Latest: Chelsea 2 Crystal Palace 1 – Blues lead but visitors begin to threaten

first_imgGoals from Fernando Torres and Ramires left Chelsea edging towards a win that would take them to within two points of Premier League leaders Arsenal.The Blues, who face Arsenal a week on Monday, went ahead when Torres tucked away the rebound after Willian’s low shot had been tipped onto the post by Crystal Palace keeper Julian Speroni.And Branislav Ivanovic missed a great chance to double the lead when he fired wide after being put through by Juan Mata’s delightful back-heel.Chelsea seemed to be in control but switched off at the back and Marouane Chamakh equalised just before the half-hour mark, steering home from nine yards out after being found by Joel Ward’s ball in from the left.But Ramires struck five minutes later, collecting Eden Hazard’s pass and sending a 25-yard shot beyond the motionless Speroni into the corner of the net.Mata, back in the starting line-up along with Michael Essien, scuffed a shot wide following good work on the left by Willian early in the second half.At the other end, Cameron Jerome’s effort went wide before Petr Cech was twice called into action.Jason Puncheon’s drive forced a good save from the Chelsea keeper, who was also able to gather Damien Delaney’s close-range header.Chelsea (4-2-3-1): Cech; Ivanovic, Luiz, Terry, Azpilicueta; Essien, Ramires; Willian, Mata, Hazard, Torres.Subs: Schwarzer, Cole, Lampard, Oscar, Schurrle, Ba, Eto’o.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Plant Lignin Found in Red Algae

first_imgTime to rewrite the textbooks again.  The story of plant evolution is wrong.  Lignin, a chemical that gives wood its stiffness, was thought to be unique to land plants.  Now it has been found in red algae, reported Science Daily, with the title, “Billion-year Revision Of Plant Evolution Timeline May Stem From Discovery Of Lignin In Seaweed.”  This story illustrates that anything is possible in evolutionary biology these days.    According to evolutionists, red algae emerged much earlier than land plants.  How are they going to explain a complex molecule, which is manufactured by a complex process, being found in a more “primitive” life form?  “Because red and green algae likely diverged more than a billion years ago, the discovery of lignin in red algae suggests that the basic machinery for producing lignin may have existed long before algae moved to land.”  But that just seems to restate the problem.  The alternative, though, is even harder to swallow: “Alternatively, algae and land plants may have evolved the identical compound independently, after they diverged.”    The independent evolution of an identical compound in unrelated lines is tantamount to a miracle.  Look what Mark Denny of Stanford said about this: “The pathways, enzymes and genes that go into making this stuff are pretty complicated, so to come up with all those separately would be really, really amazing,”says Denny.  “Anything is possible, but that would be one hell of a coincidence.”Paper View: Denny’s statement warranted a further look at the original paper in Current Biology.1  Sure enough, the only two options were evolutionary, and neither was unproblematic.  “The discovery of polymerized hydroxycinnamyl alcohols (lignin) within the cell walls of a red alga has major evolutionary implications,” they said in a tone of understatement.  Either the ability to synthesize lignin emerged in a single-celled ancestor (with no need for the sturdiness of plant stems), or it emerged by convergent evolution in unrelated lineages.  “Because monolignol synthesis is exceptionally complex, it seems unlikely that Calliarthron [the red alga] and terrestrial plants evolved monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization completely independently,” they confessed (see 05/30/2008, bullet 2).  Why, then, did the title of their paper say this “reveals convergent evolution of cell-wall architecture”?  Perhaps there is a way to get the best of both explanations.  “It seems more likely that relevant pathways, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and polymerization by peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation, may be deeply conserved, having evolved prior to the divergence of red and green algae more than 1 billion years ago.”  If so, “we may expect to find conserved enzymatic pathways and, potentially, evidence of lignification among the multitude of evolutionary intermediates.”  The search is on.    Nevertheless, they did entertain the possibility that red algae and land plants converged on the highly-complex lignin pathways independently.  For support, they pointed to one other case of convergent evolution in lignin synthesis: “For example, angiosperms and the lycopod Selaginella synthesize S lignin via distinct and independently evolved cytochrome-P450-dependent monooxygenases, and production of S lignin in Calliarthron may reflect a third convergent pathway.”  This seems to beg the question that they evolved.  Perhaps two improbabilities are better than one, and three better than two.  Since nothing but evolution is allowed in the explanation, though, those are the choices.  Maybe imagining other uses for lignin in microbes will help:Lignins are thought to have evolved in the green algal lineage as adaptations to terrestrial habitats, facilitating hydraulic transport and contributing to the mechanical stability of upright stems.  However, contrary to the current paradigm, our data indicate that H, G, and S lignins exist within a red alga’s calcified cells that lack hydraulic vasculature and have little need for additional support.  We speculate that lignin biosynthetic pathways may have functioned in the common unicellular ancestor of red and green algae, protecting cells from microbial infection or UV radiation, and in Calliarthron, lignins may orient the fibrillar scaffolding that guides CaCO3 deposition.While we’re speculating, let’s imagine more with the long leash of evolutionary thinking.  There may have been other needs within brainless microbes that provided opportunities for evolutionary invention via “selective pressure.”The presence of G lignin within the secondary walls of peripheral genicular cells may represent convergent evolution of cellular architecture in response to mechanical stress, given that G lignins also concentrate within secondary walls of terrestrial plant fibers.  Selective pressures in the marine environment differ from those on land, but the wind-induced drag forces that presumably contributed to the evolution of wood in terrestrial plants are mirrored by flow-induced drag forces on aquatic algae.  On land, xylem lends mechanical support to erect stems, and in water, genicula provide mechanical support to Calliarthron fronds.  As articulated fronds bend back and forth under breaking waves, bending stresses are amplified within peripheral genicular tissue, which develops thick secondary walls, apparently to resist breakage…. We hypothesize that this putative 3- to 5-fold upregulation of lignin biosynthesis in peripheral genicular cells may be mechanically stimulated by bending stresses imposed by breaking waves.  Similar mechanical on/off switches for lignin accumulation have been noted in terrestrial systems: plants grown in microgravity synthesize less lignin, whereas plants grown in hypergravity synthesize more lignin.  The mechanical consequences of such minute quantities of lignin on genicular material properties may be negligible.  Nevertheless, that genicular tissue contains lignin and is also stronger, stiffer, and yet more extensible than other algal tissues is an intriguing coincidence, and lignin’s potential role in these properties is an area of active research.Their reasoning leaves out a key question.  Their evidence refers only to spots where lignin accumulates in response to mechanical stress.  How did it get there in the first place?  What does accumulation have to do with the origin of the lignin synthesis machinery?  They didn’t say.  The argument merely hints that an applied stress will somehow produce the goods.  Necessity is the mother of invention.    Having earlier admitted that lignin synthesis is “exceptionally complex,” it is perhaps surprising to hear them land on the side of convergent evolution in their concluding paragraph.  Their last sentence included overt teleological language:Convergent evolution of cell structure and development in Calliarthron genicula and terrestrial xylem may clarify lignin biosynthesis and lend insight into the early evolution of land plants.  It is striking that Calliarthron contains lignified cell walls but evolved from calcified ancestors that lacked water-conducting tracheids or vessels.  Vascular plants may have realized hydraulic transport by tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that initially evolved to fortify unicellular walls and were later adapted to provide biomechanical support.With funding from the National Science Foundation, Patrick Martone (co-author with Denny) is continuing work on this surprising discovery.  Science Daily ended, “Martone says the research team has started looking for billion-year-old lignin genes that might be shared among land plants and red algae, and has started exploring whether lignin exists in other aquatic algae and what role it plays in the evolution and function of aquatic plants.”1.  Martone, Estevez, Lu, Ruel, Denny, Somerville and Ralph, “Discovery of Lignin in Seaweed Reveals Convergent Evolution of Cell-Wall Architecture,” Current Biology, Volume 19, Issue 2, 27 January 2009, Pages 169-175, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2008.12.031.Darwinism is supposed to be this law-governed, enlightened, mechanistic, scientific theory that gives rational explanations for observed phenomena in nature.  Pray tell, what is the difference between their evolutionary explanation and that of a shaman?  We have just seen these scientists invoke spirits.  They called on the spirit of convergent evolution, the spirit of Tinker Bell, and the spirit of vascular plants tapping into ancient biosynthetic pathways that “initially evolved to fortify” cell walls of microbes.  These purpose-driven spirits produced lignin biosynthesis machinery on demand, just because of environmental stress.  Miraculous (see 03/25/2003).  “Anything is possible,” Denny said.  At least Christians have a sufficient Cause when they say, “With God, all things are possible.”    When you learn to look past the big words and identify the key passages in a scientific paper, it’s like taking your gaze off the Wizard of Oz act and pulling up the curtain where the charlatan is hiding.  A theory that says “anything can happen,” even coincidences that are “really, really amazing” can explain anything.  Is this enlightened?  Is this progressive?  Is this rational?  No matter what the observations, the Darwin Party has carte blanche to say “It evolved, because stuff happens” (09/15/2008).  To get really disgusted, read how the Astrobiology Magazine spun this finding in to a positive for evolution!  “The team’s finding provides a new perspective on the early evolution of lignified support tissues – such as wood – on land, since the seaweed tissues that are most stressed by waves crashing on shore appear to contain the most lignin, possibly contributing to mechanical support, says Martone.”  This is why we really need to end the one-party rule in science.  The Darwinists have done nothing to stop the rampant, blatant, out-of-control identity theft (05/02/2003) and credit fraud (08/24/2007) that is damaging the public trust (12/18/2002).(Visited 371 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA ‘encouraged’ by G20 growth plan

first_img7 November 2011 South Africa is encouraged by the Group of Twenty’s commitment to an action plan for growth and jobs, President Jacob Zuma said at the conclusion of the G20 summit in Cannes, France on Friday. “We are pleased with the commitment to an Action Plan for Growth and Jobs, which is an undertaking to renew efforts to combat unemployment and promote decent jobs, especially for the youth and others who have been most affected by the economic crisis,” Zuma said. According to the Presidency, the focus on job creation is in line with South Africa’s domestic focus on transforming the economy to promote inclusive growth and decent jobs. Zuma said the sovereign debt crises as well as credit rating downgrades of Eurozone economies had raised fears about a deepening financial crisis in the region. “We welcome the progress made by European leaders in their effort to resolve the current crisis. We urge them to continue to take decisive actions that will build confidence in the global economy.” The two-day summit, which ended on Friday, took place against the background of risks to the global economy, notably the risk posed by financial sector weakness. “We have also urged all G20 member countries to play their part to prevent the negative spill-over effect of the crisis on developing and low-income countries in line with the action plan,” Zuma said. South Africa was concerned that slow growth in the world economy was affecting Africa’s trade, growth and job creation prospects. South Africa’s real GDP growth was expected to remain below its pre-crisis 5% average at 3.5% over the next two years. South Africa also supported calls for ways to address loose monetary policies in advanced economies, while also strongly supporting the continued mainstreaming of development discourse in the G20, Zuma said. Over the course of the summit, South Africa participated and co-chaired the G20 Development Working Group alongside France and Korea. “While we participate in the G20 in a national capacity, we have always been mindful of the concerns of developing countries and the special challenges faced by Africa,” Zuma said. “The success of the development agenda of the G20 is crucial for the long-term credibility and legitimacy of the G20 for developing countries.” South Africa supported recommendations made by the High Level Panel on Infrastructure, premised on the understanding that facilitating increased private sector involvement was essential for enhancing infrastructure financing. Zuma said South Africa also supported the work of the Development Working Group on food security and building resilience in low-income countries, as this was critical in preventing cases of famine such as the one in Somalia. “We welcome chairing of the Development Working Group by Mexico in 2012 and the continued implementation of the Seoul Multi-Year Action Plan to support economic growth in developing countries.” BuaNewslast_img read more

Google Faces Copyright Trial in Chinese Courts

first_imgmike melanson 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Tags:#Google#news#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… While Google continues to digitize everything from the view from the driver’s seat to the contents of your appointment book, their tremendous attempt at digitizing the written word, Google Books, has run into a snag in the most ironic of places – China. While the country is infamous for copyright infringement, especially of intellectual property, it too is working to prevent the unfair use of its citizen’s copyrighted works.Bloomberg reported this morning that Google “has agreed to meet demands from a local writers’ group that it stop scanning and uploading books to the company’s online library without authors’ permission.”The company found itself in a Chinese court last month facing allegations of copyright infringement by Chinese author Mian Mian, whose book can still be seen in preview on the Google service.This certainly isn’t the first time Google has run into complaints over its practices with the project. Last month, the company was convicted of violating France’s copyright laws. A Globe and Mail report on Google’s practices stated that over 80% of the French books offered were still under copyright. The company has also faced criticism in Germany over its Google Books service, where today the German minister of Justice warned that the company may be reaching monopoly status, requiring government intervention.The Bloomberg article notes that in China, Google trails behind the search engineBaidu. This is in a country with more Internet users than the entire population of the United States. But is the problem of supposed copyright infringement a public relations issue in a country where the average consumer sees counterfeit products in nearly every storefront window? While we stand on the side of writers getting paid for their work, we’re not sure this issue would really stand in the way of Google gaining popularity in China.last_img read more

Three killed in BSF firing in Tripura border

first_imgBSF shot dead three tribal villagers, including a woman, at a border location in south Tripura on Friday afternoon. Two villagers sustained injuries in the incident that occurred after residents allegedly attacked a security patrol following seizure of cattle meant for smuggling to Bangladesh.Police said tension was brewing in the tribal-dominated area since March 13 after BSF troops of 31battalion captured seven cattle at Bangamura in Sabroom subdivision. Friday’s incident occurred at Herbatali, near border pillar number 22043RI and 300 meter from Bangladesh border.BSF battalion Commandant T.S. Negi claimed a crowd attacked Assistant Sub Inspector Abhay Singh and Constable Rabi Datta after they foiled another cattle smuggling attempt on Friday afternoon. “Rabi Datta came under attack by people armed with sharp cutting weapons and he fired shots in self defense”, he told The Hindu by phone.He said Rabi Datta was injured in the attack. Mr. Negi said villagers refused to accept medical help from BSF medicos.While Mr. Negi could not give number of casualties, police confirmed death of three villagers. Sur Laxmi Tripura, 35, Min Kumar Tripura, 35 and Pora Kumar Tripura, 35 received bullet shots and died on the spot. Jiban Kumar Tripura and Prem Kumar Tripura were injured.Tension was running high in the area with villagers claiming they were protesting against rape of a tribal woman by BSF personnel before being fired upon. BSF troops were withdrawn from local post in view of current situation.Senior police officials arranged transfer of bodies and injured to a hospital after reaching the incident sport. Tribal political parties condemned the incident and demanded punishment of guilty BSF men.On July 22 last year a BSF trooper shot dead a woman at Tarapukur in Sonamura of Sepahijala district. The assailant allegedly made a rape attempt on young woman before firing.last_img read more

Militant attacks continue in Valley amid shutdown

first_imgJammu cops to donate a day’s salary to martyrs’ kin Tension prevailed in Kashmir Valley for the second consecutive day on Sunday as restrictions continued in parts of Srinagar.Meanwhile, militants opened fire at security forces in three places. In Bijbehara, militants fired at army’s road opening party. “Militants fled immediately after opening a few shots,” said a police spokesman. Militants also opened fire on the Army and CRPF camps in Bijbehara and Budgam on Saturday night.Meanwhile in south Kashmir, where two civilians and three militants died in Friday’s gunfight, a spontaneous shutdown impacted life. There were also sporadic incidents of stone-pelting.Locals alleged security forces barged into their residences following an incident of stone pelting in Astan Pora in Anantnag and “thrashed inmates”.Meanwhile, train services resumed services after halting it for two days. The service on Budgam-Srinagar-Anantnag- Qazigund- Banihal track has been resumed, said an official. Most separatist leaders were also placed under house arrest.A 26-year-old youth, who was injured after unknown gunmen opened fire at him at Pingleena area of Pulwama in south Kashmir on Saturday evening, succumbed to injuries in Srinagar hospital on Saturday night.The victim has been identified as Aijaz Ahmad Malik. He had received two bullets in the abdomen.Also Read  ‘No threat to pilgrims’Hurriyat chairman Syed Ali Geelani said on Sunday that there was no terror threat to the Amarnath Yatra pilgrims.“The people of Kashmir have always been friendly and generous to visitors, especially the Amarnath pilgrims. They have treated the Amarnath pilgrims with unique hospitality,” he said.“An adverse propaganda is being launched by the media suggesting that the pilgrims are facing a threat from the people of the State. Terror threat to the Amarnath Yatra is a brazen lie, aimed at maligning the people’s movement,” he said. He said the people of Kashmir “are not against any religion.” “Fanatical forces in India are desperate to give a bad name to the freedom movement and are relying on negative propaganda…”last_img read more

CBI summons Lalu and Tejashwi again

first_imgThe Central Bureau of Investigation has issued fresh summons to Rashtriya Janata Dal chief Lalu Prasad and his son Tejashwi Yadav in a case of corruption in the award of maintenance contracts of two Railway hotels to a Patna-based private company.The agency has asked Mr. Prasad to appear before the investigating team on Monday and his son the next day. The agency has registered a case against Mr. Prasad, his wife, Rabri Devi, and son under Sections 420 (cheating) and 120-B (criminal conspiracy) of the Indian Penal Code, read with provisions of the Prevention of Corruption Act. The Enforcement Directorate has summoned Ms. Devi for Tuesday for recording her statement under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act. It is alleged that during Mr. Prasad’s tenure as Railway Minister, contract conditions were changed to favour Sujata Hotels in awarding the maintenance contracts of Railway hotels in Ranchi and Puri, in lieu of about three acres of commercial property in Patna.last_img read more

Maria Sharapova storms into 3rd consecutive French Open final

first_imgMaria Sharapova defeated Eugenie Bouchard 4-6, 7-5, 6-2 in the semis on ThursdayMaria Sharapova made it back into the French Open final for the third straight year, beating Eugenie Bouchard of Canada 4-6, 7-5, 6-2 Thursday.The seventh-seeded Russian lost the first set for the third straight match, but again managed to turn things around. Sharapova won eight of the last 10 games, and has now won 19 straight three-set matches on clay.Sharapova completed a career Grand Slam by winning the title at Roland Garros in 2012, but lost to Serena Williams in last year’s final.Bouchard, a 20-year-old Canadian seeded 18th at Roland Garros, was playing at the French Open for the only second time. Last year, she lost to Sharapova in the second round.In the other semifinal match, fourth-seeded Simona Halep of Romania will face 28th-seeded Andrea Petkovic of Germany.The final is on Saturday.Sharapova struggled a bit with her serve, double-faulting nine times and getting broken four times. But she made up for her shaky serving with solid groundstrokes, either going for winners or waiting out errors from Bouchard.Bouchard took the early lead with her first break in the third game of the match, smacking a forehand winner to give herself a 2-1 edge. She quickly made it 3-1 by completing a run of winning 12 of 17 points.The pair traded breaks early in the second set, and then again later. But Sharapova managed to stay ahead and broke Bouchard for the third time in the set to even the match at one set apiece.advertisementSharapova served first in the third set, and made her move in the fourth game, converting her third break point to take a 3-1 lead that she held onto until the end.Bouchard, who reached the Australian Open semifinals in January, saved four match points before Sharapova won it with a forehand that Bouchard missed on the other end.Sharapova won her first Grand Slam title 10 years ago at Wimbledon. She followed that with major titles at the U.S. Open in 2006 and the Australian Open in 2008. But since she recovered from having right shoulder surgery in 2008, she has vastly improved her clay-court game and has won six of her last eight titles on the red surface.This year, Sharapova has already won clay-court titles in Stuttgart and Rome, and her six wins so far at Roland Garros give her an 18-1 record on the dirt this season.And like against Bouchard, it’s been tough to beat her in three sets on the surface. The last time Sharapova lost a three-set match on clay was at Roland Garros in 2010, when Justine Henin beat her in the third round.last_img read more