Big total key to Windies’ chances – coach West

first_imgDAMBULLA, Sri Lanka (CMC):West Indies A made a stuttering start to the opening unofficial one-day international (ODI) against Sri Lanka A before rain intervened to end play prematurely at the Rangiri Dambulla International Stadium here yesterday.Opting to bat first, the Caribbean side had reached 69 for two in the 13th over, with opener Kyle Hope unbeaten on 28 and Andre Fletcher on seven. The game will be concluded on today’s reserve day.Head coach Graeme West rued the weather interruption and said West Indies A would need to find their momentum again on what was a good batting track, if they were to put Sri Lanka A under pressure.”We got ourselves into a good position with some positive batting, and we’ll certainly need more of the same tomorrow,” West said afterwards.”It looks a good wicket, (there’s) not much happening for the spinners and it’s pretty slow for the quicks, so we need to build around Kyle Hope and Andre Fletcher … and set something up for some of the positive players to come later on in the innings and try and post something that will put the Sri Lankans under pressure.”They’ve certainly got an experienced and powerful top six themselves so we’ll certainly need a big score to put them under pressure.”The right-handed Hope put on 40 for the first wicket with Chadwick Walton, who made 16 from 12 balls with two fours and a six, before falling in the sixth over.Hope, who has counted four boundaries in a 39-ball innings, then added a further 23 with left-hander Assad Fudadin, who scored 14 off 10 deliveries with two fours and a six, before perishing in the eighth over.The game is the first of a three-match series against the hosts, with Jason Mohammed leading the unit.West Indies A, under the leadership of Shamarh Brooks, suffered a 2-1 defeat in the three-match, four-day Test series, which ended last week.last_img read more

Image issues hound start of Alaska’s Iditarod sled dog race

first_imgBut PETA has also increased its pressure on Iditarod sponsors, targeting them with mass email campaigns. Given the Iditarod’s strong name recognition outside Alaska, even the perception of animal mistreatment could be a “big brand hit,” according to branding expert Bob Dorfman of Baker Street Advertising in San Francisco.Pressure from a prominent organization like PETA could make sponsors think twice, according to Dorfman.“If they have a legitimate case, it’s going to be very difficult to say, ‘OK, I’m backing this,’ because in a sense, you’re backing cruelty to animals,” he said.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra LATEST STORIES Kawhi Leonard hits winner, Raptors beat Trail Blazers FILE – In this March 3, 2018, file photo, Eagle River, Alaska musher Tom Schonberger’s lead dogs trot along Fourth Avenue during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Anchorage, Alaska. The world’s foremost sled dog race kicks off its 47th running this weekend on Saturday, March 2, 2019, as organizers and competitors strive to push past a punishing two years for the image of the sport. Some of the drama has been resolved for Alaska’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race. (AP Photo/Michael Dinneen, File)ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The world’s foremost sled dog race kicks off its 47th running this weekend as participants strive to push past a punishing two years for the sport’s image.Some of the drama has been resolved for Alaska’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. In December, race organizers cleared four-time winner Dallas Seavey of any wrongdoing in a 2017 dog-doping scandal. New members also have been appointed to the Iditarod’s governing board following musher discontent over perceived conflicts.ADVERTISEMENT Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award In December, Hooley said he was leaving after 25 years with the Iditarod to take on a new opportunity outside the state, but added he was not at liberty to say what it was. He said his departure had nothing to do with the Iditarod coming off a difficult time.Earlier pressure from activists led to the sport addressing “past imperfections,” said four-time champion Jeff King.“The last couple years have been very trying for many,” he said. “But in the end, I think there will be good that comes out of it.”The Iditarod begins Saturday with a short ceremonial run in Anchorage, the state’s largest city. The real race to the old Gold Rush town of Nome starts Sunday in Willow, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) to the north.The 52-team field — the smallest in more than two decades — includes defending champion Joar Ulsom, of Norway, along with King and two other four-time winners and a three-time champion. St. George said he doesn’t believe the number of competitors is indicative of any trend. But the economy could play a role because of the big expense involved in mushing, and St. George said some mushers have retired or are taking time off or racing elsewhere.ADVERTISEMENT But animal activists are turning up the heat over multiple dog deaths in the history of the 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) race, which spans mountain ranges, the frozen Yukon River and dangerous sea ice along the Bering Sea coast, with village checkpoints staged across the trail. Big-name sponsors continue to drop their support, and have been replaced by smaller, Alaska-based backers. And organizers still grapple with budget strains manifested in a purse far below the prizes offered in the recent past.The expected top prize is $50,000, the same amount as last year, but more than $20,000 below the 2017 prize. The total purse is again $500,000 — about $250,000 below the 2017 purse. The prize money comes from sponsors and other sources, including fundraisers, special promotions and the Iditarod Insider, a paid online subscription that provides race coverage.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsThe Iditarod has survived similar pressures, said Chas St. George, acting CEO of the Iditarod Trail Committee.“We have a bright future as long as we stay committed to and focused on what’s in the best interest of the sled dogs and in the best interest of the communities that are part of this race, that step up every year to make this happen,” said St. George, who is filling in at the helm while the board seeks a replacement for longtime CEO Stan Hooley, who departed in January. That is the case with Seavey, who has adamantly denied giving the opioid painkiller tramadol to his dogs during the 2017 Iditarod.Seavey skipped last year’s race in protest, competing instead in Norway’s Finnmarkslopet race. He said he’s going back to this year’s Finnmarkslopet, which starts about a week after the Iditarod, because of unfinished business after placing third last year.People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, a longtime Iditarod critic, plans to protest at both starting points. By PETA’s count, more than 150 dogs have died in the race, including one last year. Five dogs connected with the 2017 race also died.The total number of deaths is disputed by race officials, who cannot provide their own count because they say no records of dog deaths were kept in the Iditarod’s early years. St. George didn’t immediately respond to a request Friday morning for the number of dog deaths they have counted.For this year’s race, PETA posted ads on Anchorage public buses that say, “Iditarod: Chained, suffering and dying dogs. End the race.” PETA maintains the dogs are forced to run and are subjected to cruel conditions that leave them with bloody paws, stress fractures and other injuries.“This race is an annual tragedy. It’s nothing more than organized animal abuse,” PETA spokeswoman Colleen O’Brien said in an email to The Associated Press.Mushers and race officials say great strides have been made in animal care, thanks largely to the Iditarod, the mushers themselves and an army of veterinarians stationed at every checkpoint along the trail.This year’s race, for example, incorporates a new rule that requires mushers be automatically be removed from the race if a dog dies, unless the death is caused by an unpreventable hazard like a moose encounter.The lifestyle of keeping and training sled dogs year-round actually enhances the animals’ lives, contrary to critics’ claims, said veteran musher Matthew Failor, who is running his eighth Iditarod.“You’re never going to get rid of PETA,” he said. “Those are extremists, just like dog mushers are extremists. We love our dogs as much as they don’t want dogs to pull you around.” Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California collegecenter_img Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history View comments MOST READ Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazillast_img read more