Kid Cudi Opens Up About Mental Health With Jada Pinkett Smith Willow

first_imgNews The GRAMMY winner details his past struggles with substance abuse: “I was very good at keeping my troubles hidden”Ana YglesiasGRAMMYs Dec 18, 2018 – 3:35 pm Rapper Kid Cudi rose swiftly into the spotlight with his GRAMMY-nominated debut single “Day ‘N’ Nite” in 2008, along with a budding friendship with Kanye West, who signed him to his G.O.O.D. Music label that year. Fast-forward to 2018, with plenty more successes under his belt, Cudi has revealed that at one point he was silently—yet deeply­—struggling through it.”I was very good at keeping my troubles hidden. Even from my friends, I was really good at that,” Cudi shares in a recent conversation on “Red Table Talk,” a Facebook Watch show hosted by Jada Pinkett Smith, along with her daughter, Willow Smith, and mother, Adrienne Banfield-Norris. The topic of discussion was mental health, with Cudi sharing his personal struggles with stress, depression and substance abuse, and how he was finally able to heal.The episode, titled “Confronting Mental Illness,” opened with a discussion with the three generations of women, who brought in Cudi as their special guest. As he sat down, Jada shared how special it was to see one of the artists her children looked up to (including Willow, who has put out two albums of her own) live up to his name.In turn, Cudi revealed how he felt pressure to be someone people could look up to, which caused him to feel he didn’t have space for how he really felt.”It’s like my life was like this show and I was always supposed to be on, but when the show was over I was completely miserable. For a long time I was not happy when I woke up in the morning,” the rapper said. “It took me a minute to realize there was something going wrong with me.”He shared that he had struggled with drug use when he first was in the public eye, and quit after getting arrested in 2010. When the spotlight came for him in 2008, he felt new stresses and had no outlet for his emotions, nor did he feel like he had anyone to really help him through this new lifestyle in a healthy way.”Being famous…was weird for me early on. It happened really fast for me, and nobody coached me, no mentorship, I was just kinda in it. I was a kid. 23, 24 is still a kid…it was like, ‘Oh, maybe if I try drugs I can be okay,'” Cudi explained.He also shared that he always hid his drug use from everyone in his life, and in addition to feeling pressure to keep up his image as “everybody’s hero,” he also kept his struggles to himself “because I was ashamed.” This led to a rollercoaster of bottled emotions, secret on-and-off drug use and deep levels of unhappiness. He said that by 2016 “when I wasn’t at work it was a nightmare. So I used drugs again.”Jada asked if he thought he had been using drugs to try to manage the depression, to which Cudi agreed, and revealed he eventually reached a breaking point which led him to find help where he could face his pain head-on. “[Rehab] finally helped me talk through it…I don’t think I ever really did that in my life. I never really thought about ‘Well, why am I depressed?'”Towards the end of the conversation Willow tearfully brought up young people dying, like the late rapper Mac Miller: “So many young people are just dying because of trying to satiate those emotions with drugs.”Cudi’s story is triumphant and points to the struggle so many young people in the public eye and the music industry face. It also demonstrates how artists’ honesty about their pain can not only help them process, but it can help others struggling with depression and addiction relate as well.Logic Opens Up About His Truth & “Hardest Years Of My Life, Mentally”Read more Email Kid Cudi Opens Up About Mental Health kid-cudi-opens-about-mental-health-jada-pinkett-smith-willow-smith Kid Cudi Opens Up About Mental Health With Jada Pinkett Smith & Willow Smith Twitter Facebook last_img read more

OBITUARY Maureen A Sullivan 43

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Maureen A. Sullivan, age 43, of Wilmington, passed away unexpectedly on May 20, 2018.Maureen was the cherished daughter of Ronald D. and Claire L. (Gagnon) Sullivan of Wilmington, dear sister of Ronald D. Sullivan, Jr. & his wife Sherry of Manchester, NH, Robert Sullivan & his partner Christine Brady of Lowell, Christopher Sullivan & his wife Rhonda of Derry, NH and Richard Sullivan & his partner Mary Hunt of Raymond, NH, loving aunt of Jewell, Jade, Daniel, Nicholas and Caleb. Maureen is also survived by many aunts, uncles and cousins.Family and friends will gather for a Funeral Service at the Nichols Funeral Home, Inc., 187 Middlesex Ave., (Rte. 62), Wilmington on Friday, May 25th at 11:00 a.m. Interment to follow in Wildwood Cemetery, Wilmington. Visiting hours will be held at the Funeral Home on Thursday, May 24th from 4:00 – 8:00 p.m.Memorial donations in Maureen’s name may be made to St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105.Maureen A. Sullivan(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Maureen F. (McKenna) McHugh, 80In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Ronald D. “Herman” Sullivan, 71In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Marie J. (Ciampa) Cummings, 81In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Tata Global Beverages may sell its China operations

first_imgTata Global Beverages on Wednesday said it might sell its loss-making China subsidiary. The company’s Chinese subsidiary, called Zhejiang Tata Tea Extraction Company, reported a net loss of Rs. 15 crore in the previous financial year.  “For China, we are exploring different options, which could be restructuring or a sale,” Cyrus Mistry, the Tata Group Chairman, said at Tata Global Beverage’s (TGB) annual shareholder meeting in Kolkata on Wednesday.The Indian non-alcoholic beverage company holds 81 percent in Zhejiang Tata Tea Extraction (ZTTECL). According to TGBL’s balance sheet, the Chinese subsidiary reported losses of over Rs. 100 crore in the financial year that ended on Dec. 31 Dec, 2015.”We continue to have those challenges and will take a call on the business there in the coming year. It is significantly a B2B business over there. It is not a consumer business. That’s not the reason that business is getting impacted. The reason is more from a productive prospective,” Mistry added. Various options have been considered for “restructuring” the Chinese business. The joint venture recorded liabilities of Rs. 115.54 crore and loss after tax was pegged at Rs. 15.34 crore as of December 31, 2015, according to TGBL’s annual report. “Delays continue in stabilisation of the China business. While prospective customers have shown interest in our instant tea products, the final conversion to orders will be dependent on meeting the product profile requirements. Going forward, stabilising the production process and establishing a pipeline of external customers and successful scaling of technology will be key to the success of the project,” the annual report said.The joint venture between Zhejiang Tata Tea Extraction and TGBL was inked in 2007. TGBL holds 70 percent stake while ZTTECL holds the rest. The TGBL stock was trading at Rs. 141.75 at around 2.31 p.m. on Thursday, up 1 percent from its previous close on the Bombay Stock Exchange.last_img read more

Training Requirements Stifle Black Immigrants Upward Mobility

first_imgThe Washington D.C. Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA-DC) held a Reporters’ Roundtable May 17 to discuss current immigration issues relating to youth in the United States. While immigration reform and the needs of first-generation immigrant youth often focus on Latinos, the roundtable revealed that sub-Saharan Africans tend to have the most difficulties assimilating into U.S. culture.According to the New Americans Integration Institute, out of all immigrant groups, sub-Saharan Africans find it particularly frustrating to move into the American workforce, despite being well qualified and highly educated, largely due to cultural and racial barriers. “If you’re a nurse or a doctor, there are so many federal and state requirements that you have to fill that become very, very complicated and time-consuming, and foreign degrees in general are often less valued than U.S. degrees,” said Jeff Gross, director of the New Americans Integration Institute at the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition.The result, as families like the Tureys, living in Southeast D.C. find, are children whose parents have advanced degrees, but who are unable to lift them out of poverty and forced to live and work in substandard conditions. “My husband has a master’s degree in mathematics and doctorate in engineering, but because his degrees were earned in Ethiopia, there is much paperwork and red tape to get through so he drives a taxi,” Mariama Turey told the AFRO. “The money is so poor with the Uber competition and people riding bicycles that we cannot afford to live like the professional-class people that we are.” Many foreign degrees require additional training before being accepted in the U.S.Turey’s four children, all born in the U.S., want what other U.S. children have, including cell phones and fashionable clothes. And while her husband would prefer she remain at home and not work, Turey said meeting the needs of the children and living above the poverty line require she braid hair in her spare time.“It is not a good situation for me at all because the laws are changing and I fear I will be forced to get a license to do something we consider to be a cultural service,” Turey said. “It makes you wonder if the system is not designed to keep you poor and begging when you cannot even scratch out a living without someone wanting to tax that as well.”But as Gross pointed out, assimilation or “Americanizing” oneself, remains the key to getting into the American professional job market. “If you don’t come to a job interview and approach it with an American attitude, an American style, and an American résumé, that credentialing document won’t do you much good,” Gross said.Still, for those like Turey, who wanted a bit of a hustle with hair braiding, the restrictions were found to be even worse. Licensing has spread inexorably through the U.S. labor market, often due to horror stories of people being harmed by the actions of someone without the necessary training, with occupational licensure, according to Forbes magazine, damaging the upward mobility of poor people and doing little to protect the public. And while challenged in court, new cases arise almost daily.In Tennessee, for instance, Pritchard v. Board of Cosmetology, the plaintiff Tammy Pritchard, was told she had to earn 300 hours of classroom instruction in order to wash hair in an African braiding salon. “These laws represent a hostile, anti-immigration work policy that makes it futile for hardworking citizens to gain full access to the American dream,” George Washington University foreign policy grad student, John Marshall told the AFRO. “When you acknowledge that in the 1950s roughly 5 percent of workers needed permission from federal, state, or local authorities to practice their occupation, these expensive licenses do a lot to keep Africans from earning money.”African immigrants from Nigeria, Ethiopia, Egypt, Ghana, and Kenya account for nearly half of the foreign-born African population in the U.S in 2013 and overwhelmingly settle in the South (38 percent) or the Northeast (27 percent) most often in New York, Maryland, D.C., and New Jersey.last_img read more

Schools almost out Celebrate with Sunwings Family Vacation sale

first_img TORONTO — With summer school break just around the corner, Sunwing is giving parents some much-needed vacation inspiration with a new promotion on all-inclusive vacation packages.Available to book from now until May 25, these packages are available at top-rated resorts across the Caribbean, Mexico and Central America. Depending on the resort they select, families can make their summer travel budget go even further with Kids Stay, Play and Eat FREE deals, special teen pricing, rooms that sleep families of five and more.Included in the promotion is the new Royalton Bavaro Resort and Spa in Punta Cana, situated on the legendary Bavaro Beach. There’s also the Jewel Runaway Bay Beach and Golf Resort in Montego Bay, Jamaica, a family-friendly property that’s home to Montego Bay’s largest water park, on-site kids clubs and the 18-hole Runaway Bay Golf Club.One of the tour operator’s most consistently popular resorts is Family Club at Grand Riviera Princess All Suites & Spa Resort in Riviera Maya, Mexico, which offers spacious rooms for families, some of which include bunk beds for kids. Other amenities include an on-site water park, Mini and Teen Clubs, 12 pools, tennis, basketball, soccer and more.More news:  Help Princess Cruises break the world record for largest vow renewal at seaAll vacation packages include return flights on Sunwing Airlines, which include a welcome sparkling wine toast, buy-onboard Sunwing Café menu with selections inspired by Food Network Canada Celebrity Chef Lynn Crawford, and backpacks for children filled with games and toys. Travelweek Group Posted by Share Tags: Sunwingcenter_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Friday, May 18, 2018 School’s (almost) out! Celebrate with Sunwing’s Family Vacation salelast_img read more