STATE REP RACE QA Erin Buckley Explains Why Shes Running Describes Her

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Apple is asking weekly questions to the seven candidates running in contested primaries for the Wilmington/Tewksbury State Representative seat (19th Middlesex).Below, in her own words, are the responses to this week’s questions from candidate Erin Buckley (R-Tewksbury).#1) Why do you want to be our State Representative? (submitted by Mary Kiesinger of Wilmington)I want to have the privilege of being the State Representative for the 19th Middlesex because it is a position of vital importance for which no one would — or could — do a better job than I. I have worked in the State House, twice, once as an intern in the Governor’s Office and once as a Legislative Aide. I sit on Tewksbury’s Finance Committee and its Local Housing Partnership. I know, first hand, what it takes to do this job and I know what Tewksbury and Wilmington need from Beacon Hill. My goal is to streamline the communication between town hall and state house — and it is one I will achieve.#2) Do you consider yourself a liberal, conservative or moderate? Please describe your political ideology. (submitted by Danielle Driscoll of Tewksbury)I am a proud conservative. Where I fall within that umbrella term is also a position of personal pride: I am a classic libertarian. I believe in personal freedom and personal responsibility. I believe that government is here to engage in only the most essential duties that maintain a functioning society. I believe that government is there to help those who cannot help themselves, not those who can but won’t help themselves. I also believe that government is OF the people and FOR the people, and that the shift toward a ruling class of self-designated — or privately appointed — officials is setting both a dangerous and dysfunctional precedent.(NOTE: Do you have a question for the candidates? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com and it may be asked in a future Q&A or in a debate.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE: Voting Records Show Prinzivalli Voted Only Once Before Launching Candidacy; Campaign DisputesIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: 1 Candidate Drops Out, 8 Return Nomination Papers To State Before DeadlineIn “Government”BREAKING NEWS: 19th Middlesex State Rep Election Results Are In — Dave Robertson WinsIn “Government”last_img read more

Melanin from Jurassicera mollusk could lead to new tool for cancer diagnosis

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Eumelanin from the Jurassic-era fossil has a nearly identical pump-probe signature as the eumelanin from its modern counterpart, S. officinalis. The finding that eumelanin survives for millions of years opens the opportunity for pathologists to analyze the eumelanin from decades-old tissue samples of cancer patients in order to better understand the different characteristics of a melanoma that spreads versus a melanoma that does not spread. Credit: Mary Jane Simpson, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society The researchers, Mary Jane Simpson, et al., led by Professor Warren S. Warren at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, have published their paper on their analysis of Jurassic-aged eumelanin in a recent issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.”Melanoma is a particularly bad cancer if it metastasizes,” Warren told Phys.org. “Unfortunately, the ‘gold standard’ of conventional diagnostic techniques (essentially, excision followed by pathology) does not do a very good job of predicting which diagnosed cancers are likely to spread. So, how do you fix a bad gold standard for a bad disease?”The best answer is retrospective studies—looking at decades-old specimens from patients, where you know the outcome—and trying to find systematic differences. That is impossible with most pathology methods because the tissue degrades. Our results show that it is possible with melanin-based diagnostics, since the melanin easily survives that long.”The researchers explain that human skin has two types of melanin, eumelanin and pheomelanin. The distribution of these two types assists in the diagnosis of melanoma skin cancer. One way to identify the types of melanin and their distribution in a given sample is to use a molecular imaging technique called pump-probe microscopy. Basically, an ultrafast laser pulse is first used to “pump,” or optically excite, the molecules. Then after a short time delay, one or more follow-up pulses are emitted to “probe” the molecules. By measuring how the probe pulses are absorbed or reflected by the molecules, researchers can obtain a pump-probe signature that reveals information on the molecules’ excitation decay process. Since eumelanin and pheomelanin have different pump-probe signatures, this technique enables scientists to distinguish between them. Citation: Melanin from Jurassic-era mollusk could lead to new tool for cancer diagnosis (2013, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-melanin-jurassic-era-mollusk-tool-cancer.html Here, the researchers compared the pump-probe signatures of the eumelanin from the ink sack of a Jurassic-era cephalopod (an ancient molluscan marine animal) with that of a modern cephalopod, the common cuttlefish. (Despite its name, cuttlefish are mollusks, not fish.) Although the Jurassic-era cephalopod is 162 million years older than its modern counterpart, the eumelanin pump-probe signatures of the two animals are essentially identical. This finding shows that eumelanin is extremely stable, and could potentially permit researchers to image archived tissue samples from deceased cancer patients and uncover more information than could be obtained through more traditional methods that analyze other, less stable chemicals. Squid ink from Jurassic period identical to modern squid ink, study shows Journal information: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters The researchers pointed out that they did find some variations in the eumelanin signatures from the two mollusks. However, they could trace these variations to the larger iron content in the ancient eumelanin compared with the modern sample. Eumelanin from the common cuttlefish is normally bound to a variety of transition metals such as iron, copper, and manganese, but washing the eumelanin with the solid acid EDTA removes the majority of the bound metals. When the researchers washed the ancient eumelanin with EDTA, its signature closely matched that of the modern, mostly iron-free eumelanin. Because iron affects the pump-probe signature of eumelanin, the microscopy technique could also potentially enable researchers to approximate the iron content of a sample. For example, pigmented human tissue often exhibits a wide range of pump-probe signatures, and some of the variation may be due to metal ion binding by the melanin. In the future, pathologists may use this knowledge to their advantage when investigating the molecular composition of eumelanin samples. Explore further © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. More information: Mary Jane Simpson, et al. “Pump-Probe Microscopic Imaging of Jurassic-Aged Eumelanin.” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2013, 4, 1924-1927. DOI: 10.1021/jz4008036 Common cuttlefish. ©Jarek Tuszynski / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0 & GDFL (Phys.org) —In a world where things seem to change overnight, melanin seems to stay essentially the same for more than 160 million years, a new study has found. Melanin is the biological pigment that determines an animal’s color, and is currently not very well understood. In the new study, scientists have found that a type of melanin called eumelanin from a Jurassic-era mollusk produces a signature when optically excited that is nearly identical to that of the optically excited eumelanin from its modern counterpart, Sepia officinalis, or the common cuttlefish. Because melanin survives so long, an analysis of the melanin from old cancerous tissue samples could give researchers a useful tool for predicting the spread of melanoma skin cancer in humans.last_img read more

What DDoS Attacks Are and How to Survive Them

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Illustration from Shutterstock.comNever heard of a DDoS attack? Small companies that do business online ought to learn about this growing online threat — and figure out how they’ll respond should one ever hit them.Consider what happened to Los Angeles-based business-planning publishing and advisory company Growthink. Last September, a surprise flood of bogus traffic knocked its website off the internet for several days. Growthink turned to its hosting firm for help, only to have its website sidelined so other sites wouldn’t be collateral damage. It finally recovered by hiring a DDoS-protection firm, BlockDos, to filter out the bad traffic. Then it moved to a new hosting service, Rackspace, so it would be better prepared next time.”It was pretty intense,” says Kevin McGinn, Growthink’s IT director. “We had no idea why we were being singled out.”Growthink had suffered a “distributed denial-of-service” attack. In a DDoS attack, legitimate site visitors are denied access by hackers who immobilize the site either with a flood of bogus internet traffic or a surgical strike that exhausts the resources of a specific web application. Successful attacks can cripple business operations. Growthink estimates its website outage erased $50,000 in revenue.Related: Why You Might Need to Rethink Your Internet Security — NowAs Growthink discovered, it isn’t always clear who’s out to get you. Experts say e-commerce outfits and other businesses that rely heavily on the web for their livelihoods are most at risk. Smaller companies are most often attacked by unscrupulous competitors and extortionists, although disgruntled former employees, vandals and “hacktivists,” or hackers with a political agenda, are also known culprits.With both the number and ferocity of attacks rising, DDoS incidents are a growing threat. In the last year, CloudFlare, a San Francisco cloud-based web performance and security firm, said it has seen a 700 percent rise in DDoS traffic.Small companies are increasingly finding themselves in the crosshairs, experts say, as the cost of mounting attacks drops and large companies get better at stopping them. Attackers can rent “botnets” of 1,000 hijacked malware-infected home PCs capable of taking down sites of most small-to-medium-sized businesses for only $400 a week, according to Incapsula, a competitor to CloudFlare that’s a subsidiary of security firm Imperva, both of Redwood Shores, Calif.Even modest extortionists can profit. Australian e-commerce company Endless Wardrobe received an email in May demanding $3,500 via Western Union. When the firm didn’t comply, its site was knocked offline for a week by a torrent of bogus visits. The downtime cut revenue by at least the amount of the demanded ransom.Here are tips on how to survive if you find your business under a DDoS attack, too.Related: How to Make Your Website Hacker-ProofFind a hosting service or ISP that will help. Many hosting services put large numbers of small websites on the same servers to boost efficiency. That’s fine until one site is attacked and the hosting company takes it offline so other customers on the server aren’t hurt as well.Check your contracts and speak with your hosting service or internet service provider, or ISP, to find out what it will do if you come under attack. Will it help you stop the attack and recover, and if so, at what cost? Will it send you a giant bill because an attack generated a ton of extra traffic to your site?A growing number of these service providers are offering security features, including DDoS protection, as a way to differentiate themselves in a crowded market. Such companies, which often employ technology from specialists such as Arbor Networks, include Firehost, Rackspace and iWeb.Hire help.Companies that provide website acceleration services also often help fend off DDoS attacks. For instance, CloudFlare provides a free basic level of DDoS protection that it says will stop most attacks, and two tiers of service at $20 and $200 a month that can stop larger attacks. Incapsula includes DDoS protection as part of its Enterprise tier of service for an undisclosed fee.If you’re targeted with a highly sophisticated attack, however, you may want to consider hiring a DDoS-protection specialist, such as Prolexic, a cloud-based security company based in Hollywood, Fla.Investigate ways to fortify your site.CloudFlare co-founder and CEO Matthew Prince suggests using nginx web server software — favored by the likes of Netflix and WordPress — because it can be more resistant to DDoS than other programs. He also recommends using the latest versions of your web software, such as WordPress and shopping carts, to prevent some application-based attacks.Related: How to Determine If Cyber Insurance Coverage Is Right for You August 2, 2012 4 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

8 FarOut Jetsons Contraptions That Actually Exist Today

first_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Free The Jetsons, that candy-colored cartoon about a family living in the future, was actually a bit of a time traveler.It premiered in 1962 on ABC and was the network’s first show to ever be broadcast in color. But this new-age way of viewing a television show didn’t help The Jetsons, as it only lasted 24 episodes before being cancelled thanks to poor ratings. The production company Hanna-Barbera (the minds behind The Flintstones and Scooby-Doo) gave it another shot and revived it in the ’80s with new episodes that ran in syndication from 1985 to 1987. The cartoon wasn’t around for all that long compared to some of its contemporaries, but its impact is an enduring one. True, there are some aspects of it that are a bit dated — you don’t see a lot of parents naming their sons Elroy nowadays — but it was remarkably prescient about where technology was headed.From interactive newspapers to video chatting, here are some of the inventions from The Jetsons that are a part of our world today.1. Flying cars.Image credit: Jetsons / AeromobilGeorge Jetson’s flying car converted into a portable briefcase, which is arguably pretty cool. While the car improvements haven’t trended in that direction just yet, the team at Slovakian startup AeroMobil is hard at work on a car that can turn into an airplane and vice versa. At this year’s SXSW, co-founder and CEO Juraj Vaculik said that their invention could arrive in 2017.Read more: At SXSW: The Flying Car Could Come as Early as 20172. Jetpacks. Image credit: Jetsons / AquaxflyerThere were jetpacks a plenty in the Jetsons universe, to get people everywhere from school to the dry cleaners. And while they aren’t available for general consumption just yet, startups like AquaFlyer, Martin JetPack and Jet Pack International are working towards that dream of commuting via jetpack a reality.Read more: The Man Making Jet Packs Possible3. Robotic help. Image credit: Jetsons / A.L.O. the BotlrThe Jetsons irascible housekeeper Rosie would feel right at home with the robotic butlers and concierge’s employed at the Henn-na Hotel in Japan and Aloft Hotel in California.Read more: This Robotic Butler Could Make Your Next Hotel Stay…Interesting4. Holograms. Image credit: Jetsons / PulseWhile in recent years, hologram versions of entertainers like Michael Jackson and Tupac Shakur have appeared at the Billboard Music Awards and Coachella, the “performances” yielded a fair few legal implications – so not quite the blithe holographic tree that the Jetsons family used to ring in the holiday season but fascinating nonetheless.Read more: Smoke and Mirrors: Why We Aren’t Seeing More Digital Zombies Like Michael JacksonRelated: 7 Business Lessons for Entrepreneurs From ‘Parks and Recreation’5. 3-D printed food.Image credit: Jetsons / ChefJetThe Jetsons family had a home food replicator that could churn out anything from asparagus to stroganoff. Now companies like Foodini and CojoJet are making it possible to create delicious 3-D printed entrees and desserts.Read more: From Eye Shadow to Entire Houses: 7 of the Craziest 3-D Printed Creations Yet 6. Drones. Image credit: Jetsons / Stephen WarrenerIn that classic intro, the Jetsons kids get delivered to school via flying pods. Though they aren’t dropping off people in their preferred locations yet, drones are being implemented to deliver packages, and taking aerial footage for industries as varied as movie making and real estate.Read more: Star Wars + Drones = Dreams Come True 7. Smart shoes. Image credit: Jetsons / Lesia TrubatAt one point during the ’80s run of episodes, George Jetson is saddled with a pair of shoes that have a mind of their own. Spanish designer Lesia Trubat González came up with the idea for E-Traces, ballet shoes outfitted with sensors that record dancers movements onto an app to then help them improve and teach others.Read more: These ‘Smart’ Ballet Shoes Digitally Paint Dancers’ Fancy Footwork 8. Smartwatches. Image credit: Jetsons / AppleWhat was a simple accessory for quick and easy calling and video chatting in the Jetsons universe has made some waves lately with all manner of tech companies trying to get in on the smartwatch market. Apple launched the Apple Watch amid much fanfare in April and Pebble’s latest product made for the most funded Kickstarter campaign ever, taking in more than $20 million from the company’s loyal customers.Read more: The One Reason You Should Want to Buy a SmartwatchRelated: 7 Business Lessons From Ross, Rachel and the Rest of the ‘Friends’ Crew April 17, 2015center_img 4 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.last_img read more