LIBRARY LINEUP How To Talk To The Other Side on Sept 10

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a list of FREE upcoming programs for adults, teens and kids at the Wilmington Memorial Library.Registration begins 30 days prior to the event. Please register online using our Calendar of Events at www.wilmlibrary.org or by calling (978) 694-2099 (for Adult) or (978) 694-2098 (for Children/Teen). Please note we request registration for programs that are marked *RR. Thank you to the Friends of the Library for funding support for library programs!Adult EventsIntro to the Cloud *RRWednesday, September 4, 7 pmLearn about that mysterious Cloud. Technology Librarian Brad McKenna will discuss such cloud-based technologies as email, file storage, music/movie streaming, and more.Pints + Pages Book Group *RRThursday, September 5, 7 pmFeatured Book: Killers of the Flower Moon by David GrannLocation: Red Heat Tavern (patio)-WilmingtonSocial book group geared towards readers in their 20’s and 30’s. The group meets on the first Thursday of every other month.  Librarians from the Wilmington and Reading Public Libraries host the book discussion.Fiction Critique Group*RRSaturday, September 7, 9:15 am Love writing fiction? Whether you are drafting a short story or a novel, joining our Critique Group is a great opportunity to meet other writers and get constructive feedback in a supportive environment. When registering, please provide your email address so you can receive an agenda and any prep materials before the meeting. Open to all experience levels writing in all genres. Led by local writing enthusiast, Barbara Alevras.Great Decisions Discussion Series (cost $10 per person)Mondays, September 9, 16, 30, and October 7, 7:30 pmWednesdays, September 18 and 25, 7 pmThis six-session Great Decisions program focuses on some of the most thought provoking foreign policy challenges facing Americans. Long time facilitator Keith West will lead the four Monday night sessions and Library Trustee and high school history teacher Dan Hall will lead the two Wednesday night sessions. Register at the Main DeskInternet Search Strategies *RRTuesday, September 10, 10 amHaving trouble finding what you are looking for online? Learn effective strategies for getting the best results from search engines like Google.How to Talk to the Other Side* RRTuesday, September 10, 6:30 pmMediumship is the ability to sense the Spirit of those who have lived on earth before and decipher the messages they wish to share with us. In an intimate setting, Kim Dunsmore and Leslie Gabriele (www.withloveandgratitude.com) will relay messages from family, loved ones, and friends who have passed from your life. Attendees are encouraged to bring canned goods for the Wilmington Food Pantry.Stephen Bates Quartet* RRThursday, September 12, 7 pmThe Stephen Bates Quartet will perform an eclectic program of classical music featuring works by the three Bs — Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms — as well as pieces by 20th-21st century composers Astor Piazzolla, Bela Bartok, and Armando Ghidoni. These highly regarded musicians and teachers have performed in orchestras and chamber groups around the globe.Kids & Teen EventsTeen Advisory Board *RRTuesday, September 3, 7 pmThis is your chance to tell us what library programs you want to attend and what books, movies, and games we should have available for checkout in the Teen Zone. You’ll earn one hour of community service for your time and input into making the library a more teen-centered place!Wednesday, September 4, 6:30 pm*RRMagic Show with Stephen BrennerCome see an educational, fun, and interactive magic show filled with animals who appear and disappear! Children will learn about and get to pet animals in between magic tricks during this silly and entertaining show! Ages 4+LEGO Building Thursday, September 5, 3:45 pmBuild a unique LEGO creation.  Kindergarten+SAT Practice Test *RRGrades 10-12Saturday, September 7, 12:30-4:30 pmPractice the SAT for free! Students take the entire 3 hour and 50 minute test allowing an extra 25 minutes for breaks, and then receive their results courtesy of The Princeton Review. Please bring pencils and a scientific calculator.Wilmington Community PlaygroupMonday, September 9, 9:30 amAt this drop-in playgroup we will begin with a story and then play together! Led by the CTI Family Resource Network.Ages 2-5Art Adventures *RRTuesday, September 10, 3:45Create your own masterpiece! We’ll explore different forms of media and techniques to make one of a kind artwork for you to take home.  Grades 1-5Read to Thor *RRTuesday, September 10, 5-6:30Come read to Thor, a beautiful dog who loves to listen to kids read! Sign up for one 15 minute session per reader.Kindergarten Book Club *RRThursday, September 12, 3:45This book club is for Kindergarteners who miss storytime or those who love to be read to. We will read and discuss a few books together, then do a fun activity.Labor Day Weekend HoursThe library will be closed Saturday, August 31 through Monday, September 2.(NOTE: The above listings are from the Wilmington Memorial Library.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.comShare this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLIBRARY LINEUP: Library To Host 6-Week Great Decisions Series On Foreign Policy TopicsIn “Community”LIBRARY LINEUP: FREE Bach, Beethoven, & Brahams Concert On Sept. 12In “Community”LIBRARY LINEUP: Storytime at Farmers Market on Aug. 4; Revere Beach Memories on Aug. 5In “Community”last_img read more

VW Group settles lawsuit surrounding alleged fuel economy overstatement

first_img Tags 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better VW will update fuel economy labels for affected cars. Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow Owners of certain Volkswagen Group models are in for a payday, if a modest one. VW Group of America said on Friday it’s reached a settlement with plaintiffs over a lawsuit that alleged VW knowingly overstated fuel economy in a selection of vehicles.The settlement is worth $96.5 million and does not include an admission of guilt from Volkswagen. The automaker will also adjust fuel economy figures for 98,000 vehicles sold between 2013 and 2017 by 1 mile per gallon to reflect US labeling requirements.Owners and lessees will be paid from the settlement fund to reimburse them for extra money spent on fuel based on the allegedly false fuel economy ratings. Payments will depend on length of ownership with a sum of $5.40 to $24.30 heading to owners for each month they owned or leased the vehicle. The figures are all still subject to court approval, however.Further, VW said it will adjust its Greenhouse Gas Credits with the EPA to remove any additional credits it gained from the fuel economy discrepancy. Eventually, owners will need to submit a claim, but the process to do so isn’t ready just yet.The EPA began investigating the gasoline-powered vehicles following VW’s 2015 diesel scandal. Testing by the California Air Resources Board and EPA found transmission software that caused the models to shift differently during government testing to post better fuel economy than in the real world. According to the EPA, the software was present on 1 million vehicles, but only the 98,000 cars were discovered with lower fuel economy. 1 Share your voice More From Roadshow Comment Review • 2019 VW Golf GTI Rabbit review: The best daily driver gets better 32 Photos 2:07center_img More about 2019 Volkswagen Golf GTI 2019 Chevy Malibu review: Swing and a miss Volkswagen Now playing: Watch this: 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2018 Volkswagen e-Golf: 5 things you need to know 2019 Volkswagen Jetta GLI is a bargain sport sedan Car Industrylast_img read more

Training Requirements Stifle Black Immigrants Upward Mobility

first_imgThe Washington D.C. Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA-DC) held a Reporters’ Roundtable May 17 to discuss current immigration issues relating to youth in the United States. While immigration reform and the needs of first-generation immigrant youth often focus on Latinos, the roundtable revealed that sub-Saharan Africans tend to have the most difficulties assimilating into U.S. culture.According to the New Americans Integration Institute, out of all immigrant groups, sub-Saharan Africans find it particularly frustrating to move into the American workforce, despite being well qualified and highly educated, largely due to cultural and racial barriers. “If you’re a nurse or a doctor, there are so many federal and state requirements that you have to fill that become very, very complicated and time-consuming, and foreign degrees in general are often less valued than U.S. degrees,” said Jeff Gross, director of the New Americans Integration Institute at the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition.The result, as families like the Tureys, living in Southeast D.C. find, are children whose parents have advanced degrees, but who are unable to lift them out of poverty and forced to live and work in substandard conditions. “My husband has a master’s degree in mathematics and doctorate in engineering, but because his degrees were earned in Ethiopia, there is much paperwork and red tape to get through so he drives a taxi,” Mariama Turey told the AFRO. “The money is so poor with the Uber competition and people riding bicycles that we cannot afford to live like the professional-class people that we are.” Many foreign degrees require additional training before being accepted in the U.S.Turey’s four children, all born in the U.S., want what other U.S. children have, including cell phones and fashionable clothes. And while her husband would prefer she remain at home and not work, Turey said meeting the needs of the children and living above the poverty line require she braid hair in her spare time.“It is not a good situation for me at all because the laws are changing and I fear I will be forced to get a license to do something we consider to be a cultural service,” Turey said. “It makes you wonder if the system is not designed to keep you poor and begging when you cannot even scratch out a living without someone wanting to tax that as well.”But as Gross pointed out, assimilation or “Americanizing” oneself, remains the key to getting into the American professional job market. “If you don’t come to a job interview and approach it with an American attitude, an American style, and an American résumé, that credentialing document won’t do you much good,” Gross said.Still, for those like Turey, who wanted a bit of a hustle with hair braiding, the restrictions were found to be even worse. Licensing has spread inexorably through the U.S. labor market, often due to horror stories of people being harmed by the actions of someone without the necessary training, with occupational licensure, according to Forbes magazine, damaging the upward mobility of poor people and doing little to protect the public. And while challenged in court, new cases arise almost daily.In Tennessee, for instance, Pritchard v. Board of Cosmetology, the plaintiff Tammy Pritchard, was told she had to earn 300 hours of classroom instruction in order to wash hair in an African braiding salon. “These laws represent a hostile, anti-immigration work policy that makes it futile for hardworking citizens to gain full access to the American dream,” George Washington University foreign policy grad student, John Marshall told the AFRO. “When you acknowledge that in the 1950s roughly 5 percent of workers needed permission from federal, state, or local authorities to practice their occupation, these expensive licenses do a lot to keep Africans from earning money.”African immigrants from Nigeria, Ethiopia, Egypt, Ghana, and Kenya account for nearly half of the foreign-born African population in the U.S in 2013 and overwhelmingly settle in the South (38 percent) or the Northeast (27 percent) most often in New York, Maryland, D.C., and New Jersey.last_img read more

Study suggests women in biomedical sciences have equal chance of success in

first_img Potential gender bias against female researchers in peer review of research grants © 2018 Phys.org A team of researchers at the National Institutes of Health has found that women in biomedical sciences are just as successful as men in sustaining grant funding. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of grant approval rates for men and women in the biomedical sciences. Citation: Study suggests women in biomedical sciences have equal chance of success in sustaining grant funding (2018, July 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-women-biomedical-sciences-equal-chance.html Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domaincenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More information: Lisa A. Hechtman et al. NIH funding longevity by gender, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1800615115AbstractWomen have achieved parity with men among biomedical science degree holders but remain underrepresented in academic positions. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the world’s largest public funder of biomedical research—receives less than one-third of its new grant applications from women. Correspondingly, women compose less than one-third of NIH research grantees, even though they are as successful as men in obtaining first-time grants. Our study examined women’s and men’s NIH funding trajectories over time (n = 34,770), exploring whether women remain funded at the same rate as men after receiving their first major research grants. A survival analysis demonstrated a slightly lower funding longevity for women. We next examined gender differences in application, review, and funding outcomes. Women individually held fewer grants, submitted fewer applications, and were less successful in renewing grants—factors that could lead to gender differences in funding longevity. Finally, two adjusted survival models that account for initial investigator characteristics or subsequent application behavior showed no gender differences, suggesting that the small observed longevity differences are affected by both sets of factors. Overall, given men’s and women’s generally comparable funding longevities, the data contradict the common assumption that women experience accelerated attrition compared with men across all career stages. Women’s likelihood of sustaining NIH funding may be better than commonly perceived. This suggests a need to explore women’s underrepresentation among initial NIH grantees, as well as their lower rates of new and renewal application submissions. Prior research has shown that despite receiving approximately half of all advanced degrees in the biomedical sciences, women are still vastly underrepresented in tenured positions at major universities. It has been suggested by some in the field that part of the reason for this disparity is the view held by many women who pursue advanced degrees that they will have limited opportunities should they pursue an academic career path. The researchers note that such a path generally involves becoming successful at applying for grants to carry out research. The researchers further suggest that many women believe this path is biased against women and thus choose to pursue careers in the corporate world as a more viable alternative. But are such beliefs justified? That is what the researchers sought to learn.To find out, the researchers ran queries on databases maintained by NIH that hold information regarding grants for the years 1991 through 2010. In so doing, they compared rates of success for first-time applicants as well as for those who apply for and receive grants repeatedly. They found that male first-time applicants far outnumbered female first-time applicants. But they also found that the rates of success for women who applied for and received grants repeatedly were much closer. And when they compared success rates by age and amount of education, they found that the rates were nearly identical for the two genders. The researchers suggest that this indicates that the so-called “leaky pipeline” is not applicable to women in the biomedical sciences. They further suggest that there is a degree of misinformation surrounding opportunities for women in the biomedical sciences and that more needs to be done to counteract it. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Device Makers Telecoms Face Competing Government Demands on Privacy

first_img 3 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. For tech companies, there was a confounding juxtaposition in the news this week.On Monday, the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission announced a joint effort to assure that businesses are safeguarding their customers’ data. The FCC sent a letter to mobile carriers, citing “a growing number of vulnerabilities … that threaten the security and integrity of a user’s device and all the personal, sensitive data on it,” and asking how carriers address those vulnerabilities.The FTC simultaneously ordered eight manufacturers of mobile devices to respond to a detailed set of questions about how they update the devices’ security protections and keep customers informed of those updates.Meanwhile, on Wednesday, as Julia Harte reported for Reuters, FBI Director James Comey said in press briefing that he expects to keep litigating to force companies like Apple to help investigators access their customers’ data.Terrorist groups rely on encryption, Comey said, suggesting — as the government argued throughout its attempt to compel Apple to help crack security on an iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooter — that law enforcement agencies believe they are entitled to assistance from tech companies.So, one set of government agencies is pressuring mobile companies to keep customer data secure while another segment of the government is pressuring the same companies to help investigators access data.And on the criminal front, we are not talking about an incidental number of customers. Comey told reporters Wednesday that the FBI has examined about 4,000 devices since October, but that’s just one aspect of the government’s data excavation.In a must-read essay published Friday on the website justsecurity.org, U.S. Magistrate Judge Stephen Smith of Houston estimated that state and federal courts may be issuing a half-million secret surveillance orders every year.Apple, Microsoft and other mobile companies have been pushing back against government data demands. (The Electronic Frontier Foundation publishes a handy scorecard, Who Has Your Back?, on the compliance policies of 24 social media, telecom, mobile device and Internet companies.)In response to Apple’s opposition, the Justice Department accused the company of putting its business interests ahead of national security. According to the government, tech companies know their customers are worried about keeping their personal information private, so the companies put on a show of opposing court-authorized investigative requests.Now Apple and fellow tech companies can point out that the federal government itself, via the FCC and FTC, is pestering them to prioritize the protection of customer data.Is there a perfect balance between data privacy and law enforcement? It seems elusive in these relatively early days of the mobile revolution, with Congress so far reluctant to define the responsibilities of the private companies we entrust with our personal information and courts muddling through case-by-case facts. And as we saw this week, the executive branch is of at least two minds about the primary obligations of tech companies.For lawyers (and reporters), the double-sided squeeze on tech companies makes for interesting work. But as mobile device customers and citizens, we’d better hope for consensus to emerge.(Reporting by Alison Frankel; Editing by Alessandra Rafferty.) This story originally appeared on Reuters Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global May 13, 2016 Register Now »last_img read more