CNET Book Club Infinite Detail asks what if the internet dies

first_img Culture Share your voice CNET Book Club Tim Maughan (right) and Scott Stein (left) at the podcast studio. CNET Cast your mind forward, five, 10, 30 years. What will the future of the ultra-connected smart city be like? Glad you asked, because Infinite Detail is as good an exploration of the promises and fears of the next decade as you’re likely to read.Tim Maughan, a journalist for Vice/Motherboard, New Scientist and the BBC, joins us on the podcast to discuss his novel Infinite Detail. We talk about what scares him about smart cities, the possibilities and pitfalls of augmented reality, and a lot more.Subscribe: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher See Infinite Detail on Amazon9780374175412Infinite Detail. Tim Maughan/FSG Set in both a creepily frictionless New York City of the deep-surveillance near-future and a rebellious anti-surveillance community in Bristol, UK called The Croft, Infinite Detail also jumps back and forth in time. Half of the book takes place in a near future fully immersed in AR smartglasses and information-collecting infrastructures. The other half lives in an even farther-off future where the internet as we know it, and much of the global infrastructure, has collapsed.I won’t spoil anything else in between, but the politically-charged book follows the spirit of Cory Doctorow’s 2017 novel, Walkaway, and in some ways, Station 11 by Emily St. John Mandel: It’s both pre- and post-apocalyptic, and yet also oddly optimistic. I swear. About CNET Book Club The Book Club is hosted by a pair of self-proclaimed book experts: Dan Ackerman (author of the nonfiction video game history book The Tetris Effect), and Scott Stein, a playwright and screenwriter. We’ll be announcing our next Book Club selection soon, so send us your suggestions and keep an eye out for updates on Twitter at @danackerman and @jetscott. Previous episodes Borne by Jeff VanderMeerWalkaway by Cory DoctorowArtemis by Andy WeirDown the River Unto the Sea by Walter MosleyTen Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now by Jaron LanierCNET Book Club: Holiday 2018 gift guide specialTeam Human by Douglas RushkoffGiraffes on Horseback Salad by Josh Frank, Manuela Pertega, and Tim Heidecker Subscribe to CNET Book Club: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher 0 Tags Post a commentlast_img read more

VW Group settles lawsuit surrounding alleged fuel economy overstatement

first_img Tags 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better VW will update fuel economy labels for affected cars. Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow Owners of certain Volkswagen Group models are in for a payday, if a modest one. VW Group of America said on Friday it’s reached a settlement with plaintiffs over a lawsuit that alleged VW knowingly overstated fuel economy in a selection of vehicles.The settlement is worth $96.5 million and does not include an admission of guilt from Volkswagen. The automaker will also adjust fuel economy figures for 98,000 vehicles sold between 2013 and 2017 by 1 mile per gallon to reflect US labeling requirements.Owners and lessees will be paid from the settlement fund to reimburse them for extra money spent on fuel based on the allegedly false fuel economy ratings. Payments will depend on length of ownership with a sum of $5.40 to $24.30 heading to owners for each month they owned or leased the vehicle. The figures are all still subject to court approval, however.Further, VW said it will adjust its Greenhouse Gas Credits with the EPA to remove any additional credits it gained from the fuel economy discrepancy. Eventually, owners will need to submit a claim, but the process to do so isn’t ready just yet.The EPA began investigating the gasoline-powered vehicles following VW’s 2015 diesel scandal. Testing by the California Air Resources Board and EPA found transmission software that caused the models to shift differently during government testing to post better fuel economy than in the real world. According to the EPA, the software was present on 1 million vehicles, but only the 98,000 cars were discovered with lower fuel economy. 1 Share your voice More From Roadshow Comment Review • 2019 VW Golf GTI Rabbit review: The best daily driver gets better 32 Photos 2:07center_img More about 2019 Volkswagen Golf GTI 2019 Chevy Malibu review: Swing and a miss Volkswagen Now playing: Watch this: 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2018 Volkswagen e-Golf: 5 things you need to know 2019 Volkswagen Jetta GLI is a bargain sport sedan Car Industrylast_img read more

Slow internet speed for 150 mins

first_imginternet People have been experiencing slow internet since Monday morning as mobile phone operators have been asked to slow down internet speed in the morning for 150 minutes to check question paper leaks during the SSC examinations.The Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (BTRC) has instructed the operators to slow down internet speed from 8:00am to 10:30am from 12 to 24 February, says UNB.The instruction was given in a bid to prevent question paper leakage during the ongoing the Secondary School Certificate examinations, according to the BTRC.The internet was slowed down for 30 minutes from 10:00pm on Sunday as trial run following the directive of BTRC.Although the government took some measures to stop question paper leaks, the SSC question papers are being leaked out from the very first day of the examination.last_img read more

Subscription Fatigue Nearly Half of US Consumers Frustrated by Streaming Explosion Study

first_imgStreaming entertainment is smacking into the wall of the paradox of choice — and the cost to consumers of piecing multiple services together.The boom in subscription streaming services has given consumers more options than ever, with an array that includes Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, CBS All Access, Showtime and YouTube Premium. Even more are coming down the pike with Apple, Disney, WarnerMedia, NBCUniversal and others promising to enter the fray in a big way.But the plethora of options has a downside: Nearly half (47%) of U.S. consumers say they’re frustrated by the growing number of subscriptions and services required to watch what they want, according to the 13th edition of Deloitte’s annual Digital Media Trends survey. An even bigger pet peeve: 57% said they’re frustrated when content vanishes because rights to their favorite TV shows or movies have expired. Popular on Variety “Consumers want choice — but only up to a point,” said Kevin Westcott, Deloitte vice chairman and U.S. telecom and media and entertainment leader, who oversees the study. “We may be entering a time of ‘subscription fatigue.’”All told, there are more than 300 over-the-top video options in the U.S. With that fragmentation, there’s a clear opportunity for larger platforms to reaggregate these services in a way that can provide access across all sources and make recommendations based on all of someone’s interests, Westcott said. “Consumers are looking for less friction in the consumption process,” he said.Today, the average U.S. consumer subscribes to three video streaming services; 43% subscribe to both pay-TV and streaming services, per Deloitte’s study. Effectively, Westcott said, they’re cobbling together their own entertainment bundles from multiple providers.Again, the sprawl of content options presents headaches. Nearly half (49%) of consumers in Deloitte’s survey said the sheer amount of content available on subscription VOD makes it hard to choose what to watch. Meanwhile, consumers say they know exactly what they want to watch 69% of the time, but 48% say content is hard to find across multiple services. And 49% give up on searching for content if they can’t find it in a few minutes.Deloitte’s survey found strong growth in streaming video subscription services — with 69% of households now subscribing to one or more — and streaming music services (41%). Pay TV remained relatively flat with 65% of U.S. households subscribing to cable, satellite or telco TV.Other findings from Deloitte’s study:Originals drive subscriptions: High-quality original content continues to be a dominant factor in streaming video growth, with 57% of all current U.S. streaming consumers (and 71% of millennials, ages 22-35) saying they subscribe to streaming video services to access original content.TV ad loads: 75% of consumers say they would be more satisfied with pay-TV service if there were fewer ads, and 77% said ads on pay TV should be under 10 seconds. Respondents indicated 8 minutes of ads per hour of programming was the reasonable upper bound — while they also said that 16 minutes or more of commercials per hour is the point they would stop watching.Data privacy: Consumers are increasingly wary of how companies handle their data, with 82% saying they don’t believe companies do enough to protect their personal data. Just 7% of respondents believe the government should play a role in protecting their data.Voice assistants: Ownership of voice-enabled home speakers grew 140% year-over-year in 2018, with total penetration soaring from 15% to 36%. The top five uses of voice-enabled digital assistants are playing music, searching for information, getting directions, making phone calls and setting alerts. However, half of consumers said they don’t use voice-enabled digital assistants at all, and only 18% claimed to use if daily.Video games: 41% of U.S. consumers play games at least weekly; among Gen Z (14-21) consumers, 54% do. Gaming consoles are being used more often as an entertainment hub — to stream TV/movie content (46%), watch online content (42%), browse the internet (34%), stream music (25%), and stream eSports (11%).Esports: One-third of U.S. consumers watch esports at least once a week — and 54% of Gen Z respondents do.The U.S. data for the 13th edition of Deloitte’s Digital Media Trends survey was collected from an online survey of 2,003 consumers fielded from December 2018 to February 2019. Additional findings from the study are available at this link.center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more