Fivestar Athletics facing stiff penalties; tips for entering contracts

first_imgAll fitness contracts have to be in writing and they have to contain certain information, as outlined by B.C. law.For more tips and information about B.C.’s fitness contract law, visit www.consumerprotectionbc.ca. Consumers can cancel their fitness contract within 10 days of signing, no matter what. (Also, consumers must receive their refund within 15 days of cancelling). The investigation into Fivestar Athletics began after Consumer Protection B.C. received a complaint that customers were being illegally entered into verbal contacts and denied cancellation rights.“Contracts required by martial arts studios and gyms are called continuing service contracts and this business sector needs to know there are serious consequences for breaking the law,” spokesperson for Consumer Protection B.C., Tatiana Chabeaux-Smith said in a written response. “The bottom line is that verbal contracts are not allowed and cancellation rights must be honoured.”The facility is now being ordered to meet a number of requirements under the Compliance Order and Administrative Penalty, including the reimbursement of $1,560 to a consumer, the payment of penalities totalling $2,300, and the reimbursement of $500 to Consumer Protection B.C. for partial inspection cost.- Advertisement -Fivestar Athletics must also immediately comply with contract requirements under the Business Practices and Consumer Protection Act, as well as the Consumer Contracts Regulation.What you should know before entering a fitness contractConsumer Protection B.C. is offering the following advice for anyone considering a gym membership for the upcoming year:Advertisementcenter_img Consumers can cancel their fitness contract under certain circumstances (called “material changes”). For example, if the consumer moves more than 30 km away from the gym and comparable facilities aren’t available, they are allowed to cancel.last_img read more

This week’s college games

first_imgTODAY Volleyball Desert at San Bernardino Valley, 5 p.m.; Chaffey at Rio Hondo, 5 p.m.; Cerritos at Mt. SAC, 7 p.m.; Cypress at Riverside Community, 7 p.m. Men’s soccer Cal State at Cal State L.A., 4:30 p.m.; Occidental at Redlands, 4 p.m.; La Verne at CMS, 4 p.m.; Pomona-Pitzer at Caltech, 4 p.m. Women’s soccer Cal State at Cal State L.A., 7 p.m.; Redlands at Occidental, 4 p.m.; La Verne at CMS, 4 p.m. Women’s water polo Citrus at Canyons, 3:30 p.m. center_img Men’s water polo Riverside Community at Cypress, 4 p.m. Men’s golf Mt. SAC at Long Beach (at El Dorado), noon. Wrestling Mt. SAC at Santa Ana, 7 p.m.; Victor Valley at Palomar Duals, 7 p.m. THURSDAY Volleyball La Verne at Azusa Pacific, 7 p.m. Men’s water polo Orange Coast at Mt. SAC, 3 p.m.; Riverside Community at Cal Baptist, 3 p.m. FRIDAY Volleyball Cal Poly Pomona at CS Stanislaus, 7 p.m.; Simpson (Iowa) at La Verne, 7 p.m.; Swarthmore at CMS, 3 p.m.; Swarthmore at Pomona-Pitzer, 7 p.m.; UC Riverside at UC Irvine, 7 p.m.; San Bernardino Valley at Chaffey, 5 p.m.; Rio Hondo at Victor Valley, 5 p.m.; Citrus at Cuesta, 7 p.m.; Mt. SAC at Long Beach, 6 p.m.; Riverside Community at Irvine Valley, 6 p.m. Men’s soccer Cal Poly Pomona at Sonoma State, 1 p.m.; Cal State at CS Stanislaus, 4:30 p.m.; San Bernardino Valley at Chaffey, 4 p.m.; Mission at Citrus, 2 p.m.; Mt. SAC at East L.A. 4 p.m.; Golden West at Riverside Community, 3 p.m.; CS Fullerton at UC Riverside, 3 p.m. Women’s soccer Cal Poly Pomona at Sonoma St., 3:30 p.m.; Cal State at CS Stanislaus, 1:30 p.m.; UC Riverside at UC Santa Barbara, 7 p.m.; Victor Valley at San Bernardino Valley, 3 p.m.; Chaffey at Desert, 3 p.m.; Glendale at Citrus, 4 p.m.; Mt. SAC at East L.A., 6 p.m.; Riverside Community at Orange Coast, 1 p.m. Cross country Mt. SAC Invitational, 1 p.m.; SCIAC Multi-Dual Meet (at La Mirada), 4 p.m. Men’s water polo Citrus at Cuesta Tournament Women’s water polo Mt. SAC at American River Tournament SATURDAY Football Whittier at Redlands, 7 p.m.; Cal Lutheran at La Verne, 1 p.m.; Pomona-Pitzer at CMS, 1 p.m.; Mt. San Jacinto at San Bernardino Valley, 1 p.m.; San Diego Mesa at Chaffey, 5 p.m.; Victor Valley at Southwestern, 1 p.m.; Canyons at Citrus (at Azusa Pacific), noon; Mt. SAC at Long Beach, 5 p.m.; Palomar at Riverside Community, 5 p.m. Volleyball Cal Poly Pomona at Chico St., 7 p.m.; Cal State at UC San Diego, 7 p.m.; Redlands Mini-Tournament – Simpson vs. Redlands, 2:30 p.m.; Simpson vs. La Sierra, 7:30 p.m.; UC Santa Cruz at CMS, 7:30 p.m.; Chapman at Pomona-Pitzer, 7:30 p.m.; UC Riverside at Long Beach St., 7 p.m. Men’s soccer Redlands at Pomona-Pitzer, 11 a.m.; Caltech at La Verne, 4 p.m.; Whittier at CMS, 11 a.m. Women’s soccer Pomona-Pitzer at Redlands, 11 a.m.; CS East Bay at La Verne, 7 p.m.; CMS at Whittier, 11 a.m. Cross country Triton Invitational (At La Jolla), 10 a.m., includes Cal Poly Pomona; San Bernardino Valley, Citrus at Santa Barbara, 10 a.m. Men’s water polo CMS at Redlands, 11 a.m.; La Verne at Cal Lutheran, 1 p.m.; Citrus at Cuesta Tournament. Women’s water polo Citrus Tournament; Mt. SAC at American River Tournament Wrestling West Valley Tournament (in cludes Mt. SAC), all day. SUNDAY Men’s soccer Cal Poly Pomona at San Francis co St., 12:30 p.m.; Cal State at Chico St., 3 p.m.; Cal Poly San Luis Obispo at UC Riverside, 3 p.m. Women’s soccer Cal Poly Pomona at San Francis co St., 3 p.m.; Cal State at Chico St., 12:30 p.m.; UC Riverside at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, 1 p.m. Women’s water polo Citrus Tournament MONDAY Women’s soccer Wheaton (Ill.) at Redlands, 4 p.m. Women’s golf Citrus vs. Moorpark, 11 a.m.; Foothill Conference Tourna ment (at El Dorado), 11 a.m. TUESDAY Volleyball Caltech at Redlands, 7:30 p.m.; CMS at La Verne, 7:30 p.m.; Cal Lutheran at Pomona-Pitzer, 7:30 p.m.; Citrus at Santa Monica, 7 p.m. Men’s soccer Webster (Mo.) at Redlands, 4 p.m.; Desert at San Bernardino Valley, 3 p.m.; Citrus at Santa Barbara, 4 p.m.; Mt. SAC at Pasadena City, 1 p.m.; Riverside Community at Orange Coast, 3 p.m.; Rio Hondo at Victor Val ley, 3 p.m. Women’s soccer San Bernardino Valley at Chaf fey, 3 p.m.; Citrus at Santa Mon ica, 4 p.m.; Mt. SAC at Pasadena City, 3 p.m.; Santa Ana at River side Community, 3 p.m.; Mt. San Jacinto at Victor Valley, 3 p.m. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

‘It became a religion to me’: With the Yankees in town, Ramon Laureano reflects on the team that inspired him to play baseball

first_imgRamon Laureano’s love for baseball didn’t start outside on the diamond. There were no childhood indications that his laser arm could be unearthed, his killer competitive instinct didn’t necessarily manifest from innocuous childhood games with teammates or friends.Laureano’s love of baseball blossomed during hot summer nights in Santo Domingo. In front of the television with his family, a 7-year-old Laureano would fixate on the day’s Yankees game.As frustrating the media bias for the classic …last_img

Molecular Motors Do Ballet

first_imgScientists at University of Illinois studied dynein and kinesin – the tiny molecular trucks that ferry cargo inside the living cell – and found that they are not just individualists: they cooperate in a delicate yet effective performance.    Some scientists had thought that the two machine types, which travel in opposite directions, were involved in a constant tug-o’war with each other.  Instead, reports the university’s news bureau, “The motors cooperate in a delicate choreography of steps.”    Using high-speed imaging techniques, they determined that “multiple motors can work in concert, producing more than 10 times the speed of individual motors measured outside the cell.”  The machines move by “walking” on rails called microtubules in steps 8 billionths of a meter at a time.  The team is measuring the force produced by the motion to “further understand these marvelous little machines.”  There was no mention of evolution in the report.Someone should put an animation of these machines to the Blue Danube Waltz.  It would be quite a show.  Darwinists could be allowed to buy tickets as long as they do their smoking outside.(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa’s commercial radio stations

first_imgA guide to South Africa’s commercial radio stations, which includes what each offers, what frequency to tune into and where the broadcasting areas are.South Africa’s commercial radio stations include Metro FM, Jacaranda FM and Kaya FM. (Image: Jacaranda FM, Facebook)Brand South Africa reporterUnder apartheid, South Africa had only two independent radio stations. With the deregulation of broadcasting in the late 1990s, the number of commercial stations operating outside of state control proliferated.In 1996 six lucrative SABC stations were privatised: Gauteng’s 947 and Radio Jacaranda, KwaZulu-Natal’s East Coast Radio, the Western Cape’s KFM 94.5, the Eastern Cape’s Radio Algoa and the Free State’s OFM. The government raised over R500-million as the stations were licensed to various black-controlled groups.In early 1997 eight new commercial radio licences were granted for broadcasting in South Africa’s three biggest cities – Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban.Applicants targeting black audiences with new formats were generally favoured, with two “smooth jazz” licences, Heart 104.9 in Cape Town and Igagasi 99.5 in Durban; one urban youth station, YFM; and one urban contemporary station, Kaya FM. The remaining four licences went to an English-language talk station, CapeTalk 567; two Afrikaans talk stations, Punt in Cape Town and Durban; and a classical music station, Classic FM.Metro FMBroadcast in English, Metro FM is the largest national commercial station in South Africa, targeting 25- to 34-year-old black urban adults – who its owner the SABC describes as “trendy, innovative, progressive and aspirational”. While the station does have some information and educational aspects, the focus is firmly on contemporary international music – hip-hop, R&B, kwaito and more.Frequency: 96.4 FMMetro FM websiteBroadcast area: Metropolitan areas of Gauteng, Limpopo, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape, Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 5.26-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioJacaranda FMOne of the largest independent commercial stations and also broadcasting in Gauteng, Jacaranda offers a mix of more easy-listening adult contemporary music and news.Frequency: 94.2 FMJacaranda FM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 2.32-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioEast Coast RadioEast Coast broadcasts a mix of music and news to Durban and throughout KwaZulu-Natal.Frequency: 94 to 95 FMEast Coast radio websiteBroadcast area: KwaZulu-NatalAudience (past seven days): 2.06-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioYfmHome of Kwaito and the “Y Generation”, Y is the country’s most popular youth station. Yfm has a self-imposed 50% local music quota – more than any other radio station in the country. It works in partnership with New York-based Masters At Work, who have released SA artists into the US and Europe as part of YFM’s ongoing commitment to South African music and culture.Frequency: 99.2 FMYFM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 1.34-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audio5FMThe SABC’s trendy youth-oriented station, 5FM’s emphasis is on the latest music, movies and South African youth trends. Broadcasting in English to South Africa’s metropolitan areas, its music styles are international, and include a strong component of South African artists of world standard.Frequency: see the 5FM frequency finder5FM websiteBroadcast area: Metropolitan areas of Gauteng, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 1.32-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audio947 (previously known as 94.7 Highveld Stereo)Popular home of Anele’s Breakfast Club, 947 broadcasts a mix of contemporary music that connects with Joburg. It is owned by Primedia Broadcasting.Frequency: 94.7 FM947 websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 1.18-millionLanguage: EnglishOwned by: PrimediaKaya FMKaya FM provides an African-focused adult contemporary and jazz format, with a mix of music and talk. One of the country’s newest radio stations, Kaya broadcasts throughout Gauteng.Frequency: 95.9 FMKaya FM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 932 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioGood Hope FMCape Town’s largest radio station, the SABC’s Good Hope FM plays contemporary music ranging from R&B, ballads and pop through to hip hop, dance, jazz and old school. With a broadcast footprint covering metropolitan Cape Town, Langebaan, Malmesbury, Wellington, Paarl, Franchhoek, Stellenbosch and Gordon’s Bay, it targets the 22- to 32-year-old age group.Frequency: 93.9 to 96.7 FMGood Hope FM websiteBroadcast area: Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 620 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioAlgoa FMAlgoa FM’s music and news is broadcast to the entire Eastern Cape region.Frequency: 94 to 96.7 FMAlgoa FM websiteBroadcast area: Eastern CapeAudience (past seven days): 448 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audio702702 is Gauteng’s number-one current affairs and information station, offering news, sport, business and actuality programming – and lots of phone-in debate. Established in 1980, it was initially a youth music station, moving to the more adult talk format in 1988. During the apartheid era it was one of the only independent sources of broadcast news. The station is owned by Primedia.Frequency: 92.7 FM702 websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 281 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioCapeTalk 567Broadcasting on Medium Wave 567, CapeTalk is Cape Town’s first talk radio station. CapeTalk promises to bring you all the news, views, sport, weather, traffic and information you need. It is owned by Primedia.Frequency: 567 AM (MW)CapeTalk 567 websiteBroadcast area: Western CapeAudience (past seven days): 82 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioClassic FMBased on the UK station, Classic FM has been broadcasting classical music throughout Gauteng since September 1997. Through their partnership with Business Day, the station offers in-depth business coverage each week night from 6pm. There are also lifestyle features, news, financial updates, sport, and interviews with local artists and composers.Frequency: 102.7 FMClassic FM websiteBroadcast area: GautengAudience (past seven days): 151 000Language: EnglishOffers live internet audioKfm 94.5With the tagline “The most music. Feel Great”, Kfm 94.5 broadcasts adult contemporary music in the Western Cape and as far afield as Alexander Bay and the Northern Cape. It is owned by Primedia.Frequency: 94.5 FMKfm 94.5 websiteBroadcast area: Western Cape, Northern CapeAudience (past seven days): 1.29-millionLanguage: EnglishOffers live internet audioOFMThe commercial regional station of the Free State (a province with the name Orange Free State before 1994, hence the O), OFM broadcasts adult contemporary music.Frequency: 94 to 97 FMOFM websiteBroadcast area: Free StateAudience (past seven days): 436 000Language: English and AfrikaansOffers live internet audioRadio 2000To the listener, Radio 2000 is a laid back and non-intrusive radio station. Radio 2000, being a facility station, relies heavily on sports broadcasts. The result is that its listenership fluctuates, since it is often based on national and international sports events.Frequency: 97.2 to 100.2 FMRadio 2000 websiteBroadcast area: All provinces, except the Northern CapeAudience (past seven days): 151 000Language: EnglishChannel AfricaThe international radio service of the SABC offers a multilingual source of information on Africa – with news, music and sports. Broadcasts are in Chinyanja, Silozi, Kiswahili, English, French and Portuguese, with shortwave broadcasts covering south, east, central and west Africa, satellite broadcasts covering the sub-Saharan region – and internet broadcasts covering the entire world.Frequency: see the Channel Africa frequency guideChannel Africa websiteBroadcast area: south, east, central and west Africa (shortwave)Language: English, Chinyanja, Silozi, Kiswahili, French and PortugueseOffers live internet audioUseful linksAnt RadioBroadcasting Complaints Commission of South AfricaDepartment of CommunicationsFreedom of Expression InstituteInstitute for the Advancement of JournalismWits JournalismMedia Development and Diversity AgencyMedia Institute of Southern AfricaNational Association of BroadcastersNational Community Radio ForumPrimediaSouth African Audience Research FoundationSouth African Broadcasting CorporationSouth African National Editors ForumWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri wins TIFF Peoples Choice Award

first_imgThe people’s choice Midnight Madness Award went to Joseph Kahn’s “Bodied,” followed by first runner-up “The Disaster Artist” from James Franco, and second runner-up “Brawl in Cell Block 99” from director Craig Zahler. “Sir, it would be my privilege to sit down and have a beer with you someday.” First runner-up was “I, Tonya,” a mockumentary-style dark comedy starring Margot Robbie as disgraced U.S. figure skater Tonya Harding. The Craig Gillespie film explores Harding’s hardscrabble upbringing and ascension up the skating ranks, and looks at the infamous 1994 attack on American rival Nancy Kerrigan. The Martin McDonagh film about revenge and redemption in small-town America beat out several other buzzworthy titles for the Grolsch People’s Choice Award at a ceremony Sunday closing out the 11-day festival. The TIFF win comes on the heels of best screenplay honours for “Three Billboards” at the Venice Film Festival. The people’s choice documentary prize went to Agnes Varda and JR’s “Faces Places.” First runner-up was awarded to Tragically Hip documentary “Long Time Running” from Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier, with second runner-up prize going to Morgan Spurlock’s “Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!” Advertisement “It’s a story that connects with people. It’s really well-acted,” festival director Piers Handling said of “Three Billboards.” “It’s just told with humour and grit and rawness and doesn’t pull its punches.” Advertisement “I think it’s very important to talk about women’s issues all around the world because still we are facing gender discrimination,” Foroughi said. “I really wish to have equality soon.”By: Lauren La Rose “It’s not an easy film to watch; but as far as being Indigenous and an Indigenous filmmaker, it’s the truth,” said Thornton of “Sweet Country,” which set in 1929 in Australia’s Northern Territory. Last year’s winner was “La La Land,” which scored a record-tying 14 Oscar nominations. The Los Angeles-set musical starring London, Ont., native Ryan Gosling went on to win six Oscars, including best actress for Emma Stone and the director prize for Damien Chazelle. Oscar winner Frances McDormand is emerging as contender for another best actress statuette for her powerful turn as a grieving mother seeking vengeance after the rape and murder of her daughter. Her fight for justice arrives in the form of three large-scale signs targeted toward police chief William Willoughby (Woody Harrelson.) Second runner-up was Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name,” a heartbreaking love story and coming-of-age tale set in the Italian countryside. The film centres on 17-year-old Elio (Timothee Chalamet) who finds himself infatuated with an older student (Armie Hammer) working for his father. TIFF’s annual people’s choice prize, which includes a $15,000 cash award, is often regarded as a bellwether for success at the Academy Awards. Actor Frances McDormand is shown in a scene from the film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” The film won the People’s Choice prize at the Toronto International Film Festival on Sunday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-TIFF MANDATORY CREDITcenter_img The $15,000 City of Toronto Award for best Canadian first feature film went to Wayne Wapeemukwa for “Luk’ Luk’l.” The film is a hybrid documentary about five Vancouverites living on the fringes of society during the 2010 Winter Olympics. Facebook Iranian-born, Montreal-based filmmaker Sadaf Foroughi won the Discovery program prize for “Ava.” Her directorial debut centres on an Iranian teenage girl struggling between traditions and modernity, and also earned an honourable mention for best Canadian first feature film. “It’s the truth I needed to get out there not only about Australia, but to to the world, to say there’s an alternative history, an oral history that we have passed down; and we’re starting to use for celluloid to tell, and that’s really important for us,” he said. Advertisement In a historic gaffe, “La La Land” was mistakenly announced as the best picture winner at this year’s ceremony before the prize was awarded to “Moonlight.” The $30,000 Canada Goose Award for best Canadian feature film went to Robin Aubert’s zombie film “Les Affames.” Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment TORONTO — The signs could be pointing to award season accolades for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” after the dark comedy captured the People’s Choice prize at the Toronto International Film Festival. Aubert was unable to attend the awards, but paid homage to David Cronenberg in a written statement. He said he is “forever indebted” to the legendary filmmaker for proving “forward-thinking genre films can also be made in Canada.” Other winners included Warwick Thornton’s “Sweet Country,” which captured the $25,000 Toronto Platform Prize, the festival’s juried program that champions director’s cinema from around the world. Twitterlast_img read more

Slavery history still affects blacks half of practicing Christians say in survey

first_img News Share This! By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Tags400th anniversary Barna homepage featured slavery survey,You may also like News By their tweets you will know them: The Democrats’ continuing God gap August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Fifty percent of practicing Christians say the history of American slavery continues to significantly affect the African American community today, a Barna study shows.A slightly smaller percentage of the general population of U.S. adults surveyed (46%) agrees that, almost 400 years after slaves were brought to Jamestown, Va., there remains a “significant impact on the African American community.”A bit more than a quarter of both practicing Christians and the general population (28%) say our society has moved past the history of slavery.“Views of Ongoing Impact of History of Slavery.” Graphic courtesy of BarnaBarna, a nonpartisan for-profit research firm, defined practicing Christians as people who identified themselves as Christians who said they attended a worship service in the past month and said their faith is very important in their lives. The findings are included in a new report, “Where Do We Go from Here?”Sixteen percent of practicing Christians responded to the question about slavery by saying they were unsure, compared to 18% of Americans overall. Seven percent of practicing Christians said they had not considered the issue, compared to 9% of the general population.RELATED: History of slaves sold for Georgetown detailed in new genealogical websiteThe study also showed sharp differences in views across racial and generational lines. While 79% of black practicing Christians agree that slavery’s effects continue today, 42% of white practicing Christians share that view. Conversely, 34% of white practicing Christian say society has moved beyond the history of slavery, while 9% of black practicing Christians say they hold that view.Millennials, defined in the survey as those born from 1984 to 1998, were the group most likely to agree there are continuing effects of slavery, with 65% saying so. The findings for older groups with similar views were as follows: Generation X (born 1965 to 1983) — 55%; boomers (born 1946-1964) — 40%; Elders (born before 1946) — 41%.“Views of Ongoing Impact of History of Slavery, By Generation.” Graphic courtesy of BarnaBarna’s report included reflections from scholars and faith leaders about how Christians can move ahead in addressing racism.“Churches need to preach on racial issues and return to preach on them again and again,” said Mark E. Strong, a lead pastor of Life Change Church in Portland, Ore., in a statement in a summary of the report.“This is part of spiritual formation, and like other formation issues — prayer, discipleship, generosity — it demands emphasis and regular, strong teaching.”The study, conducted with The Reimagine Group, which produces resources aimed at improving churches, is based on online surveys of 1,007 U.S. adults and 1,502 practicing adult Christians. The surveys, conducted between April and August 2018, have a margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percentage points for the general population and plus or minus 2.3 percentage points for practicing Christians. Anti-extremism program won’t stop hate, say Muslims who’ve seen its flaws August 30, 2019 Opinion Share This! Share This! Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Lebanese town bans Muslims from buying, renting property Pete Buttigieg: Religious left is ‘stirring’ August 29, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Adelle M. Banks Adelle M. Banks, production editor and a national reporter, joined RNS in 1995. An award-winning journalist, she previously was the religion reporter at the Orlando Sentinel and a reporter at The Providence Journal and newspapers in the upstate New York communities of Syracuse and Binghamton.,Load Comments,Eclectic field could turn first Democratic debate into a faith forum Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

WhatsApp messages to be under scanner during poll period CEC

first_imgChief election commissioner VS Sampath on Thursday said any offensive material on social media during election period will be strictly dealt with.‘The chief secretary and the DGP were told to instruct the police stations to register complaints against obnoxious material on social media during election period,’ Sampath said at a press conference here.last_img

8 FarOut Jetsons Contraptions That Actually Exist Today

first_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Free The Jetsons, that candy-colored cartoon about a family living in the future, was actually a bit of a time traveler.It premiered in 1962 on ABC and was the network’s first show to ever be broadcast in color. But this new-age way of viewing a television show didn’t help The Jetsons, as it only lasted 24 episodes before being cancelled thanks to poor ratings. The production company Hanna-Barbera (the minds behind The Flintstones and Scooby-Doo) gave it another shot and revived it in the ’80s with new episodes that ran in syndication from 1985 to 1987. The cartoon wasn’t around for all that long compared to some of its contemporaries, but its impact is an enduring one. True, there are some aspects of it that are a bit dated — you don’t see a lot of parents naming their sons Elroy nowadays — but it was remarkably prescient about where technology was headed.From interactive newspapers to video chatting, here are some of the inventions from The Jetsons that are a part of our world today.1. Flying cars.Image credit: Jetsons / AeromobilGeorge Jetson’s flying car converted into a portable briefcase, which is arguably pretty cool. While the car improvements haven’t trended in that direction just yet, the team at Slovakian startup AeroMobil is hard at work on a car that can turn into an airplane and vice versa. At this year’s SXSW, co-founder and CEO Juraj Vaculik said that their invention could arrive in 2017.Read more: At SXSW: The Flying Car Could Come as Early as 20172. Jetpacks. Image credit: Jetsons / AquaxflyerThere were jetpacks a plenty in the Jetsons universe, to get people everywhere from school to the dry cleaners. And while they aren’t available for general consumption just yet, startups like AquaFlyer, Martin JetPack and Jet Pack International are working towards that dream of commuting via jetpack a reality.Read more: The Man Making Jet Packs Possible3. Robotic help. Image credit: Jetsons / A.L.O. the BotlrThe Jetsons irascible housekeeper Rosie would feel right at home with the robotic butlers and concierge’s employed at the Henn-na Hotel in Japan and Aloft Hotel in California.Read more: This Robotic Butler Could Make Your Next Hotel Stay…Interesting4. Holograms. Image credit: Jetsons / PulseWhile in recent years, hologram versions of entertainers like Michael Jackson and Tupac Shakur have appeared at the Billboard Music Awards and Coachella, the “performances” yielded a fair few legal implications – so not quite the blithe holographic tree that the Jetsons family used to ring in the holiday season but fascinating nonetheless.Read more: Smoke and Mirrors: Why We Aren’t Seeing More Digital Zombies Like Michael JacksonRelated: 7 Business Lessons for Entrepreneurs From ‘Parks and Recreation’5. 3-D printed food.Image credit: Jetsons / ChefJetThe Jetsons family had a home food replicator that could churn out anything from asparagus to stroganoff. Now companies like Foodini and CojoJet are making it possible to create delicious 3-D printed entrees and desserts.Read more: From Eye Shadow to Entire Houses: 7 of the Craziest 3-D Printed Creations Yet 6. Drones. Image credit: Jetsons / Stephen WarrenerIn that classic intro, the Jetsons kids get delivered to school via flying pods. Though they aren’t dropping off people in their preferred locations yet, drones are being implemented to deliver packages, and taking aerial footage for industries as varied as movie making and real estate.Read more: Star Wars + Drones = Dreams Come True 7. Smart shoes. Image credit: Jetsons / Lesia TrubatAt one point during the ’80s run of episodes, George Jetson is saddled with a pair of shoes that have a mind of their own. Spanish designer Lesia Trubat González came up with the idea for E-Traces, ballet shoes outfitted with sensors that record dancers movements onto an app to then help them improve and teach others.Read more: These ‘Smart’ Ballet Shoes Digitally Paint Dancers’ Fancy Footwork 8. Smartwatches. Image credit: Jetsons / AppleWhat was a simple accessory for quick and easy calling and video chatting in the Jetsons universe has made some waves lately with all manner of tech companies trying to get in on the smartwatch market. Apple launched the Apple Watch amid much fanfare in April and Pebble’s latest product made for the most funded Kickstarter campaign ever, taking in more than $20 million from the company’s loyal customers.Read more: The One Reason You Should Want to Buy a SmartwatchRelated: 7 Business Lessons From Ross, Rachel and the Rest of the ‘Friends’ Crew April 17, 2015center_img 4 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.last_img read more

Why does the C programming language refuse to die

first_imgAs a technology research analyst, I try to keep up the pace with the changing world of technology. It seems like every single day, there is a new programming language, framework, or tool emerging out of nowhere. In order to keep up, I regularly have a peek at the listicles on TIOBE, PyPL, and Stackoverflow along with some twitter handles and popular blogs, which keeps my FOMO (fear of missing out) in check. So here I was, strolling through the TIOBE index, to see if a new programming language is making the rounds or if any old timer language is facing its doomsday in the lower half of the table. The first thing that caught my attention was Python, which interestingly broke into the top 3 for the first time since it was ranked by TIOBE. I never cared to look at Java, since it has been claiming the throne ever since it became popular. But with my pupils dilated, I saw something which I would have never expected, especially with the likes of Python, C#, Swift, and JavaScript around. There it was, the language which everyone seemed to have forgotten about, C, sitting at the second position, like an old tower among the modern skyscrapers in New York. A quick scroll down shocked me even more: C was only recently named the language of 2017 by TIOBE. The reason it won was because of its impressive yearly growth of 1.69% and its consistency – C has been featured in the top 3 list for almost four decades now. This result was in stark contrast to many news sources (including Packt’s own research) that regularly place languages like Python and JavaScript on top of their polls. But surely this was an indicator of something. Why would a language which is almost 50 years old still hold its ground against the ranks of newer programming language? C has a design philosophy for the ages A solution to the challenges of UNIX and Assembly The 70s was a historic decade for computing. Many notable inventions and developments, particularly in the area of networking, programming, and file systems, took place. UNIX was one such revolutionary milestone, but the biggest problem with UNIX was that it was programmed in Assembly language. Assembly was fine for machines, but difficult for humans. Watch now: Learn and Master C Programming For Absolute Beginners So, the team working on UNIX, namely Dennis Ritchie, Ken Thompson, and Brian Kernighan decided to develop a language which could understand data types and supported data structures. They wanted C to be as fast as the Assembly but with the features of a high-level language. And that’s how C came into existence, almost out of necessity. But the principles on which the C programming language was built were not coincidental. It compelled the programmers to write better code and strive for efficiency rather than being productive by providing a lot of abstractions. Let’s discuss some features which makes C a language to behold. Portability leads to true ubiquity When you try to search for the biggest feature of C, almost instantly, you are bombarded with articles on portability. Which makes you wonder what is it about portability that makes C relevant in the modern world of computing. Well, portability can be defined as the measure of how easily software can be transferred from one computer environment or architecture to another. One can also argue that portability is directly proportional to how flexible your software is. Applications or software developed using C are considered to be extremely flexible because you can find a C compiler for almost every possible platform available today. So if you develop your application by simply exercising some discipline to write portable code, you have yourself an application which virtually runs on every major platform. Programmer-driven memory management It is universally accepted that C is a high-performance language. The primary reason for this is that it works very close to the machine, almost like an Assembly language. But very few people realize that versatile features like explicit memory management makes C one of the better-performing languages out there. Memory management allows programmers to scale down a program to run with a small amount of memory. This feature was important in the early days because the computers or terminals as they used to call it, were not as powerful as they are today. But the advent of mobile devices and embedded systems has renewed the interest of programmers in C language because these mobile devices demand that the programmers keep memory requirement to a minimum. Many of the programming languages today provide functionalities like garbage collection that takes care of the memory allocation. But C calls programmers’ bluff by asking them to be very specific. This makes their programs and its memory efficient and inherently fast. Manual memory management makes C one of the most suitable languages for developing other programming languages. This is because even in a garbage collector someone has to take care of memory allocation – that infrastructure is provided by C. Structure is all I got As discussed before, Assembly was difficult to work with, particularly when dealing with large chunks of code. C has a structured approach in its design which allows the programmers to break down the program into multiple blocks of code for execution, often called as procedures or functions. There are, of course, multiple ways in which software development can be approached. Structural programming is one such approach that is effective when you need to break down a problem into its component pieces and then convert it into application code. Although it might not be quite as in vogue as object-oriented programming is today, this approach is well suited to tasks like database scripting or developing small programs with logical sequences to carry out specific set of tasks. As one of the best languages for structural programming, it’s easy to see how C has remained popular, especially in the context of embedded systems and kernel development. Applications that stand the test of time If Beyoncé would have been a programmer, she definitely might have sang “Who runs the world? C developers”. And she would have been right. If you’re using a digital alarm clock, a microwave, or a car with anti-lock brakes, chances are that they have been programmed using C. Though it was never developed specifically for embedded systems, C has become the defacto programming language for embedded developers, systems programmers, and kernel development. C: the backbone of our operating systems We already know that the world famous UNIX system was developed in C, but is it the only popular application that has been developed using C? You’ll be astonished to see the list of applications that follows: The world desktop operating market is dominated by three major operating systems: Windows, MAC, and Linux. The kernel of all these OSes has been developed using the C programming language. Similarly, Android, iOS, and Windows are some of the popular mobile operating systems whose kernels were developed in C. Just like UNIX, the development of Oracle Database began on Assembly and then switched to C. It’s still widely regarded as one of the best database systems in the world. Not only Oracle but MySQL and PostgreSQL have also been developed using C – the list goes on and on. What does the future hold for C? So far we discussed the high points of C programming, it’s design principle and the applications that were developed using it. But the bigger question to ask is, what its future might hold. The answer to this question is tricky, but there are several indicators which show positive signs. IoT is one such domain where the C programming language shines. Whether or not beginner programmers should learn C has been a topic of debate everywhere. The general consensus says that learning C is always a good thing, as it builds up your fundamental knowledge of programming and it looks good on the resume. But IoT provides another reason to learn C, due to the rapid growth in the IoT industry. We already saw the massive number of applications built on C and their codebase is still maintained in it. Switching to a different language means increased cost for the company. Since it is used by numerous enterprises across the globe the demand for C programmers is unlikely to vanish anytime soon. Read Next Rust as a Game Programming Language: Is it any good? Google releases Oboe, a C++ library to build high-performance Android audio apps Will Rust Replace C++?last_img read more