STATE REP RACE QA Erin Buckley Explains Why Shes Running Describes Her

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Apple is asking weekly questions to the seven candidates running in contested primaries for the Wilmington/Tewksbury State Representative seat (19th Middlesex).Below, in her own words, are the responses to this week’s questions from candidate Erin Buckley (R-Tewksbury).#1) Why do you want to be our State Representative? (submitted by Mary Kiesinger of Wilmington)I want to have the privilege of being the State Representative for the 19th Middlesex because it is a position of vital importance for which no one would — or could — do a better job than I. I have worked in the State House, twice, once as an intern in the Governor’s Office and once as a Legislative Aide. I sit on Tewksbury’s Finance Committee and its Local Housing Partnership. I know, first hand, what it takes to do this job and I know what Tewksbury and Wilmington need from Beacon Hill. My goal is to streamline the communication between town hall and state house — and it is one I will achieve.#2) Do you consider yourself a liberal, conservative or moderate? Please describe your political ideology. (submitted by Danielle Driscoll of Tewksbury)I am a proud conservative. Where I fall within that umbrella term is also a position of personal pride: I am a classic libertarian. I believe in personal freedom and personal responsibility. I believe that government is here to engage in only the most essential duties that maintain a functioning society. I believe that government is there to help those who cannot help themselves, not those who can but won’t help themselves. I also believe that government is OF the people and FOR the people, and that the shift toward a ruling class of self-designated — or privately appointed — officials is setting both a dangerous and dysfunctional precedent.(NOTE: Do you have a question for the candidates? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com and it may be asked in a future Q&A or in a debate.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE: Voting Records Show Prinzivalli Voted Only Once Before Launching Candidacy; Campaign DisputesIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: 1 Candidate Drops Out, 8 Return Nomination Papers To State Before DeadlineIn “Government”BREAKING NEWS: 19th Middlesex State Rep Election Results Are In — Dave Robertson WinsIn “Government”last_img read more

Bomb recovery in BSMMU worries BNP about Khaledas life

first_imgBNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi. Prothom Alo File PhotoBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) has voiced deep concern over the life and security of its chairperson Khaleda Zia as a bomb-like object was reportedly recovered from the administrative building of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) on Thursday, reports UNB.Speaking at a press conference at BNP’s Naya Paltan central office, BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi on Friday demanded adequate security for their chairperson at the BSMMU where she has been receiving treatment since 1 April last.”How did a petrol bomb end up at the BSMMU amid tight security? We’re deeply worried over the life and security of our leader (Khaleda),” he said.The BNP leader said people suspect that such kind of incident cannot happen without either patronage of government high levels or a blue print of it.According to media reports, a crude bomb-like object was found in front of the registrar’s room at BSMMU administrative building on Thursday.Rizvi said the incident of the bomb recovery from BSMMU has stunned the country’s people since a three-time prime minister has been undergoing treatment at the hospital.He accused the government of making efforts to eliminate its political opposition through ‘destroying democracy’.Rizvi also said the government has kept their chairperson in jail unlawfully and deprived her of justice.He also demanded that the government ensure proper treatment of their chairperson.BNP leader also criticised the government over the demolition of the heritage building — ‘Jahajbari’ — in old Dhaka by ruling party men. “The incident has manifested that Awami League has turned into a grabbers’ party.”last_img read more

Training Requirements Stifle Black Immigrants Upward Mobility

first_imgThe Washington D.C. Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA-DC) held a Reporters’ Roundtable May 17 to discuss current immigration issues relating to youth in the United States. While immigration reform and the needs of first-generation immigrant youth often focus on Latinos, the roundtable revealed that sub-Saharan Africans tend to have the most difficulties assimilating into U.S. culture.According to the New Americans Integration Institute, out of all immigrant groups, sub-Saharan Africans find it particularly frustrating to move into the American workforce, despite being well qualified and highly educated, largely due to cultural and racial barriers. “If you’re a nurse or a doctor, there are so many federal and state requirements that you have to fill that become very, very complicated and time-consuming, and foreign degrees in general are often less valued than U.S. degrees,” said Jeff Gross, director of the New Americans Integration Institute at the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition.The result, as families like the Tureys, living in Southeast D.C. find, are children whose parents have advanced degrees, but who are unable to lift them out of poverty and forced to live and work in substandard conditions. “My husband has a master’s degree in mathematics and doctorate in engineering, but because his degrees were earned in Ethiopia, there is much paperwork and red tape to get through so he drives a taxi,” Mariama Turey told the AFRO. “The money is so poor with the Uber competition and people riding bicycles that we cannot afford to live like the professional-class people that we are.” Many foreign degrees require additional training before being accepted in the U.S.Turey’s four children, all born in the U.S., want what other U.S. children have, including cell phones and fashionable clothes. And while her husband would prefer she remain at home and not work, Turey said meeting the needs of the children and living above the poverty line require she braid hair in her spare time.“It is not a good situation for me at all because the laws are changing and I fear I will be forced to get a license to do something we consider to be a cultural service,” Turey said. “It makes you wonder if the system is not designed to keep you poor and begging when you cannot even scratch out a living without someone wanting to tax that as well.”But as Gross pointed out, assimilation or “Americanizing” oneself, remains the key to getting into the American professional job market. “If you don’t come to a job interview and approach it with an American attitude, an American style, and an American résumé, that credentialing document won’t do you much good,” Gross said.Still, for those like Turey, who wanted a bit of a hustle with hair braiding, the restrictions were found to be even worse. Licensing has spread inexorably through the U.S. labor market, often due to horror stories of people being harmed by the actions of someone without the necessary training, with occupational licensure, according to Forbes magazine, damaging the upward mobility of poor people and doing little to protect the public. And while challenged in court, new cases arise almost daily.In Tennessee, for instance, Pritchard v. Board of Cosmetology, the plaintiff Tammy Pritchard, was told she had to earn 300 hours of classroom instruction in order to wash hair in an African braiding salon. “These laws represent a hostile, anti-immigration work policy that makes it futile for hardworking citizens to gain full access to the American dream,” George Washington University foreign policy grad student, John Marshall told the AFRO. “When you acknowledge that in the 1950s roughly 5 percent of workers needed permission from federal, state, or local authorities to practice their occupation, these expensive licenses do a lot to keep Africans from earning money.”African immigrants from Nigeria, Ethiopia, Egypt, Ghana, and Kenya account for nearly half of the foreign-born African population in the U.S in 2013 and overwhelmingly settle in the South (38 percent) or the Northeast (27 percent) most often in New York, Maryland, D.C., and New Jersey.last_img read more

Should US Visa Control Tighten Heres How Overseas Tech Firms Might React

first_imgNovember 28, 2016 How Success Happens Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. This story originally appeared on Reuters Anticipating a more protectionist U.S. technology visa program under a Donald Trump administration, India’s $150 billion IT services sector will speed up acquisitions in the United States and recruit more heavily from college campuses there.Indian companies including Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), Infosys and Wipro have long used H1-B skilled worker visas to fly computer engineers to the U.S., their largest overseas market, temporarily to service clients.Staff from those three companies accounted for around 86,000 new H1-B workers in 2005-14. The U.S. currently issues close to that number of H1-B visas each year.  President-elect Trump’s campaign rhetoric, and his pick for Attorney General of Senator Jeff Sessions, a long-time critic of the visa program, have many expecting a tighter regime.”The world over, there’s a lot of protectionism coming in and push back on immigration. Unfortunately, people are confusing immigration with a high-skilled temporary workforce, because we are really a temporary workforce,” said Pravin Rao, chief operating officer at Infosys, India’s second-largest information technology firm.While few expect a complete shutdown of skilled worker visas as Indian engineers are an established part of the fabric of Silicon Valley, and U.S. businesses depend on their cheaper IT and software solutions, any changes are likely to push up costs.And a more restrictive program would likely mean Indian IT firms sending fewer developers and engineers to the United States, and increasing campus recruitment there.”We have to accelerate hiring of locals if they are available, and start recruiting freshers from universities there,” said Infosys’ Rao, noting a shift from the traditional model of recruiting mainly experienced people in the U.S.”Now we have to get into a model where we will recruit freshers, train them and gradually deploy them, and this will increase our costs,” he said, noting Infosys typically recruits 500-700 people each quarter in the U.S. and Europe, around 80 percent of whom are locals.AcquisitionsTrump’s election win and Britain’s referendum vote to leave the European Union are headwinds for India’s IT sector, as clients such as big U.S. and British banks and insurers hold off on spending while the dust settles.In India’s IT hub of Bengaluru and the financial capital Mumbai, executives expect a Trump administration to raise the minimum wage for foreign workers, pressuring already squeezed margins.Buying U.S. companies would help Indian IT firms build their local headcount, increase their on-the-ground presence in key markets and help counter any protectionist regulations.Indian software services companies have invested more than $2 billion in the United States in the past five years. North America accounts for more than half of the sector’s revenue.”We have to accelerate acquisitions,” said Rao at Infosys, which in the past two years has bought companies including U.S.-based Noah Consulting and Kallidus Technologies.Jatin Dalal, Wipro’s chief financial officer, said his growth strategy is to buy companies that offer something beyond what Wipro already does, or new, disruptive firms — such as Appirio, a U.S. cloud services firm.The chief executive of Tech Mahindra, C.P. Gurnani, said his firm, which two years ago bought network services management firm Lightbridge Communications Corp., is on the look-out for more U.S. acquisitions, particularly in healthcare and fintech — financial technology firms that are disrupting traditional banking services.Offshoring and automationIn a broader shift from labor intensive onsite projects, Indian IT firms are also turning to higher-tech services such as automation, cloud computing and artificial intelligence (AI) platforms.With better technology and faster networks, IT firms are encouraging Western clients to adopt more virtual services.Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka says he has focused on automation and AI as growth drivers since 2014. “The AI platform is 5-6 percent of our revenues,” he told Reuters. “Three years ago, it was zero.”More automation would mean fewer onshore developers.”The ‘Plan B’ would be to accelerate the trend … to reduce their reliance on people and increase their focus on delivering automation, leveraging the cloud for their clients,” said Partha Iyengar, Gartner’s head of research in India.(Reporting by Sankalp Phartiyal and Euan Rocha in BENGALURU and MUMBAI, with additional by Arno Schuetze in FRANKFURT; Editing by Ian Geoghegan) 4 min read Listen Nowlast_img read more