agricultural-related area of study, were chosen based on their excellent academic record, outstanding leadership qualities, community involvement, and exceptional essay responses.“The Ohio Agricultural Council is pleased to provide scholarships to help students further their education,” said Jim Chakeres, OAC president. “As one reviewer said, ‘our future is in good hands and very bright!’ We congratulate these young leaders on being selected to receive scholarships for the 2016-17 school year.”The high school student recipients are as follows:• Elizabeth Landis, of Anna, Ohio• Josie Montoney, of Lancaster, Ohio• Garrett Stanfield, of Manchester, OhioThe college student recipients are as follows:• Mary Buehler, of Anna, Ohio• Katie Frost, of Bloomingburg, Ohio• Katie Vorst, of Middle Point, OhioThe students will be recognized at OAC’s annual Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame Awards Program on August 5 at the Ohio State Fair in the new Cardinal Building. As part of the award, the scholarship recipients will also receive a one-year complimentary membership in the Council.For more information visit www.OhioAgCouncil.org.last_img read more

Redefining Passivhaus

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. In January 2012, Katrin Klingenberg, the founder of the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS), announced that her organization would develop a new passive house standard for North America — a standard that differed from the Passivhaus standard developed in Darmstadt, Germany.Writing in her blog in 2012, Klingenberg explained that “it’s time to allow for a modification process to the rigid annual heating and cooling requirement of less or equal to 15 kWh/m²•yr… for the North American continent’s more extreme climates… This idea that we need to adapt the standard to various regions has taken root around the world from domestic energy experts like Martin Holladay, Alex Wilson, and Marc Rosenbaum and to Passive House groups from other countries, like the Swedes.”Almost two years later, Klingenberg made another announcement: the work required to develop the new standard would be partly funded by U.S. taxpayers (through the Department of Energy), and one of the contracts for the required study would be awarded to the Building Science Corporation of Westford, Massachusetts.A few weeks ago, Klingenberg’s first goal was reached when the DOE-funded paper (“Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards”) was published. The report has three authors: Betsy Pettit (from Building Science Corporation), Graham Wright (from PHIUS), and Katrin Klingenberg.In effect, the paper is a draft for a proposed new passive house standard. PHIUS is now inviting the public to comment on the draft standard; after the public comments are reviewed, the standard may be modified before being adopted by PHIUS.A few years ago, PHIUS cut the umbilical cord linking it to Germany. Since then, the U.S. organization has no longer been bound by the German definition of a “Passivhaus.” Because if its recent independence, PHIUS now has a chance to ask an important question: what, exactly, do… center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

Guests check in at swanky Games Village

first_imgThe Games Village, the heart of the upcoming Commonwealth Games in the Capital, had its soft launch on Thursday with organisers claiming that the facilities and ambience at the venue make it one of the best of its kind in the world.A bird’s eye view of the Commonwealth Games Village in New Delhi on Thursday.The Village will be home to more than 7,200 athletes and delegates for the duration of the Games. Some of the participating countries have already started sending their delegates, while the athletes will start arriving from September 23.The Village, situated on the banks of the Yamuna adjacent to the Akshardham temple, has 14 blocks, 34 towers and 1,168 fully-furnished air-conditioned flats, out of which 1,100 will be used to accommodate athletes and delegates.The flats have between two and five bedrooms, with two occupants per room.The Village also has facilities such as a shopping centre, saloon, a bank and two swimming pools too.”One of the pools will be used for leisure and the other, of standard international dimensions, will be for training purposes,” Organising Committee’s additional director general Ashok Kapur said.”The Village also has VIP lounges, a post office, plaza, bar and an informal dining area,” he said.In a first, competitors in four disciplines will be able to train at the Village itself without having to go to the competition venues.”Apart from the swimmers, weightlifters, wrestlers and athletes will be able to train at the Village itself,” Dalbir Singh, mayor of the Games Village, said.advertisement”This facility had not been provided at any previous Commonwealth Games,” Singh said, adding that the paralympic competitors in powerlifting can also train there.The training area for athletes includes an eight-lane track as well as a separate throwing area.There is also seating arrangement for 1,086 people.”In this way, the athletes will save valuable time that they would otherwise have spent travelling to and from the competition venues,” Singh said.In addition, there is a state-of-the-art gymnasium for the residents.”There are machines for weight training, cardio-workouts as well as stretching,” Cyrus Appoo, gymnasium supervisor, said.Some delegates have already started assembling in the Capital with representatives from England, Wales, Scotland, Australia and New Zealand already working on registration formalities.”There are certain basic facilities we provide to all residents. If they want something extra, we will provide them a ‘rate card’ which has pre-determined charges for various facilities,” Kapur said.The soft launch started with an inter-faith prayer where leaders from various religions wished the Games success.”The soft launch is designed to give us a feel about what is required by the time all the athletes arrive. Whatever is missing can be arranged in the next few days as only nuts and bolts need to be looked into,” Kapur said.Organising Committtee chairman Suresh Kalmadi said that there will be daily entertainment programmes in the evenings.last_img read more