More High School Rodeo Action scheduled for this weekend

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Northern B.C. High School Rodeo Association will be holding another round of Rodeos this weekend as part of the Fall Rodeo Season.The last Highschool Rodeo to take place was August 24 and 25 in Prince George.In Prince George, Junior All Round Cowgirl went to Kerri Moat of Dawson Creek, with Junior All Round Cowboy going to Korbin Mills of Pink Mountain.- Advertisement -Senior All Round Cowgirl went to Zoey Hamming of Falkland and Senior All Round Cowboy went to Brock Everett of Williams Lake.The next B.C. High School Rodeos will be taking place this weekend, September 21 to the 22, in Hudson’s Hope and Falkland. The next High School Rodeos after that will be taking place on September 28 and 29 in Chetwynd and Langley.last_img

‘Continent of opportunities’ at Mining Indaba

first_img27 January 2014Business and political thought-leaders from Africa, Australia, North America and the UK will headline the 20th annual Investing in African Mining Indaba, taking place at the Cape Town International Convention Centre from 3 to 6 February.Mining Indaba’s “legendary robust discussions and access to industry game-changers” are expected to attract approximately 8 000 delegates this year, according to the organisers. About half the delegates are likely to be from Africa, with the rest coming from Europe, Australia, the Americas and Asia.The event will feature more than a dozen keynote speakers and over 50 sessions on investment opportunities and the leading mining companies across the African mining value chain.“This reflects accelerated mining interest around the African continent and underlines the essence of the Mining Indaba – this is where the world really connects with African mining,” event managing director Jonathan Moore said in a recent statement.South African Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu will deliver the welcoming address, while Eleni Gabre-Madhin, founder of the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange and recently named one of the 100 Most Influential Africans, heads up an impressive list of keynote speakers.Colin Barnett, Western Australia’s minister for state development, will focus on win-win mining scenarios for investors, mining companies and governments. Canadian consultant Phil Newman, CEO of CRU Strategies, will discuss the changing face of world mineral supply. And Paul Collier, director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies at Oxford University, will discuss mining and sustainable development.Makhtar Diop’s keynote address will be informed by his World Bank experience, currently as vice-president for the Africa region.Keynote panels will tackle themes such as the current status and future outlook for African mining and the impact of Asian growth on African mining. Participating in both topics will be Frank Holmes, adviser on sustainable development to the William J Clinton Foundation, and David Hale, a Chicago-based economist renowned for his global market research and insights.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Ohio ag groups pushing for TPA

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio agricultural and commodity organizations recently urged Congressman Jim Jordan to support the reauthorization of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) for President Obama. Jordan has publicly shared that he won’t support the bill. With the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations taking placing, it is vitally important to agriculture for the President to have TPA.The Ohio Agribusiness Association, Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association, Ohio Dairy Producers Association, Ohio Farm Bureau, Ohio Pork Council, Ohio Poultry Association, and Ohio Soybean Association sent the following letter to Congressman Jordan.Trade is vital to the U.S. Economy, and especially important to Ohio’s number one industry: agriculture. Currently, Congress is debating important legislation that affects all Ohioans and our state’s farmers, and Ohio Agriculture is hopeful that Congressman Jim Jordan will be supportive of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA).TPA provides guidelines for politicians as they pursue trade agreements that support U.S. jobs, eliminate barriers in foreign markets and establish rules to stop unfair trade.The success of the food and agriculture sectors, both in Ohio and nationally, are heavily dependent on continued growth in exports; therefore, Ohio farmers are extremely interested in the passage of TPA. Productivity in agriculture far outpaces the domestic market’s ability to consume it, and the U.S. needs to continue to push for greater access to foreign markets; this is only possible through trade agreements and TPA.In 2014, Ohio sent $52.1 billion of goods to foreign destinations, as the result of more than 263,000 jobs supported by exports. Ohio is the 9th largest exporting state in the nation, sending goods to 216 countries and territories in 2014.Farm and food exports have a positive multiplier effect throughout the U.S. economy and Ohio’s. Every $1 in U.S. farm exports stimulates an additional $1.22 in business activity, according to USDA. Exports of $150.5 billion in 2014 therefore generated another $183.61 billion in economic activity in the U.S. bringing the total economic benefit to the economy to $334.11 billion.These exports were made possible through trade agreements, made possible themselves by the enactment of Trade Promotion Authority. TPA gave U.S. negotiators the ability to extract the best deals possible from other countries. Without it, no country would be willing to make the tough concessions– the ones that would most benefit us — if they fear that Congress will subsequently demand more. The success of trade agreements relies heavily on TPA.Rejecting TPA would not be free of serious consequences. Nations around the world are negotiating bilateral trade deals. If competitors gain free access to our biggest markets while we continue to face substantial import barriers, our markets will inevitably shrink. Standing still on trade puts the U.S. at risk of falling behind in the global marketplace. In short, trade agreements, such as those being negotiated with eleven other countries under the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and with the European Union under the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), cannot achieve U.S. goals without TPA.In the TPP talks, the Administration is working hard to complete a high-standard, 21st century deal that will eliminate barriers to our exports and raise standards within the TPP nations. Should Congress not pass TPA, that would send a clear and unfortunate message to our TPP partners and to the world, that we are turning our back on the fastest growing economic region in the world. The economic cost to the United States and to Ohio from a failed TPP would be more than lost opportunities; it could result in a real loss of exports, market shares and jobs.TPP is the most important regional trade negotiation ever undertaken. In order for TPP to become a reality, Congress needs to renew the TPA legislation. We strongly urge Congressman Jim Jordan to support Ohio’s economy and jobs by supporting TPA.last_img read more

Propane Prices Low Pre-Harvest

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Russ QuinnDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — With much of the Corn Belt facing a late-maturing, high-moisture crop, some farmers are already making plans to dry their grain this fall. That means they’ll likely need to purchase propane — if they haven’t already — to fuel their grain dryers.Late summer and early fall is the time many farmers lock in propane prices for the grain-drying season. With a wet spring delaying planting this year, especially in the Eastern Corn Belt, there could be a lot of wet grain to dry this fall.Right now, propane prices are low thanks to high production of the fuel, according to propane analysts. But high demand for propane during harvest followed by a cold winter could push prices higher.PROPANE PRICE AT MULTI-YEAR LOWThere is a good supply of propane in the country as fall harvest begins, said DTN Refined Fuels Reporter Alton Wallace. That has been the case in the U.S. since the beginning of the “Shale Revolution” in 2012, which has allowed the country to dramatically increase crude oil and natural gas production, he said.According to U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics, propane production in the U.S. is now roughly about 1.8 million barrels per day (bpd). And production is continuing to increase, Wallace said, growing by 8.3% from 2017 to 2019.“We have a lot of propane right now,” Wallace said.One doesn’t have to be an economist to figure out that if supply outpaces demand, prices will decline, Wallace said. In mid-August, for example, the price of propane at the Conway, Kansas, hub fell to 37 cents per gallon, a three-and-a-half-year low, he said. In mid-September 2018, the price at Conway was near 78 cents a gallon.With propane production at record levels, the market is in an oversupply situation, and prices have been less volatile than in the past, Wallace said.“The U.S. has become an energy superpower because of the Shale Revolution,” he said.While it appears likely that propane prices will be fairly low this fall, there are some factors that could drastically alter that outlook, Wallace said.The propane market can see increased volatility due to the weather, Wallace said. As history has shown, extremely cold winter weather can cause an increase in propane demand and prices can skyrocket quickly. A harvest season in which farmers need more propane to dry down wet crops followed by a cold winter could create a situation where propane prices move considerably higher, he said.Another factor that could affect propane prices is the burgeoning export market.Because of its increased propane production, the U.S. has become a major exporter on the global market, Wallace said. EIA data for the week ended Sept. 13 showed U.S. propane exports at 1.162 million barrels per day.Wallace said companies are building export facilities as this is becoming an important component of the market. The downside to increased propane exports is if export demand for propane rises, those buying propane in the U.S. — such as farmers — are forced to compete for availability with the export market, he said.SOME BOOK PROPANE, SOME DON’TIn August, DTN asked readers about their propane-buying habits. This question was posed in the DTN 360 Poll: “As propane production has increased and domestic demand has been flat, the price of propane has dropped to half its value during the past 12 months. Some farmers may be thinking about their propane needs for the upcoming crop drying and heating. What is your plan for propane this late-summer/fall?”The poll received a total of 171 responses. Of those, 46% said they “Will book propane in August.” Thirty-nine percent said they were “Not going to book propane at all,” while 12% said they “Will book propane in September.” The remaining 3% said they “Will book propane in October.This week, Mark Nowak, a farmer and ag consultant from Wells, Minnesota, told DTN his propane dealer was set to visit him the same day to preorder some of his propane needs. He was set to lock his propane price at $1.08 per gallon, which he said was down from last year ($1.19 per gallon) and 2017 ($1.13 per gallon).There could be a lot of crop drying needed this fall across the Corn Belt, Nowak said. He estimated that most of the corn will black layer by Oct. 1, and thus, the moisture at that time would likely be around 32%.Most farmers harvest corn around 22%-24%, so the crop will need to dry 8% to 10% in October, he said.“I think the month of October is going to be the wildcard here,” Nowak said. “If we continue to see this warm and dry weather, I think the crop can dry down pretty good. But if we see cool and cloudy weather, maybe we will be doing a lot of drying.”CROP MOST BEHIND IN EASTERN CORN BELTCorn and soybean planting was delayed across much of the Corn Belt this spring by wet field conditions, but one region where this was especially true was the Eastern Corn Belt. Areas in Illinois, Indiana and Ohio saw much rain, which pushed planting to as late as the summer in some cases.Brian Scott, who farms near Monticello, Indiana, said his region will see a late harvest this fall. He estimated harvest could be around a month later than normal.“We have a lot of corn that probably won’t black layer until mid-October,” Scott told DTN.Scott said the grain dryers in his region are going to be used this fall. It has been a couple of years since they last used their grain-drying equipment, he said.Scott booked propane earlier this summer — not necessarily because of the amount of drying that could take place this fall, but to take advantage of a summer-fill discounted price. He topped off his 4,000-gallon storage tank like he normally does, he said.There are other farmers who are planning for the increased demand for propane this fall, Scott said. He said he knows of one farmer who built a new propane storage facility so he could get a good price on propane this year. The new facility will allow him to take a full semi-truckload of propane, Scott said.Another farmer who already booked some propane was Mike Cooprider of Howesville, Indiana. He planted his corn from May 18 through June 5. However, he wasn’t able to plant his soybeans until July 15.“Like most farmers, we are praying for a long fall,” Cooprider said.Cooprider said he dries “a lot of corn” every fall, but this year, he could be drying all of his corn crop. For that reason, he has already filled the propane tanks at his bin sites, he said.Russ Quinn can be reached at russ.quinn@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @RussQuinnDTN(AG/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

DD blacked out Tripura CM’s speech, says CPI(M)

first_imgThe CPI(M) said on Tuesday that Tripura Chief Minister Manik Sarkar’s Independence Day speech was blacked out by Doordarshan and All India Radio. “Doordarshan and All India Radio had recorded his speech… However, they subsequently informed him that the speech could not be carried as it stood and asked him to ‘reshape’ it,” the party said in a statement. The act was reminiscent of the “Emergency days,” it said. “In fact, it goes beyond as it seeks to gag the elected Chief minister of a State. The Centre is trampling upon the autonomy of Doordarshan/AIR and Prasar Bharati by such acts of censorship.” In a series of tweets, CPI(M) general secretary Sitaram Yechury said DD’s and AIR’s behaviour was against “cooperative federalism” that Prime Minister Narendra Modi talked about. “Doordarshan is not the private property of the BJP or the RSS. Its refusal to broadcast Tripura CM’s speech is undemocratic and illegal,” he said. The IANS news service quoted Mr. Sarkar as saying in his speech that India was yet to get economic independence. “India got independence 70 years ago. Indians got political freedom, but they have not got economic independence yet,” he said. He claimed that over 70 lakh workers were retrenched in one year and over 1.35 crore youths were jobless despite having professional degrees. “The main political parties are misguiding the people, especially the youth, for their narrow political interests. Divisions are being created among people in the name of religion and other issues,” he said. According to sources, this year, Doordarshan has shifted the speeches of all Chief Ministers from main DD channels to DD Bharti. A former Prasar Bharti official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said it was a break from the past. “There is no precedent of DD or AIR dictating a Chief Minister’s speech. Usually, it is telecast live on DD’s regional channels and a round-up is shown on DD National,” he said.last_img read more