Edwards brothers embrace sibling connection in pool

first_imgBlake wants to cruise in an RV across Australia. Lachlan thinks the idea is dreadful. Lachlan loves listening to Taylor Swift. Blake thinks she’s awful. The Edwards brothers are two of USC’s top aquatic athletes. But though they share a love for the sport and for each other, they couldn’t be more different.Blake is a 23-year-old junior transfer from Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. Lachlan is a 20-year-old sophomore who was recruited by USC straight out of high school and spent last year playing for the Trojans.The two have spent many years playing water polo together. They grew up by the pool, as their mother and father represented Australia in swimming and water polo, respectively.Blake started playing water polo as a 12 year old, when his older brothers began their careers, and Lachlan started at the same time as an 8-year-old. The two are the third and fifth brothers in a family of aquatic athletes.Five of the brothers started for the same Melbourne Collegians club team in what was a season unlike anything most athletes or siblings could ever hope to experience.“For me, it was one of my most memorable water polo experiences — that camaraderie  that we developed from knowing each other,” Blake said. “It was just a really rewarding experience to be out there and to share something with your brothers.”Both brothers are members of the Australian National Team, so they have been able to travel to many places in Asia and Eastern Europe.  However, one place water polo had never taken the Edwards’ before USC was the United States.Their perception of America was taken straight from Hollywood. Blake confessed he loved watching the TV show The O.C.“My dream is to have a girl on the back of my bike, riding on the boardwalk,” he said.Not only are the two countries’ cultures different, but both brothers also acknowledged that the transition from Australian universities was very challenging because the student body is much more disengaged and the learning more theoretical on their home continent.“I find that the way it’s set up here with everyone on campus sets up more opportunities to network and meet people,” Blake said.  “The learning is much more engaging and enjoyable.”Though the brothers are good at coexisting in the pool, they aren’t so used to being forced to do so outside of it.  Currently, Blake and Lachlan are sharing a room, something they haven’t had to do since before they were five.“We fought a lot more back home. Usually he is the grumpiest man back home, and I’m always annoying him … now that we’re in the same room, he hasn’t really got a choice,” Blake said.  “We’re still in the honeymoon stage.”Even the honeymoon stage of a relationship has its tense points, though.  Blake described a wrong turn he made in L.A. that gave him an eye-opening look at some of the more interesting parts of Los Angeles.  Lachlan shook his head and expressed how happy he was that he missed out on that quasi-adventure.And though the brothers share a room, they do not share a taste in music.“You listen to all crap, like all ’80s stuff,” Lachlan said to Blake. “There’s a time and a place for that, and he cannot pick when that should be played.”Blake responded disapprovingly by telling his brother that he listens to a lot of teenage girl music.“It’s the best stuff,” Lachlan replied.When their time at USC comes to a close and the brothers are back down under, both would like to spend time seeing more of Australia, however Blake’s desired surfing road trip in an RV isn’t for everyone.“That’s where we’re the opposite,” Lachlan said.  “It’d be good to see that stuff, but a year in a truck with him, I don’t know about that.”In the meantime, the brothers said their biggest goal is to win a national championship for USC, something they said their connection might help them to do.“I seem to find him a lot easier,” Blake said. “I don’t know if it’s because of the size of him but that’s the way it’s always happened.  I understand him and his abilities a lot more, and he understands mine as well.”The brothers will continue their water polo career together, both in and out of the pool.  They will look to lead USC to another national title, something they say shouldn’t be too hard.“There’s no one closer than your family, so when I’m successful and able to share it with him, it’s something I can’t describe,” Lachlan said. “Seeing him be successful and play well, you get the same feeling if it was you doing it.”last_img read more

Ed Elsass, 50, Wellington: June 25, 1963 – June 2, 2014

first_imgEd Elsass, of Wellington, died on Monday, June 2, 2014 at his home in Wellington at the age of 50.Ed ElsassEd was born the son of Stew and Nancee (McGee) Elsass on Tuesday, June 25, 1963 in Wichita. His mother preceded him in death.On Friday, August 30, 1985, Ed and Carol (Lawless) were united in marriage in Mulvane. Together they celebrated 28 years of marriage.Ed was a corrections officer for the Sumner County Detention Center in Wellington. Survivors include his wife, Carol Elsass of Wellington; daughter, Shanonn Sharpe and her husband Tyler of Yukon, Oklahoma; son, Benjaminn Elsass and his wife Jeanette of Wellington; father and stepmother, Stew and Marilyn Elsass of Springfield, Missouri; sister, Susann Elsass of Florence, Alabama; stepsisters, Cathy DiFilippo and her husband Tony of Nixa, Missouri and Sarah Truitt of Springfield, Missouri.Memorial services for Ed will be held at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, June 7, 2014 at the Church of Christ in Wellington.Memorials have been established in his loving memory to the Ed Elsass Memorial Fund, American Heart Association and the American Cancer Society. Contributions may be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

Cilia appears to play key role in formation of melanoma

first_img Source:http://www.media.uzh.ch/en/Press-Releases/2018/Melanoma.html Jul 2 2018Most cells in the human body have a cilium, a slender cell protuberance that picks up signals from the cell’s external environment. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown that these fine sensory antennae play a key role in the formation of melanoma. When cilia are prevented from developing in benign pigment cells, the cells degenerate and develop an aggressive form of melanoma.Melanomas are one of the most aggressive types of tumors in humans. Despite remarkable success with new forms of treatment such as immunotherapies, there are still many melanoma patients who cannot be cured or who later suffer a recurrence of the disease following successful treatment. An in-depth understanding of the tumor’s biology is thus essential for developing novel therapeutic approaches. The main question is which changes in a benign cell cause it to progress into a malignant tumor.Related StoriesNew clinical genomic testing helps identify mutations that drive childhood melanomaPhysicians trained in dermatoscopy can improve odds for early detection of melanomaResearchers find possible counterpunch to drug resistance of melanomaFormation and spread of melanoma also regulated epigeneticallyA team of researchers led by Lukas Sommer, professor at the Institute of Anatomy at the University of Zurich (UZH), has now been able to show that in addition to genetic causes such as mutations in the DNA, epigenetic factors also play a role in the formation and spread of melanoma. While epigenetic factors don’t directly influence the gene sequence, they do regulate how efficiently certain genes are transcribed in the cells. The UZH researchers focused on the EZH2 protein, which – unlike in benign cells – is very common in melanoma cells and plays a central role in melanoma formation.EZH2 suppresses ciliary genes and leads to metastasisTo find out how epigenetic factors contribute to the melanoma’s aggressive behavior, the scientists examined all the genes that are regulated by EZH2. “We were very surprised to find many genes that are jointly responsible for the formation of cilia,” says study leader Sommer. It seems that cilia genes are suppressed by EZH2, which means that malignant melanoma cells have much fewer of these fine sensory hairs than the skin’s benign pigment cells. With the help of human melanoma cells and mouse models, the researchers succeeded in demonstrating that loss of cilia in pigment cells activates carcinogenic signaling pathways, ultimately resulting in the formation of aggressive, metastatic melanoma.Approach for novel tumor therapiesThere are many types of cancers composed of cells that have lost their cilia. “The epigenetic regulation of cilia formation that we’ve now discovered in melanoma is, therefore, likely also relevant for the formation of other types of cancers, such as breast or brain tumors,” remarks Lukas Sommer. Drugs that block EZH2 probably offer a promising strategy when it comes to treating melanoma, possibly in combination with immunotherapies, according to Sommer.last_img read more