Ohio Agricultural Council awards six scholarships

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Six Ohio high school and college students have been selected to receive scholarships from the Ohio Agricultural Council. The scholarships, each totaling $1,500, were awarded for the 2016-2017 school year.The students, each of whom is pursuing a degree in an agricultural-related area of study, were chosen based on their excellent academic record, outstanding leadership qualities, community involvement, and exceptional essay responses.“The Ohio Agricultural Council is pleased to provide scholarships to help students further their education,” said Jim Chakeres, OAC president. “As one reviewer said, ‘our future is in good hands and very bright!’ We congratulate these young leaders on being selected to receive scholarships for the 2016-17 school year.”The high school student recipients are as follows:• Elizabeth Landis, of Anna, Ohio• Josie Montoney, of Lancaster, Ohio• Garrett Stanfield, of Manchester, OhioThe college student recipients are as follows:• Mary Buehler, of Anna, Ohio• Katie Frost, of Bloomingburg, Ohio• Katie Vorst, of Middle Point, OhioThe students will be recognized at OAC’s annual Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame Awards Program on August 5 at the Ohio State Fair in the new Cardinal Building. As part of the award, the scholarship recipients will also receive a one-year complimentary membership in the Council.For more information visit www.OhioAgCouncil.org.last_img read more

Business Leaders Offer Advice for Keeping Fort Monmouth Reuse on Track

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR To motorists passing by the former Fort Monmouth on the New Jersey Shore, it’s easy to get the impression that reuse efforts are going slowly, with little visible progress to see more than four years after the post closed.But the truth is that momentum has been building through the efforts of the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority, and more concrete signs of redevelopment are just around the corner, according to the LRA.“We really see next year as being the turning point for the redevelopment of the fort,” said David Nuse, the LRA’s director of real estate development. “They’ll see buildings being renovated, companies moving in, some tangible changes that will really set the table for what the fort is going to be in the next 10 years,” Nuse said, reported the Asbury Park Press.The redevelopment authority so far has obtained about 550 acres of the property from the Army and it plans to complete the purchase of another 550 acres by this coming spring, he said.One of the reuse project’s first major successes was attracting a new $146 million headquarters for Commvault on a 55-acre tract. The building, paid for by the technology firm, opened one year ago.At a forum sponsored by the Asbury Park Press, eight local business leaders last week proposed several ways for the reuse project to pick up speed:find more Commvaults — additional property sales would help fund efforts to spruce up the site and attract more businesses and residents;do a better job of opening up the site to the public;foster the growth of startups;improve the region’s commuter train service; andadd other missing pieces, such as a high-speed, fiber optic network and light rail service on the Jersey Shore.“I don’t want to have to move to Boston or Austin. I love it here. It’s a matter of putting the pieces in place that will create a self-organizing system, which will then create momentum,” said Jennifer Crews, the founder and CEO of Flock, a technology company in nearby Red Bank.last_img read more

Motorcyclist killed in road crash

first_imgA motorcyclist was killed as a covered van hit his vehicle in Mansurabad area of Chattogram city early Sunday.The deceased is Md Mirza, reports UNB.The accident took place when the van hit the motorcycle in front of the regional passport office around 2:00am, leaving him critically injured, said Chittagong Medical College Hospital (CMCH) police outpost constable Amir Hossain.He was brought to the hospital where the duty doctors declared him dead, the constable added.last_img

Subscription Fatigue Nearly Half of US Consumers Frustrated by Streaming Explosion Study

first_imgStreaming entertainment is smacking into the wall of the paradox of choice — and the cost to consumers of piecing multiple services together.The boom in subscription streaming services has given consumers more options than ever, with an array that includes Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, CBS All Access, Showtime and YouTube Premium. Even more are coming down the pike with Apple, Disney, WarnerMedia, NBCUniversal and others promising to enter the fray in a big way.But the plethora of options has a downside: Nearly half (47%) of U.S. consumers say they’re frustrated by the growing number of subscriptions and services required to watch what they want, according to the 13th edition of Deloitte’s annual Digital Media Trends survey. An even bigger pet peeve: 57% said they’re frustrated when content vanishes because rights to their favorite TV shows or movies have expired. Popular on Variety “Consumers want choice — but only up to a point,” said Kevin Westcott, Deloitte vice chairman and U.S. telecom and media and entertainment leader, who oversees the study. “We may be entering a time of ‘subscription fatigue.’”All told, there are more than 300 over-the-top video options in the U.S. With that fragmentation, there’s a clear opportunity for larger platforms to reaggregate these services in a way that can provide access across all sources and make recommendations based on all of someone’s interests, Westcott said. “Consumers are looking for less friction in the consumption process,” he said.Today, the average U.S. consumer subscribes to three video streaming services; 43% subscribe to both pay-TV and streaming services, per Deloitte’s study. Effectively, Westcott said, they’re cobbling together their own entertainment bundles from multiple providers.Again, the sprawl of content options presents headaches. Nearly half (49%) of consumers in Deloitte’s survey said the sheer amount of content available on subscription VOD makes it hard to choose what to watch. Meanwhile, consumers say they know exactly what they want to watch 69% of the time, but 48% say content is hard to find across multiple services. And 49% give up on searching for content if they can’t find it in a few minutes.Deloitte’s survey found strong growth in streaming video subscription services — with 69% of households now subscribing to one or more — and streaming music services (41%). Pay TV remained relatively flat with 65% of U.S. households subscribing to cable, satellite or telco TV.Other findings from Deloitte’s study:Originals drive subscriptions: High-quality original content continues to be a dominant factor in streaming video growth, with 57% of all current U.S. streaming consumers (and 71% of millennials, ages 22-35) saying they subscribe to streaming video services to access original content.TV ad loads: 75% of consumers say they would be more satisfied with pay-TV service if there were fewer ads, and 77% said ads on pay TV should be under 10 seconds. Respondents indicated 8 minutes of ads per hour of programming was the reasonable upper bound — while they also said that 16 minutes or more of commercials per hour is the point they would stop watching.Data privacy: Consumers are increasingly wary of how companies handle their data, with 82% saying they don’t believe companies do enough to protect their personal data. Just 7% of respondents believe the government should play a role in protecting their data.Voice assistants: Ownership of voice-enabled home speakers grew 140% year-over-year in 2018, with total penetration soaring from 15% to 36%. The top five uses of voice-enabled digital assistants are playing music, searching for information, getting directions, making phone calls and setting alerts. However, half of consumers said they don’t use voice-enabled digital assistants at all, and only 18% claimed to use if daily.Video games: 41% of U.S. consumers play games at least weekly; among Gen Z (14-21) consumers, 54% do. Gaming consoles are being used more often as an entertainment hub — to stream TV/movie content (46%), watch online content (42%), browse the internet (34%), stream music (25%), and stream eSports (11%).Esports: One-third of U.S. consumers watch esports at least once a week — and 54% of Gen Z respondents do.The U.S. data for the 13th edition of Deloitte’s Digital Media Trends survey was collected from an online survey of 2,003 consumers fielded from December 2018 to February 2019. Additional findings from the study are available at this link.center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Britains Pompeii reveals new clues about life during the Bronze Age

first_imgThought the site is no longer situated on a river, it is quite wet, which is helping to preserve artifacts. The researchers plan to remove them all because it is believed the water level in the areas is likely to fall, removing their natural protective blanket. © 2016 Phys.org Glass beads thought to have been from a necklace. More information: Press release Bronze Age textile made from plant fibres. The site was first discovered back in 2006, but it was only recently that excavations began—a joint effort between the University of Cambridge and Historic England. Items from the houses which sit approximately two meters below ground level, have been dated to approximately 1000-800 BC, which puts them near the end of the Bronze Age—a time dominated by tools and weapons made by mixing copper and tin, from roughly 2500, to 1000 BC. In Britain, the Bronze Age has been extended to approximately 800 BC—it ended when visitors from overseas introduced implements made of iron. Because of the arrangement, the researchers believe the houses were abandoned very quickly, likely due to the fire, which allowed for the preservation of objects as they existed in the everyday lives of people during that time period.Thus far, workers digging at the site have uncovered pots and pans of varying sizes, spears and daggers, exotic glass beads and even textiles that had been fashioned from tree bark. They have also uncovered the charred remains of the timbers that once served as stilts, allowing those living in the house to exist as if on their own tiny island. A human skull has also been found near one entrance, but it has not yet been studied in detail, thus it is not known if it might have belonged to one of the inhabitants of the house. The team has also identified footprints in the sediment. Detail on a 6.3m oak logboat. Close up of stilts and collapsed roof timbers. Explore further Close up of stilts and collapsed roof timbers. Close up of charred wooden bucket base. Citation: Britain’s ‘Pompeii’ reveals new clues about life during the Bronze Age (2016, January 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-britain-pompeii-reveals-clues-life.html Late Iron Age baldric ring with La Tène style decoration, probably part of a shoulder belt for carrying a sword. Shifting sand dunes reveal hidden Bronze Age settlement (Phys.org)—A team of archeologists working at a dig site in Cambridgeshire in Britain has found what they are describing as Britain’s ‘Pompeii’—evidence of everyday life in an ancient society, covered by mud—and the best preserved Bronze Age dwelling ever found in that country. The find consists of two circular wooden houses that once stood atop stilts over a river—when the houses caught fire, they collapsed into the river and were covered by silt, which preserved everyday items inside, such as tables and chairs and jewelry, and even food in bowls. Glass beads thought to have been from a necklace. Bronze Age textile made from plant fibres. Late Iron Age baldric ring with La Tène style decoration, probably part of a shoulder belt for carrying a sword. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more