Redefining Success in Print Media

first_img Engaging audiences on different platforms was a key theme throughout the day. While many publishers have established social media platforms, it remains an area that brands want to improve upon. Snapchat Discover and Facebook Live were a favorite topic, as they’re new platforms many companies have yet to crack open. But at this year’s min day summit in New York on Tuesday, several panelists noted that print is still an important platform and will likely remain relevant for at least the next ten years. Digital and print are often framed in opposition, but by seeing the two platforms as complementary, one can conceive of print’s continuing success. The definition of a successful print magazine just might have to change. Panelists Larry Burstein, publisher at New York Media, Christian Baesler, president of Bauer Xcel Media, and Scott Burton, executive editor of ESPN The Magazine, specifically explored this concept. Each panelist took a different approach towards print and digital. NEW YORK—Over the past decade or so, it has become relatively common to hear the phrase “print is dead.” In this environment, context and engagement matter more than ever. “If you create a better experience in these mobile environments, you’re more likely to succeed in the long term,” he said. This means erasing loading time—if it takes longer than ten seconds, half your audience is gone. Google’s AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) thereby aims to create a faster environment for consumers to engage with content. “The next $50 billion will come from a better mobile experience,” announced Craig DiNatali, Google’s director of News Media Partnerships and the keynote speaker. Media is increasingly being consumed in different verticals, as behavior and consumption has changed drastically. Almost 80% of people access news on mobile devices today.   The rest of the min day Summit saw more than 25 leaders from magazine media, advertising agencies, and tech companies discuss specific challenges, strategies, and opportunities in the industry. Speakers examined a wide range of topics, from exploring the possibilities of virtual reality to understanding Hispanic marketing. In contrast, Bauer advocates for separate operations entirely. “Editorially, we found the tools you need as an editor to succeed in print versus digital are very different,” Baesler explained.center_img A lively group of industry professionals gathered at the Yale Club to hear the speakers, which included Kate Brady, director of media strategy and innovation at PepsiCo, Cathy Glosser, SVP licensing for Condé Nast, Mike Suggett, VP, executive producer, original programming at Ten/MindOverEye, and Michael Brownstein, VP and CRO of Meredith Corp. Burstein emphasized that New York Media focuses heavily on “reaching the audience in any way they want to be reached,” by integrating departments. ESPN the Magazine also uses an assimilated approach to take advantage of ESPN’s enormous reach. This allows for strategizing across all channels, resulting in wide coverage that engages audiences beyond the Magazine’s reach. Despite the different approaches, all three panelists maintained that print would be successful in the future, provided one understands the different context within which print exists today. Burstein and Burton agreed print magazines need to identify themselves as a place where people can access great stories. Certain content areas are better suited for digital because of the quick publishing time. But magazines offer a different reading experience, one that is finite and tangible. National Geographic’s vice president of social media, Rajiv Mody, discussed why brands should improve their social strategy, using the brand’s impressive use of Snapchat Discover as an example. Mody said that Discover should be as customized and engaging as possible for the audience. But such customization should not be relegated only to social media. It is also increasingly important in advertising. Digital may have initially been seen as a way to increase ad revenue and access, but brands have seen ad blockers, viewability problems, and other roadblocks appear. So customization is more important than ever, and clients reflect this. There is an increasing trend of clients partnering with brands to create custom content. But, as Shenan Reed, president, digital of MEC Global said, “We don’t spend enough time talking about the terrible creative that could be massively improved to help performance.”last_img read more

DU teachers support quota reform but not attack on VC residence

first_imgDU teachers support quota reform, but not attack on VC residenceMembers of Dhaka University Teachers’ Association formed a human chain on the campus on Tuesday, protesting at the attack on Dhaka University vice-chancellor’s official residence.The association held the protest rally at the foot of Aparajeya Bangla of Dhaka University around noon, demanding immediate arrest and punishment of the attackers, reports UNB.However, the teachers of Dhaka University extended their moral support to the demand for quota reform.Dramatist Ramendu Majumdar, who too joined the human chain, said the students’ demand to reform the quota system is logical but the attack on the VC’s house is totally unwanted.The attack was pre-planned, he claimed.The DUTA leaders observed that university students are not behind the attack and the attack was carried out as part of a plot.Sadeka Halim, dean of the Social Sciences faculty, urged the authorities concerned to bring the attackers to book.The association also announced programme to wear black badges from 11am to 11:59am on 12 April suspending their academic activities including classes.The DUTA leaders invited journalists to come to the VC’s residence on Wednesday around 11:00am as they would show the video footage of the attack.The teachers assured the agitating students that they will request the prime minister top bring logical reform in the quota system.However, a section of general students continued their silent protest over the law enforcers’ attack on the agitating students, carrying placards, in front of the DUTA human chain.Different slogans including “Why were attacks in the campus”, “Why were students injured?”, “Teachers (our guardians), we want answer”, were written in the placards.Amid demonstrations in Shahbagh and adjacent areas early Monday seeking reform in the quota system, some unknown attackers entered the VC’s residence breaking its main gate and ransacked several rooms and furniture.The attackers also set fire on two vehicles parked inside the VC’s residence.last_img read more

National HIV Testing Day

first_imgPark West Health System’s, “Hidden Garden,” program is sponsoring a Community Outreach and Health Fair on June 24th, from 11:00am to 3:00pm. The Community Outreach & Health Fair will be held at the health system’s Men and Family Health Center, located at 4151 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD 21215. Various speakers will present information, including former Mayor Shelia Dixon, as well as other community leaders that have a vested interest in the health and well being of the Park Heights Community.last_img

Melanin from Jurassicera mollusk could lead to new tool for cancer diagnosis

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Eumelanin from the Jurassic-era fossil has a nearly identical pump-probe signature as the eumelanin from its modern counterpart, S. officinalis. The finding that eumelanin survives for millions of years opens the opportunity for pathologists to analyze the eumelanin from decades-old tissue samples of cancer patients in order to better understand the different characteristics of a melanoma that spreads versus a melanoma that does not spread. Credit: Mary Jane Simpson, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society The researchers, Mary Jane Simpson, et al., led by Professor Warren S. Warren at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, have published their paper on their analysis of Jurassic-aged eumelanin in a recent issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.”Melanoma is a particularly bad cancer if it metastasizes,” Warren told Phys.org. “Unfortunately, the ‘gold standard’ of conventional diagnostic techniques (essentially, excision followed by pathology) does not do a very good job of predicting which diagnosed cancers are likely to spread. So, how do you fix a bad gold standard for a bad disease?”The best answer is retrospective studies—looking at decades-old specimens from patients, where you know the outcome—and trying to find systematic differences. That is impossible with most pathology methods because the tissue degrades. Our results show that it is possible with melanin-based diagnostics, since the melanin easily survives that long.”The researchers explain that human skin has two types of melanin, eumelanin and pheomelanin. The distribution of these two types assists in the diagnosis of melanoma skin cancer. One way to identify the types of melanin and their distribution in a given sample is to use a molecular imaging technique called pump-probe microscopy. Basically, an ultrafast laser pulse is first used to “pump,” or optically excite, the molecules. Then after a short time delay, one or more follow-up pulses are emitted to “probe” the molecules. By measuring how the probe pulses are absorbed or reflected by the molecules, researchers can obtain a pump-probe signature that reveals information on the molecules’ excitation decay process. Since eumelanin and pheomelanin have different pump-probe signatures, this technique enables scientists to distinguish between them. Citation: Melanin from Jurassic-era mollusk could lead to new tool for cancer diagnosis (2013, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-melanin-jurassic-era-mollusk-tool-cancer.html Here, the researchers compared the pump-probe signatures of the eumelanin from the ink sack of a Jurassic-era cephalopod (an ancient molluscan marine animal) with that of a modern cephalopod, the common cuttlefish. (Despite its name, cuttlefish are mollusks, not fish.) Although the Jurassic-era cephalopod is 162 million years older than its modern counterpart, the eumelanin pump-probe signatures of the two animals are essentially identical. This finding shows that eumelanin is extremely stable, and could potentially permit researchers to image archived tissue samples from deceased cancer patients and uncover more information than could be obtained through more traditional methods that analyze other, less stable chemicals. Squid ink from Jurassic period identical to modern squid ink, study shows Journal information: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters The researchers pointed out that they did find some variations in the eumelanin signatures from the two mollusks. However, they could trace these variations to the larger iron content in the ancient eumelanin compared with the modern sample. Eumelanin from the common cuttlefish is normally bound to a variety of transition metals such as iron, copper, and manganese, but washing the eumelanin with the solid acid EDTA removes the majority of the bound metals. When the researchers washed the ancient eumelanin with EDTA, its signature closely matched that of the modern, mostly iron-free eumelanin. Because iron affects the pump-probe signature of eumelanin, the microscopy technique could also potentially enable researchers to approximate the iron content of a sample. For example, pigmented human tissue often exhibits a wide range of pump-probe signatures, and some of the variation may be due to metal ion binding by the melanin. In the future, pathologists may use this knowledge to their advantage when investigating the molecular composition of eumelanin samples. Explore further © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. More information: Mary Jane Simpson, et al. “Pump-Probe Microscopic Imaging of Jurassic-Aged Eumelanin.” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2013, 4, 1924-1927. DOI: 10.1021/jz4008036 Common cuttlefish. ©Jarek Tuszynski / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0 & GDFL (Phys.org) —In a world where things seem to change overnight, melanin seems to stay essentially the same for more than 160 million years, a new study has found. Melanin is the biological pigment that determines an animal’s color, and is currently not very well understood. In the new study, scientists have found that a type of melanin called eumelanin from a Jurassic-era mollusk produces a signature when optically excited that is nearly identical to that of the optically excited eumelanin from its modern counterpart, Sepia officinalis, or the common cuttlefish. Because melanin survives so long, an analysis of the melanin from old cancerous tissue samples could give researchers a useful tool for predicting the spread of melanoma skin cancer in humans.last_img read more

KMC to conduct food drives during Puja

first_imgKolkata: The Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) will conduct regular food drives during Durga Puja, with a special emphasis on keeping the quality of packaged drinking water and soft drinks in check. “For the last few years, we have been conducting drives during Puja to ensure that quality of food is not compromised with. But there are chances of tampering with packaged water and soft drinks. So, I have instructed my team of food inspectors to give special focus on the same,” Member, Mayor-in-Council (Health) Atin Ghosh said. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeHe added that food safety officers have been directed to take strong action against the businessmen who will be found selling inferior quality drinks. The drive that will start in a day or two, will continue on a regular basis till Kali Puja. Ghosh will himself lead drives at Borough 6 on October 9, in Kankurgachi area on October 10, in Park Cicus and Gariahat area on October 11. “There will be random drives in food stalls adjacent to puja pandals in South Kolkata on October 13 and in North Kolkata on October 14,” he added. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedGhosh further assured city residents that no trace of formalin has been found in fish brought from Andhra Pradesh. “This year, we have collected as many as 88 fish samples from 22 markets in the city. After the Bihar government imposed ban on fish from Andhra Pradesh, we collected six samples from Patipukur Market. All these samples have been found to be safe,” Ghosh said, adding that further drives will continue in this regard. KMC has already examined the various samples of fish, meat, meat products and other things that have been collected during food drives in the last few months.last_img read more

Why does the C programming language refuse to die

first_imgAs a technology research analyst, I try to keep up the pace with the changing world of technology. It seems like every single day, there is a new programming language, framework, or tool emerging out of nowhere. In order to keep up, I regularly have a peek at the listicles on TIOBE, PyPL, and Stackoverflow along with some twitter handles and popular blogs, which keeps my FOMO (fear of missing out) in check. So here I was, strolling through the TIOBE index, to see if a new programming language is making the rounds or if any old timer language is facing its doomsday in the lower half of the table. The first thing that caught my attention was Python, which interestingly broke into the top 3 for the first time since it was ranked by TIOBE. I never cared to look at Java, since it has been claiming the throne ever since it became popular. But with my pupils dilated, I saw something which I would have never expected, especially with the likes of Python, C#, Swift, and JavaScript around. There it was, the language which everyone seemed to have forgotten about, C, sitting at the second position, like an old tower among the modern skyscrapers in New York. A quick scroll down shocked me even more: C was only recently named the language of 2017 by TIOBE. The reason it won was because of its impressive yearly growth of 1.69% and its consistency – C has been featured in the top 3 list for almost four decades now. This result was in stark contrast to many news sources (including Packt’s own research) that regularly place languages like Python and JavaScript on top of their polls. But surely this was an indicator of something. Why would a language which is almost 50 years old still hold its ground against the ranks of newer programming language? C has a design philosophy for the ages A solution to the challenges of UNIX and Assembly The 70s was a historic decade for computing. Many notable inventions and developments, particularly in the area of networking, programming, and file systems, took place. UNIX was one such revolutionary milestone, but the biggest problem with UNIX was that it was programmed in Assembly language. Assembly was fine for machines, but difficult for humans. Watch now: Learn and Master C Programming For Absolute Beginners So, the team working on UNIX, namely Dennis Ritchie, Ken Thompson, and Brian Kernighan decided to develop a language which could understand data types and supported data structures. They wanted C to be as fast as the Assembly but with the features of a high-level language. And that’s how C came into existence, almost out of necessity. But the principles on which the C programming language was built were not coincidental. It compelled the programmers to write better code and strive for efficiency rather than being productive by providing a lot of abstractions. Let’s discuss some features which makes C a language to behold. Portability leads to true ubiquity When you try to search for the biggest feature of C, almost instantly, you are bombarded with articles on portability. Which makes you wonder what is it about portability that makes C relevant in the modern world of computing. Well, portability can be defined as the measure of how easily software can be transferred from one computer environment or architecture to another. One can also argue that portability is directly proportional to how flexible your software is. Applications or software developed using C are considered to be extremely flexible because you can find a C compiler for almost every possible platform available today. So if you develop your application by simply exercising some discipline to write portable code, you have yourself an application which virtually runs on every major platform. Programmer-driven memory management It is universally accepted that C is a high-performance language. The primary reason for this is that it works very close to the machine, almost like an Assembly language. But very few people realize that versatile features like explicit memory management makes C one of the better-performing languages out there. Memory management allows programmers to scale down a program to run with a small amount of memory. This feature was important in the early days because the computers or terminals as they used to call it, were not as powerful as they are today. But the advent of mobile devices and embedded systems has renewed the interest of programmers in C language because these mobile devices demand that the programmers keep memory requirement to a minimum. Many of the programming languages today provide functionalities like garbage collection that takes care of the memory allocation. But C calls programmers’ bluff by asking them to be very specific. This makes their programs and its memory efficient and inherently fast. Manual memory management makes C one of the most suitable languages for developing other programming languages. This is because even in a garbage collector someone has to take care of memory allocation – that infrastructure is provided by C. Structure is all I got As discussed before, Assembly was difficult to work with, particularly when dealing with large chunks of code. C has a structured approach in its design which allows the programmers to break down the program into multiple blocks of code for execution, often called as procedures or functions. There are, of course, multiple ways in which software development can be approached. Structural programming is one such approach that is effective when you need to break down a problem into its component pieces and then convert it into application code. Although it might not be quite as in vogue as object-oriented programming is today, this approach is well suited to tasks like database scripting or developing small programs with logical sequences to carry out specific set of tasks. As one of the best languages for structural programming, it’s easy to see how C has remained popular, especially in the context of embedded systems and kernel development. Applications that stand the test of time If Beyoncé would have been a programmer, she definitely might have sang “Who runs the world? C developers”. And she would have been right. If you’re using a digital alarm clock, a microwave, or a car with anti-lock brakes, chances are that they have been programmed using C. Though it was never developed specifically for embedded systems, C has become the defacto programming language for embedded developers, systems programmers, and kernel development. C: the backbone of our operating systems We already know that the world famous UNIX system was developed in C, but is it the only popular application that has been developed using C? You’ll be astonished to see the list of applications that follows: The world desktop operating market is dominated by three major operating systems: Windows, MAC, and Linux. The kernel of all these OSes has been developed using the C programming language. Similarly, Android, iOS, and Windows are some of the popular mobile operating systems whose kernels were developed in C. Just like UNIX, the development of Oracle Database began on Assembly and then switched to C. It’s still widely regarded as one of the best database systems in the world. Not only Oracle but MySQL and PostgreSQL have also been developed using C – the list goes on and on. What does the future hold for C? So far we discussed the high points of C programming, it’s design principle and the applications that were developed using it. But the bigger question to ask is, what its future might hold. The answer to this question is tricky, but there are several indicators which show positive signs. IoT is one such domain where the C programming language shines. Whether or not beginner programmers should learn C has been a topic of debate everywhere. The general consensus says that learning C is always a good thing, as it builds up your fundamental knowledge of programming and it looks good on the resume. But IoT provides another reason to learn C, due to the rapid growth in the IoT industry. We already saw the massive number of applications built on C and their codebase is still maintained in it. Switching to a different language means increased cost for the company. Since it is used by numerous enterprises across the globe the demand for C programmers is unlikely to vanish anytime soon. Read Next Rust as a Game Programming Language: Is it any good? Google releases Oboe, a C++ library to build high-performance Android audio apps Will Rust Replace C++?last_img read more

Fedora 31 will now come with Mono 5 to offer opensource NET

first_imgFedora has always been shipping Mono 4.8, the open source development platform for building cross-platform applications, with each Fedora release. Even after shipping Mono 5.0 in May 2017, the company still continued with Mono 4.8. But it seems the idea will be changing now with the release of Fedora 31. With Fedora 31, the team at Fedora is finally planning to switch to Mono 5.20 which is expected to release later this year. An effort was made in the past few months by the Fedora team to build Mono from source. The build was also done for Debian using msc instead of csc and the reference assemblies were rebuilt from source. In case of Mono, it requires itself to build. The Mono version 4.8 which is included in Fedora currently, is too old to build version 5.20. Currently, the team has been using monolite and a little version of mono compiler, .NET 4.7.1 reference assemblies for first build time. The sources for the required patch files are maintained on Github. The transition from Mono 4 to Mono 5 was on halt because of the changes required in their compiler stack and its dependency upon some binary references. These binaries are available as a source but treated as pre-compiled binaries for simplification and speed. The Fedora developers are now working towards getting Mono 5 into Fedora 31. This will also let the cross-platform applications that are relying upon Microsoft’s .NET framework 4.7 and later to now work. Mono 4.8 is also not compatible for PowerPC 64-bit but it is expected that Mono 5 will be. To know more about this news, check out the change proposal. Read Next Fedora 29 released with Modularity, Silverblue, and more Swift is now available on Fedora 28 Fedora 29 beta brings Modularity, GNOME 3.30 support and other changeslast_img read more