Travis Scott Cardi B To Headline The 2019 Made In America Festival

first_imgNews JAY-Z’s music festival returns to Philadelphia for its eighth year, on Aug. 31 & Sept. 1Ana YglesiasGRAMMYs Apr 2, 2019 – 6:21 pm Today, the Made In America Festival, started by JAY-Z in 2012, announced the lineup for its 2019 fest, featuring GRAMMY nominee Travis Scott and GRAMMY winner Cardi B as the headliners. The two-day event is set to take place in Philadelphia Aug. 31–Sept. 1, and will also include performances from GRAMMY winners Anderson .Paak, with The Free Nationals, James Blake and Kaskade. Fellow Made In America headliner Scott, who just closed out the second leg of his successful Astroworld Tour, will also be performing a select number of festivals, as well as Boston Calling and Rolling Loud in Miami. He and Cardi will also be part of the opening weekend parties at the new KAOS club in Las Vegas.Tickets to Made In America go on sale to the general public this Friday, April 5, with a TIDAL pre-sale currently up and running; more ticket info is available on the fest’s site.Kanye West Will Bring His “Sunday Service” To Coachella 2019 Email 61st GRAMMY Awards first-time nominees Jorja Smith and Tierra Whack are also on the bill, along with rising rappers Juice WRLD and Blueface, among others. The eighth annual festival will take place outdoors at Philly’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and is a great way to close out a busy festival season.Cardi is fresh off her first-time GRAMMY win this February, where she took home Best Rap Album for her debut LP, Invasion Of Privacy. The rap queen will be making her rounds at several other festivals around the globe this year, including Hangout Fest in Alabama and Primavera Sound in Barcelona, Spain. Travis Scott & Cardi B To Headline Made In America travis-scott-cardi-b-headline-2019-made-america-festival Travis Scott & Cardi B To Headline The 2019 Made In America Festival https://twitter.com/MIAFestival/status/1113141671687057410 Twitter Facebook NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Feb 10, 2019 – 9:38 pm Watch: Cardi B Wins Best Rap Album last_img read more

CNET Book Club Infinite Detail asks what if the internet dies

first_img Culture Share your voice CNET Book Club Tim Maughan (right) and Scott Stein (left) at the podcast studio. CNET Cast your mind forward, five, 10, 30 years. What will the future of the ultra-connected smart city be like? Glad you asked, because Infinite Detail is as good an exploration of the promises and fears of the next decade as you’re likely to read.Tim Maughan, a journalist for Vice/Motherboard, New Scientist and the BBC, joins us on the podcast to discuss his novel Infinite Detail. We talk about what scares him about smart cities, the possibilities and pitfalls of augmented reality, and a lot more.Subscribe: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher See Infinite Detail on Amazon9780374175412Infinite Detail. Tim Maughan/FSG Set in both a creepily frictionless New York City of the deep-surveillance near-future and a rebellious anti-surveillance community in Bristol, UK called The Croft, Infinite Detail also jumps back and forth in time. Half of the book takes place in a near future fully immersed in AR smartglasses and information-collecting infrastructures. The other half lives in an even farther-off future where the internet as we know it, and much of the global infrastructure, has collapsed.I won’t spoil anything else in between, but the politically-charged book follows the spirit of Cory Doctorow’s 2017 novel, Walkaway, and in some ways, Station 11 by Emily St. John Mandel: It’s both pre- and post-apocalyptic, and yet also oddly optimistic. I swear. About CNET Book Club The Book Club is hosted by a pair of self-proclaimed book experts: Dan Ackerman (author of the nonfiction video game history book The Tetris Effect), and Scott Stein, a playwright and screenwriter. We’ll be announcing our next Book Club selection soon, so send us your suggestions and keep an eye out for updates on Twitter at @danackerman and @jetscott. Previous episodes Borne by Jeff VanderMeerWalkaway by Cory DoctorowArtemis by Andy WeirDown the River Unto the Sea by Walter MosleyTen Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now by Jaron LanierCNET Book Club: Holiday 2018 gift guide specialTeam Human by Douglas RushkoffGiraffes on Horseback Salad by Josh Frank, Manuela Pertega, and Tim Heidecker Subscribe to CNET Book Club: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher 0 Tags Post a commentlast_img read more

SBI hikes 1year MCLR rate to 815 percent EMIs to get expensive

first_imgSBI hikes 1-year MCLR rate to 8.15 percentReuters fileIndia’s largest lender State Bank of India on Thursday (March 1) increased the one-year marginal cost of funds based lending rate (MCLR) by 20 basis points to 8.15 percent from 7.95 percent across various maturities.Home loan and personal loan borrowers will be affected by the revised rates as it would affect the interest rates on loans. The Increase in MCLR rates by the largest public sector bank in India shows that the EMI (Equated Monthly Installments) will also increase. The new benchmark rate will be effective from March 1, 2018, the bank said through a notification. The hike in MCLR rates comes a day after the bank increased fixed deposit rates of maturities. SBI MCLRSBIThe overnight MCLR rate has been increased from 7.70 percent to 7.80 percent, while the six-month MCLR has been increased from 7.90 percent to 8.00 percent earlier.The two-year MCLR rate has gone up to 8.25 percent from 8.05 percent. Also, the three-year MCLR rate has been raised to 8.35 percent from 8.10 percent.On February 28, SBI has increased the interest rate on various term deposits with immediate effect. For retail domestic deposits below Rs 1 crore, a depositor will now earn 6.40 percent interest rate on one-year deposit, from the 6.25 percent interest rate earlier. Senior citizen for the same amount of deposit and tenure will earn 6.90 percent from 6.75 percent earlier.The proposed rates of interest shall be made applicable to fresh deposits and renewals of maturing deposits, read the SBI statement.MCLR is the benchmark lending rate based on which banks in India lend to borrowers. Till 31 March 2016, banks used the base rate as the benchmark rate to lend.Reuters reports that this is the first hike in the one-year MCLR after the MCLR regime came into effect in April 2016.last_img read more

Abbott Officially Calls Special Session Allowing Lawmakers To Begin Filing Bills

first_imgMarjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas TribuneGov. Greg Abbott lays out items for a special session at a press conference on June 6, 2017.Gov. Greg Abbott issued a declaration for a special session of the Texas Legislature Monday, formally inviting lawmakers back to Austin to pass “sunset legislation” that will keep several key state agencies open.The long-awaited procedural move allows lawmakers to begin filing bills for the special session set to begin on July 18. In addition to the formal declaration, Abbott also released a draft version of 19 additional items he plans to add to the special session agenda later on. Last month, Abbott announced that lawmakers would consider 20 total legislative items during the special session.Lawmakers’ failure to pass “sunset” legislation during this year’s 140-day regular session forced Abbott to call the special session. Absent that measure, government agencies including the Texas Medical Board, which licenses doctors across the state, will have to shut down.“With today’s proclamation, and with bill authors already lined up for all special session items, I look forward to working with the House and Senate to finish the people’s business,” Abbott said in a statement.During the special session, lawmakers will return to several controversial issues that deeply divided the state’s Republican leadership, including a so-called “bathroom bill” that seeks to restrict which bathrooms transgender Texans can use. In his unofficial supplemental call, Abbott described that issue as “legislation regarding the use of multi-occupancy showers, locker rooms, restrooms, and changing rooms.”Abbott also wants legislators to take on school finance reform, school choice for special needs students and several local control measures.Secretary of the Senate Patsy Spaw said her office received a copy of the proclamation around 11:00 a.m., which she forwarded to senators to alert them that they could begin filing bills. A physical copy of the proclamation was also delivered to senators’ offices in the Capitol building. No senate bills have yet been filed for the special session.Meanwhile the House, which has had an e-filing system in place for years, received over two dozen bills before 1:00 p.m.Robert Haney, the House chief clerk, said the first bill filed Monday, House Bill 41 from state Rep. Mike Schofield, R-Katy, was received at 11:42 a.m. The bill aims to change how the state calculates the constitutional spending limit, which restricts how much the budget can grow from one biennium to the next. Sharelast_img read more

Britains Pompeii reveals new clues about life during the Bronze Age

first_imgThought the site is no longer situated on a river, it is quite wet, which is helping to preserve artifacts. The researchers plan to remove them all because it is believed the water level in the areas is likely to fall, removing their natural protective blanket. © 2016 Phys.org Glass beads thought to have been from a necklace. More information: Press release Bronze Age textile made from plant fibres. The site was first discovered back in 2006, but it was only recently that excavations began—a joint effort between the University of Cambridge and Historic England. Items from the houses which sit approximately two meters below ground level, have been dated to approximately 1000-800 BC, which puts them near the end of the Bronze Age—a time dominated by tools and weapons made by mixing copper and tin, from roughly 2500, to 1000 BC. In Britain, the Bronze Age has been extended to approximately 800 BC—it ended when visitors from overseas introduced implements made of iron. Because of the arrangement, the researchers believe the houses were abandoned very quickly, likely due to the fire, which allowed for the preservation of objects as they existed in the everyday lives of people during that time period.Thus far, workers digging at the site have uncovered pots and pans of varying sizes, spears and daggers, exotic glass beads and even textiles that had been fashioned from tree bark. They have also uncovered the charred remains of the timbers that once served as stilts, allowing those living in the house to exist as if on their own tiny island. A human skull has also been found near one entrance, but it has not yet been studied in detail, thus it is not known if it might have belonged to one of the inhabitants of the house. The team has also identified footprints in the sediment. Detail on a 6.3m oak logboat. Close up of stilts and collapsed roof timbers. Explore further Close up of stilts and collapsed roof timbers. Close up of charred wooden bucket base. Citation: Britain’s ‘Pompeii’ reveals new clues about life during the Bronze Age (2016, January 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-britain-pompeii-reveals-clues-life.html Late Iron Age baldric ring with La Tène style decoration, probably part of a shoulder belt for carrying a sword. Shifting sand dunes reveal hidden Bronze Age settlement (Phys.org)—A team of archeologists working at a dig site in Cambridgeshire in Britain has found what they are describing as Britain’s ‘Pompeii’—evidence of everyday life in an ancient society, covered by mud—and the best preserved Bronze Age dwelling ever found in that country. The find consists of two circular wooden houses that once stood atop stilts over a river—when the houses caught fire, they collapsed into the river and were covered by silt, which preserved everyday items inside, such as tables and chairs and jewelry, and even food in bowls. Glass beads thought to have been from a necklace. Bronze Age textile made from plant fibres. Late Iron Age baldric ring with La Tène style decoration, probably part of a shoulder belt for carrying a sword. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more